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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: December 15, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - December 15, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               FAIR gfoflene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT FINAL VOL. LXXIV, NO. 179 AstociatedPrea (AP) ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 15, 1854 PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS PRICE DAILY 5c, SUNDAY lOe MEETING AT WHITE at the White House for a bipartisan meet- ing with President Eijehhower on international and security problems are, left to right, Rep. Carl Vinson Sen. Richard B. Russell Rep. Leo Allen Rep. Joseph Martin and Secretary of State John Foster Dulles. NO. 28 In Burglary Abilene's 28th burglary since Thanksgiving Day occurred with- in the past 24 hours. The latest establishment victi- mized was Abilene Beauty Col- lege, in the Park Office Building, South First and Oak Sts. A burglar stole from a mon- ey drawer at the beauty college tome time between p.m. Tuesday and 8 a.m. Wednesday, City Police Detective Capt. W. B. McDonald said. McDonald stated police haven't determined where or how Hie bur- glar entered. Police Detective Warren Dodson was working with McDonald Wed nesday on the investigation. Sir 'Solved' Six of the 28 recent burglaries cither have been solved in state- ments by arrested suspects or charges have been filed against suspects in connection with them. A possible attempted burglary was reported, by Bea Batbte, 777 Elmwood Dr., Wednesday morn- ing. He said someone apparently tried to get into the garage at his home through a window. Po- lice detectives investigated. They reported that Barbee's wife had found a window screen but that they didn't see any signs of forced entry to the garage. A stolen bicycle has been locat- ed. Four other thefts were reported. A Schwinn bicycle belonging to Jimmy Lynn Abbott, 2065 North 18th St., and reported to have been stolen from him at Fannin Elementary School Tuesday was found Tuesday afternoon. It had been abandoned in Catclaw Creek at North 15th St. HO Missinf Mrs. Loveta Martin, 517 Elm St., said Tuesday that someone about noon stole her green plastic billfold containing two bills. A red lizard purse belonging to Edith Pettigrew, employe of the Chicken Shack, was reported stolen at that establishment Tues- day. The purse contained a dri- vers license and a check. Mrs. D. H. Jefferies Jr., 2849 South Sixth St., said Tuesday that someone stole the speedometer off her son's bicycle. The speedomet- er is a Hawthorne brand, she said. J. W. Andrews, 1241 North Fifth St., reported his tan-and-brown cloth jacket was stolen at the Alexander Building, while he was working there. Injured Worker Has 'Good Night' T. M. DuPree, hoist operator at the new Citizens National Bank who was injured Tuesday after- noon, had a "good a Hendricfc Memorial Hospital spokesman reported Wednesday. DuPree, who works for Rose Construction Co., was pulling a rope starter on a machine when the rope hit him in the right eye. It happened at p.m. He lives at J158 South Third St. THE WEATHER O.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMENCE WEATHER BUREAU ABILENE AND VICINITY Fair today Thursday. High both days 60 to 65, tow tonight 35. NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS: Fair Wed- nesday and Thursday. No Important tem- perature changes. Lowest Wednesday night 28 38 WEST TEXAS: Generally Mr through Thursday. Warmer Panhandle and South Plains Wednesday night Lowest JHW8. EAST AND SOU1H CENTRAL TEXAS: Fair through Thursday. Wanner Thursday. Cold Wednesday night with low in in- terior and 34-44 along coast. High and low temptraturu for M hours ended a.m.; 55 and 28. TEMPERATURES Tucs. P. M. A. 54 33 a s 55 54- 47 S7 fcnlgtii Schools to Oppose Grope St. Rezoning Abilene School Board will ex- press to the City Commission its opposition to proposed re-zoning of the North Eighth and Grape Sts. corners to a business area. The board decided this week to make such a protest because the property involved is near Valley View Elementary School, 1840 North Eighth St. Public hearing and final vote on the proposed zone change will be held the morning of Jan. 7 by the City Commission. The ordinance to carry out the re-zoning has been adopted on the first of the two required readings. Proposed in the ordinance is tve change from the present Zone 3 (two-family residences) to Zone F (local For Service Station Magnolia Petroleum Co. and Dr. J. P. Gibson asked for the zone change. Magnolia .plans to ;put a service