Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Share Page

Abilene Reporter News: Monday, December 13, 1954 - Page 1

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - December 13, 1954, Abilene, Texas                                 FAIR, WARMER  Ehe Hhûene Reporter  EVENING  FINAL  !ê  WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXA<-iLY AS IT GOES"—Byron  VOL. LXXIV, NO. 177  Associated Press (AP)  ABILENE, TEXAS, MONDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 13, 1954-EIGHTEEN PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS  PRICE DAILY 5c, SUNDAY lOc   5    v>V>  ■ f.l    f  Official Charged  Vice City Slaying  SNOW, RAIN FALL  Coldest Weather  Of Year Kills 2  By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS  The coldest weather this fall gripped most of Texas Monday after a weekend norther unloaded snow and chill rain.  Freezing temperatures knifed deep into Central and South Texas.  At leaat two deaths were blamed on the weather. One victim died in a car wreck on rain-slick highway. The other drowned when his boat cap.sized in high wind.  Before sunrise Monday the mercury sank to 14 in Dalhart at the top of the Panhandle. That was the state’s lowest.  Elsewhere in West Texas Amarillo had 21, Lubbock 22, Childress 28, El Paso 27, Wink 23, Abilene 25, Salt Flat 23 and Midland 24.  Dallas had 28. lowest this fall. College Station had 33, Lufkin 28, Mineral Wells 29, Austin 36, San  Houston received an inch. Wind up to 60 m.p.h. flattened trees, snapped power lines and tore up Christmas decorations.  Dallas got a half inch, its first rain in nearly a month. At Henderson, a four-hour storm dropped 4.39 inches of rain, filling creeks bank-rul. At Gainesville 1.07 inches of rain fell through Sunday morning. Wichita Falls had 1.44.  Saturday night and early Sunday snow fell in much of the Panhandle and South Plains.  Dean Blank, 34, Perryton farmer, died Saturday night when his car overturned on wet highway near  Passenger Faces Traffic Danger Too  See related story, page 2-A  Alobaman Arrested In Texas Hospital  P VTROI. BOY RETURNS — This happv reunion took place Monday morning at Lamar Elementary School. Jimmy Davis, center, schoolboy patrolman, returned to school for the first time since suffering serious inj uries in a traffic accident Oct. 19. Welcoming him back are Larry Cunningham, left, and David Welch, right. Jimmy, son ot Mr. and Mrs. C. E, Davis, 850 E. N. 11th St., was struck by an auto Oct, 19 as he directed traffic near his school. His injuries will prevent his serving as a pating in other extracurricular activities the rest of this school year. (Photo by Charles  Cockerell)       L__________  .Antonio 38. Junction 22 and Laredo i snow.  As S-D day tsafe driving day) draws near, every driver should be aware that safe driving is as much a concern of the pa.ssenger as of   .........-      .    ■    c------. .the driver, declares the Texas  Pampa. James Sites. 26. drowned i; Safety A.ssociation. Inc. when w ind and waves overturned j many accidents the driver a skiff in Corpus Christi    Bay    Sun    ^^alks away unharmed while    his  day.    passenger lies lifeless in    the  Heavy frost formed    in Dallas    ;    wreckage. If you are a woman    you  around midnight. It looked    like,    should realize that you are in  39.  County to Invest  Nearly $100,000  Along the coast, readings were mostly in the 40s. Houston had 41, Brownsville 47.  The outlook was for continued cold with another big freeze Monday night.-Clear skies were forecast.  Skies had cleared before dawn Monday except for a band of overcast in East Texas from Lufkin to Galveston. No rain was reported.  Showers formed as the front blew through over the weekend.  greater jeopardy as a passenger driver-bicyc-  A forecaster said that roughly, than as a pedestrian freezing temperatures covered the Esl all put together, slate’s upper half and near-freezing most of the rest of the .stale.  He said although the Panhandle had sub-freezing readings earlier this fall, it’s the coldest this season in most of the rest of Texas.  By JOHN DANILSON  Taylor County commis.sioners Monday took a long look at the county's iund.s, then took several steps to improve the county’s financial .siiualioii.  This came after several articles  criticizing and explaining the hand-    ,    ,  ling of countv finances were pub- Fund. $1.399.8.5: and Highway 1 iLshed in The Abilene Reporter- :50 .Sinking Fund: $9,6o9,73.    