station'.oa. the southwest corner of the. North Eighth and Grape Sti. .intersection. Gibson in- tends to put commercial buildings on the northwest corner. The pres- ent zoning wouldn't permit either o fthe project, but the proposed zone would allow both. The School Board is seeking a joint meeting next .Monday at 7 p.m. with the City Commission and the City Planning and Zoning Com- mission to discuss problems com- mon to all three panels. Invitations were sent out Tues- day, said A. E. Wells, superintend- ent of schools. The occasion is to a dinner meeting in Fair Park School cafeteria, if enough mem- bers of the boards can attend. Opposition to business areas near school campuses has been ex- pressed consistently by the School Board. P-TA Opposition Mrs. A. M. Willingham, 633 Vic- toria St., president of Valley View School P-TA, was among the per- sons stating opposition to the re- zoning, at last Friday's. City Com- mission meeting. She said the area is too close to Valley View School for a business district. Others who spoke against the proposal, at the commission meet- ing, were Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Freeman, 1634 Parramore Ave.; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Roberts, 2758 Jeanette St.; Mr. and Mrs. Larry Cunningham, 760 Mulberry St., and C. B. Loe, 1734 North Eighth St. Opponents claimed the change to business zoning would lower the value their residential proper- ties. They said that before Grape St. is zoned for business it should be widened. They opposed what they called "spot zoning." _ Speak, in Favor Several other persons spoke in favor of the zone change. They in- cluded R. H. Scott, district man- ager of Magnolia Petroleum Co.; John LaBar, another Magnolia of- ficial; Ed Traweek and Newel Thompson, realtors; Dr. J. P. Gib- son, 1626 North Eighth Strand J. C. Bowden, 730 Grape St. The realtors said Grape St. al- ready is in fact a business street and will continue to be more so despite its zoning. They said it would be to the best financial in- terest of property owners on Grape St. for it to be zoned as a business area. ROSE LOW ON MAJOR JOB 2d Armory Bids Token for Parking Bontke Bros, of Abilene was ap- >arent low bidder for a parking ot an fencing at the proposed new service center to be built here n connection with the new Abilene National Guard armory. Col. Hank Clewis, U. S. Proper- y and Fiscal Officer for the state if Texas, announced the bids after opening them at the chamber of commerce office here at 11 a.m. He said bids on the service cen- ,er itself probably will be opened about mid-February. The service center is expected to cost about he said. Col. Clewis said Rose Construc- tion Co. of Abilene probably will get the contract to build the arm- ory itself at a cost of more than He said the State Armory Board had recommended to the Pentagon in Washington that Jose's bid be accepted. Previously, the State Board of Control in Austin had announced that McAlister Construction Co. of Abilene was apparent low bidder. Jut Col. Clewis said the board had taken bids on five alternates and that a combination of alternates made Rose low bidder. The build- ing will be face brick and tile. Clewis said there were only two bids received for the service cen- ter parking lot and fencing. Bont- ke's bid was for while E. F. Smith of Abilene submitted a bid of No award is expected on this until after Jan. 1, Clewi said, but the work is expected to take only about two weeks to complete. The service center will be one of the first four in the state to be constructed, Clewis said. Others are at Port Neches, Marshall and Corsicana. Next summer 10 more are to be built, and later nine more will be constructed, making 23 in all throughout the state. The second group will include Wichita Falls, Midland, Dallas, Fort Worth, Pampa, AmariUo, Pharr, Greenville, Waco, and Jacksonville. The third some undetermined date will in- clude San Angelo, Brownwood and Lubbock in West Texas. Ike Wants Taxation Kept at Present Rate GOODFELLOWS' DEADLINE NEAR Pleas for Aid End; More Cash Needed The last of the letters arrived Wednesday. All but a few of them have been sent to the Goodfellows. Some stragglers will come in, and the Goodfellows will try to help, but time is growing short. Wednesday, the Goodfellows are holding open hcase at their toy Yule Contest Attracts 44 Pushing the deadline at 5 p.m. Wednesday, eleven entries hi the Christmas Lighting Contest came into the Abilene Chamber of Com- merce during the morning and more were in prospect. Total is now 44 for judges to look at Thursday and Friday nights. Last year the contest had 60 entries. Prizes total for the con- test in six divisions. No entries have been received in the church division, which offers one prize, and only Houston School has entered the school division. Latest entrants Include: Exterior Mrs. Carl Mahan, 1018 Elmwood Dr., Mrs. Joe Gay- lor, 1217 Buccaneer Dr., Mrs. Wil- liam H. Biggers, 1701 Woodard St., Mrs. Ira Allen Sr., 533 Santos St., W. W. Davis. 3901 Monticello Dr., D. F. McCarty, 4133 Rich mond St., Mrs. R. W. Edwards, 1809 Cedar Crest Dr. Doorway Mrs. W. H. Bledsoe, 3111 South 15th St.. Mrs. Sam Hill, 725 East North 14th St., Nea! Hol- lingshead, 2525 South 19th St. Window Mrs. J. T. Russell, 1609 Butternut St., Mrs. Paul Mc- Carty, 817 Hivercrest Dr., Bob Traylor, 1241 Lilius St, Mrs. Paul B. Grant, 1218 Santos St., Troy Caraway, 658 East North 23rd St., Mrs. James M. Shelton, 873 Le- gett Dr., Mrs. Mabel Marsh, 825 Iherry St., L. J. Maddox, 501 Cedar St., Robert Hill, 1346 Buc- caneer Dr. Living outdoor tree James Harris, 309 Cherry St., Frank Dav- dson, 3226 Waverly Ave. Jehovah's Witness Jailed for Failing To Take Army Oath A member of Jehovah's Witness- es was being held in the Taylor County jail Wednesday morning :or refusing to take the oath when called for induction into the U. S. Army here. Juan Luera Badillo of Big Spring was formally charged Tuesday be- :ore Deputy U. S. Clerk Gladys Walls in the Abilene division office of the U. S. District Court here. Bond was set at S500. Federal Marshal Eugene (Red) Williams arrested Badillo and irought him to the Taylor County iail Tuesday, he said. Charge against Badillo reads that when he reported for induction at :he Armed Services Examining Station here on Nov. 27, he "failed to step up and take the oath." Williams said that he was a member of the Jehovah's Witness- es, a religious sect which does not relieve in serving in the armed forces. President Describes His Theory of UMT UK President Eisenhower described his military policy today as built on the theory that if this country can win a hig war it certainly can win a little one. By this, the President brought out in a general discussion, he meant that planning must always be geared primarily to defense against major aggression. Eisenhower said he does not be- lieve it passible for the United States to buy 100 per cent security in every little corner of the world where somebody wants to make trouble. The President's remarks came at newi which was asked for an explanation of the new reserve forces program outlined to congressional leaders yesterday. On that, he said he would leave the explanation to Secretary of Defense Wilson at a scheduled news conference Friday. Congressional leaders have de- scribed Eisenhower as feeling this training program is absolutely es- sential. Eisenhower discussed his general military-efendse philosophy in re- sponse to n reporter's question as to the accuracy of reports that the size of the Army may be cut back by men and the 1st Marine Division brought back Korea. store, 377 Walnut St., until p.m. Thursday the store will open to parents for whom appointments have been made beforehand. New clothing is already packed and wrapped in bright Christmas paper for some families. Food certificates will be mailec out next week, so that the more- than-500 Goodfellow families may e a good Christmas dinner, pur- chased and prepared according to their own choice. But the Goodfellows" work is far from finished. For one thing, there is still mon- ey needed, almost to pay the bill. Goal this year is but only has been col- lected. Newest contributors include: E.F. White 25.00 Ranchers Class, University Baptist Church............ 13.25 W. H. Morrison 5.00 Abilene Police Association 50.00 Mr. and Mrs. Elam Lilius 15.00 E.Q.H. 10.00 Anonymous..................14.00 Anonymous................... 5.00 Anonymous 3.00 Anonymous 10.00 Anonymous 5.00 Mrs. Ester W. Frazier.......5.00 Nannie Tompkins 5.00 A. E. Frazier 25.00 John W. Odam 5.00 Mrs. 0. P. Griffin............ 5.00 Mr. and Mrs. James B. Jordan Jr. S.oo Mr. and 5.00 Hugh B. Hanley............ ZS.OO Mrs. G. W. Thompson.......5.00 Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Murphy S.tt Mrs. C. L. Johnson S.oi Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Johnson 5.01 A. E. Chapman.............. 2.00 Mrs. J. L. Harkins........ 