1  t(MT recommended the investment.  I.ong Term Bonds  Long-term investments in government bonds were approved using money from the following funds:  Highway 600M Sinking Fund, $32,544.85: Highway 27.5M Sinking  & The  News.  The Commissioners Court decided to invest close to $100,(KK) in long-term and .short-term bonds. This will provide income interest from money which previously hadn’t been bringing in any.  County Auditor Herbert Middle-  ably won’t be needed immediately, he said.  Some For Short Terms The commissioners also expressed approval at Middleton’s recommendation to invest $40,000 to $45,-000 of the $91.034 94 in Road District No. 1 Sinking Fund on a shortterm basis.  The District No. 1 funds can be  totals of these funds will not be j ‘ safely invested” on only a short-  invesUHi. because bonds come in round numbers. Middleton said the actual invested totals likely will be $32,500, $1,300 and $9,600 or $9.650.  Middleton said this money can be ‘‘saleiy invested” on a longterm basis. This means it prob-  Goodfeilows Asked To Help Children  "I don’t care for myself, but children don’t realize the facts, and it would hurt them so.”  The anxious mother’s brow was wrinkled with worry as she scribbled the nolo to her children’s teacher.  “    1    am    not    able    to    get    their  Christmas presents. So if you will turn their names into the  term basis, because the money might be needed in the future at an unpredictable time, Middleton said.  The commissioners deferred action on authorizing the investment of the $40,000 to $45.000 until a place can be found to make the investment.  Middleton said that not all of the District No. 1 fund can be “safely invested” because the fund is active. The fundlis being used to pay principal and interest on two bond issues, he said.  To Transfer Money  The commissioners voted to  Dixon-Yates Pact May Be Altered, Says New Mexican  Mercury Hits low of 24  The front seat —• next to the driver’s seat — is commonly called the suicide seat, because of the vulnerability of passengers seated there in the event of an accident.  On S-D day. and all other times, let’s drive with such consideration and care that our passengers are relaxed and safe in our automobiles. Let’s justify their confidence in us!  West By-Pass Speed Urged  ALBUQUERQUE i4>L-Sen. Clinton P. Anderson said today that the new Congress may direct the .Atomic Energy Commission to cancel the controversial Dixon-A’ates power contract unless the agreement is again very substantially modified.”  Sen. Anderson, scheduled to become chairman of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy, made the prediction in a letter to Ralph H. Demmler, chairman of the Securities and Exchange Commission.  In the letter Anderson asked that Demmler urge the commission to withhold its approval of the proposed Dixon-A’ates financing plan until the joint committee has a chance to lake another lo<^ at the over-all contract.  Contributions may be sent to the i ^  ,\bilene Reporter-News. Checks ' Iransfcr money from three funds  should be made payable to the Goodfeilows.  (’jyj) or any club—that will help  them to have some Christmas.  *‘I thank you all for the things vou all have done for the children, for letting them have their lunches so cheap for I am not able to give them the right food. So many  thanks.”    ,  The teacher turned the mother s frantic letter over to t’ne Goodfel-lows The letter came Monday-two days before Wednesday’s deadline for receiving requests from the needy and unfortunate.  Other letters came, too. The letters come everyday, because the needy in Abilene are numerous.  “VVould love very much to have a good dinner for Christmas lor my crippled boy that is in a wheel chair, has been for 4 years.” another letter said.  “He doesn’t have no mcome or I don’t either. I have been sick myself for 2 years and can I work go without a little help. 1 am afraid Christmas will be very slim for us. Would like some warm clothes  for the boy.”  The circumstances vary.  A third letter said;  ‘i am the father of six children and out of a job at the present. We have been picking cotton the past few days, but it has taken all we made to live on. And it doesn’t look like we are going to be able to buy the children any Christmas. We know you have so many to help this year. Our mattress burnt last week^and we are orowded for bedding.  