10.00 Mrs. Dennis Manly 10.00 Fidelis Class, First Christian Church 21 J. D. Perry 5.00 George C. Moss 10.00 Previously acknowledged S.417.42 Total: Charge Filed In Shooting ALBANY, Dec, 15 A charge of assault with, intent to murder was filed here this morning against Charlie Midkiff, about 48, lloran farmer, by Shackelford County Attorney Matt Blanton. The charge resulted from the a.m. Sunday shooting of Sidney Dobbs, 37, Albany laborer, who was reported to be In "sat- isfactory" condition Wednesday morning in Shackelford County hospital. Dobbs was in serious condition for two days, and Blanton waited until the victim's condition chang- ed before filing the charges. Midkiff was being held in the Shackelford County jail Wednes- day morning. Testimony Due To Begin Today In Maiming Trial GEORGETOWN lift-Testimony was to begin today in the trial of Joy Barton, 58, and David Dutton, 46, Brady ranchen charged with emasculation. The jury was completed and iwora in late yesterday afternoon after two days of questioning. The two men are charged with emasculating Sgt. Clyde Bennett and attempting to emasculate Sgt. Tuarles Mitchell at the ranch home of a widow in Mills County last July 4. Both soldiers are stationed at Fort Hood. The two ranchers, who are re- presented by eight attorneys, face prison terms of from 5 to 15 years I convicted. The case a on i change of venue. Hutton Sees Son LOS ANGELES W) Woolworth wiress Barbara Hutton flew from Mexico City for a visit with her son Lance Haugwitz-Revent- tow, a student it UOA. S-D Day Is Safe to Noon Abilene and West Central Texas of noon take pride in their traffic record for Safe Driving Day. Up to that hour, not an injury or a death had been reported from highway or street accidents in Abi- lene or the 13-county Abilene Dis- trict of Texas Highway Patrol. Only three wrecks happened in the city from midnight Tuesday un- til noon Wednesday, and all were considered minor. Texas Highway Patrol hadrf been notified of any traffic acci dents in its 13-county West Cen- tral Texas district (with headquar ters here) up to noon, said Sgt Homer Bailey. Counties in the THP district are Callahan, Eastland, Fisher, Has kell, Jones. Mitchell, Nolan, Scur- ry, Shackelford, Stephens, Stone- wall, Taylor and Throckmorton. Reports of the three minor ac- cidents in Abilene follow, as given by city police: (1) At Cedar St. and Vogel Ave. automobiles driven by Henry Harmon Huse, 2766 Simmons Ave., and Samuel Ross Scott, 1756 Dillingham St., were in collision. (2) At a.m. et South Sghth and Meander Sts. a mo- orcyde driven by Robert Noel Donceel, 1202 Meander St., and an automobile driven by Donley Phil- p Stephenson, 4066 Stratford St., igured in a collision. (3) At a.m. at North Third and Cypress Sts. three cars were in collision. Drivers were Charles Omar Buster, 1341 Hickory St.; James Mally Shaw, 634 Sandefer St., and Lillian Kirk King, 1625 Barrow St., police said. Mercury Plummets To28-Degreelow Freezing weather which covered most of the northern half of Texas irought Abilene its third freeze of he season early Wednesday morn- ng, but temperatures climbed apidly as the sun rose. Following Tuesday's high of 55, he temperature dropped to 28 during the night, four degrees ligher than the season's low of 4. There was "not a cloud in the ky" anywhere over the state hortly before dawn, and there was no prospect of rain, the Weather Bureau reported. Wednesday's temperature was expected to reach 60 or 65, with the same type of weather, a chilly morning and warm, sunshiny af- ernoon, forecast for Thursday. Nobody was injured in any of he accidents. Safe Driving Day is being ob- served today throughout the United States. President Eisenhower was joined by governors, mayors, civic eaders and enforcement officers in pleas for extra careful driving Mayor C. E. Gatlin, proclaiming the day for' Abilene, urged pedes trians as well as drivers to be un usually careful. Capt G. L. Morahan, director of the Abilene District of Texas High way Patrol, and Abilene Polic Chief G. Z. Hallmirk made plea for safe behavior in traffic. The admonished their officers to be particularly vigilant during th day for traffic offenders. IrafficDealhj Total Only 6 For S-D Day By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A scattering of accidents but few traffic deaths were re- ported Driving Day icross the nation. At a.m. EST only she motor ehicle fatalities had been re- ported. There were two hi Ohio md one each in Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, .Indiana and South Carolina. Eleven accidents were reported n Cook County (Chicago) In the first six hours. Areas of snow and rain increased he hazards in the north on the lay set for a test of Americans ibility to drive and walk safely or 24 hours. 4 Pass Tests for Jobs as Policemen Four men apparently passed a written civil service examination Wednesday morning is applicants or police jobs, City Personnel Di- ector Bernard Huett announced t noon. Eleven applicants took the test. Huett had graded the papers bout noon but was re checking lem at the time he announced he results. Seven vacancies exist in the 'olice Department, The successful applicants in i Wednesday's written test will employed as soon as, and if, hey pass the oral interviews, hysical examinations and ation. 100 DOLLS NEED DRESSES; GOODFELLOWS ASK HELP A most urgent SOS went out from the Goodfellows Wednesday morning. They need 100 dolls dressed pronto! Anyone who will dress from one to half a dozen or so can sure do the Goodfellows, and a lot of little girls, a good turn by volunteering for this. Interested women may telephone the Goodfellow store, 3-1222 and the dolls will be sent to the homes. Or, those who wish may drop by the Elmwood Fire Sta- tion at South Seventh and Elmwood Drive and pick up the dolls themselves. Goodfellow Chairman Paul Hodge said the dolls need to be dressed and returned to the Goodfellows this week. Congress Due Plea From President WASHINGTON W-President Ei- senhower said today he will ask the new Congress to postpone the scheduled April 1 at three billion corpor- ation and excise taxes. The President told his con- 'erence the budget deficit makes it necessary for him to make such a request. He said that when you have the government going into the red, fed- eral income must be kept up. Under present law corporation ax rates are scheduled to go down, Trom 52 per cent to 47 per cent on April 1. 12 Billion Lost That would mean an estimated oss of about two billion dollars in evenue. Excise taxes on liquor, tobacco, automobiles and some other items are slated to return to pre-Korean var levels on April 1. That would ause an estimated loss' of one bit- ion dollars in revenue. The President also dealt with, hese other matters: President ex- pressed confidence he will have very real cooperation from tho democrats as well as the Eepub- icans on foreign policy, national defense and mutual security mat- ters. GOP Cooperation The President said that by and large he would expect maximum, cooperation from Republicans on- other matters. National indicated, but did not-say so specifically, that the administration might be think- ing about a further cut in the strength of the armed forces. He was asked to 'comment on a report that .Army' strength will be reduced by an additional men, and that the 1st Marine Div- ision will be withdrawn from Ko- ;a. The President replied any full' exposition would take a good deal of time. He went on to say, how- ever, that development of the long- bomber and atomic weapons las made it necessary for the United States to concentrate first m continental defense, and second- y on preventing strategic areas uch as Western Europe from fall- ing to an enemy attack. Can Cut Back He said that in doing those two lings, the nation can cut back on ts active forces so long as it has an adequate trained military re- erve. Plans to build that reserve, to >e sent to the new Democratic ontrolled Congress, are a .far cry rom Universal Military Training. e said. But he left it to Secretary f Defense Wilson to answer ques- ons about details at a news con- erence Friday. Second President row a round of laughter in saying lat he defends the right of White louse press secretary James C. any other staff mem- say it would be foolhardy or Republicans to fail to nominate Eisenhower for a second term. Hagerty made that remark in a adio interview Monday night. Labor Fnture Labor said the uestion wasiher to ask Congress or an increase in the 75-cent-an- our minimum wage is under in- ensive study. He recalled he told ss in his last economic re- port that the administration does -.vor an adjustment in the wage; oor at the proper time of economy. As to whether the "right to laws of various states should repealed, the President said he as reached no irrevocable deci- ion. He noted that labor unions, re against such aw such things as union nd that many of the states favor .he statutes as a reflection of their nalienable rights in such fields. G. S. Anderson testing 'Just Fine' Mrs. George S. Anderson. 1400 xrnpere Blvd., was "resting just me" about 1 p.m. Wednesday in endrick Memorial Hospital after offering a heart attack at her ome Tuesday afternoon, a hospi- il spokesman said. Her physician said Tuesday ight that she was "doing well." Mrs. Anderson is the wife of le head of Abilene Printing and ationery Co. He is also man of the boards of tne Rtforter publishing Co., Farmer! aM Mw- hanls National Bank, ck Memorial Hospital.   

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