The latest contributors are: Previously acknowledged $1,778.27  Anonymous ..................5.00  Anonymous ................... 5.00  Mr. and Mrs. Jo.seph Grba . 5.(K) Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Stowe .    . 5.00  Women’s Auxiliary-Mizpah 5.00 Home Builders Class,  Aldersgate Church .......... ‘25.00  Phyllis A. Nibling ............ 5    00  Wes-Tex Fire Equip. Service 5.00  P. G. Hatchatt ............. 10    00  Kiwanis Club of Abilene — 100.00  Mrs. T. F. Grisham.........10.00  A. K. Doss ................. 7..50  Mr. and Mrs. John C. Ward .. 25.00  Jack Fulwiler ................ 5.00  G. L. Corrie ......   5.00  Neely-Barnes  ............ 10    00  Mr.s. E. E. Callaway.......... 5.00  Victory Men’.s Bible Class 27.83 Employes of Reporter-News 88.80  2132,42  into other funds. Thi.s also was on Middleton’s recommendation. Purpose of the transfer is to get the money into active funds where it can be used. The funds from w'hich the money was transferred were inactive.  The transfers are;  1. $1.616.11 from the Courthouse Sinking Fund to the Permanent Improvement Fund. The Permanent Improvement Fund contained $1.617.11 as of Nov. 30  2. $331.14. from the Jail Sinking Fund to the Permanent Improvement Fund.  3. Forty - seven cents. from Road District No. 7 to the General Fund. (District No. 7 does not have a sinking fund'  Middleton a.sked the commissioners what they wanted to do about outstanding accounts in the county. also mentioned in the Reporter-  Abiiene’s coldest hour of the 1954 winter came about 6 a m, Monday when the mercury dropped to 24 degrees, after a high of only ,46 Sunday.  However, the temperature is ex- i Two Abilene Chamber of Com-pected to stay above the freezing merce officials asked the Taylor mark tonight after a high of 55 to County Commissioners Court 60 today, and rise Tuesday to 65 Monday to speed work on getting or 70 degrees.    ;    the    west    by    -    pass    around    Abi-  The week end cold front de-1 lene. livered the first snow of the sea- County Judge Reed Ingalsbe son here, a trace, before dawn told them the county is making ef-Sunday morning, but dumped a | forts to get the new expressway  GALVESTON, Tex. m — Alabama’s attorney general, Silas Garrett III, today was served with a fugitive warrant charging he slew Albert L. Patterson, the man who would have succeeded him in office.  His attorney said Garrett would return to Alabama voluntarily when his treatment is completed.  “His doctors say it will take six to eight weeks to put him in shape,” said Richard Thornton.  “When that time is up, he will go back voluntarily. But he is a very sick man and we will fight any attempt to extradite him before his course of treatment is completed.”  Garrett was placed under technical arrest on a first degree murder warrant. He is one of three men charged in the shoi>ting last June of Albert L. Pattenson. crusading candidate nominated to succeed Garrett.  It was Patterson’s death that touched off the cleanup of Phenix City, Ala., notorious honky-tonk town on Alabama’s Chattahoochee Riv*er.  Thornton said Garrett made no comment when served at the hos pital with the warrant.  Garrett reportedly was in Birmingham, Ala., at th« time Patterson was slain.  The indictment against him, however, alleges he shot Patterson.  Sheriff O.E. Henson served the warrant.  Jules Damiani, first assistant Galveston county attorney, said the warrant charged Garrett “unlawfully ajfid with maVice aforethought killed Albert L. Patterson by shooting him with a gun.”  Serving of the indictment on Garrett bad been expected since Saturday. It had to wait pending the arrival from Alabama of a fugitive warrant.  Doctors said Garrett is too sick to be moved.  Garrett is a central figure in the notorious Phenix City, Ala., cleanup.  Patterson, who crusaded against vice, in his election campaign, wai killed last June 18.  Post Office Ftood Begins; Hetp Added  Christmas mall began flooding in the post office at full speed Monday.  It was this season’s first really busy day, said Po,stmaster Clyde Grant.  good three inches of wet whiteness on Lueders. where it fell before 2 a.m. Sunday.  Key City residents didn’t have a chance to look at their snow, which melted as it hit, but there was still a little snow on the ground at Lueders Sunday night.  Lueders reported .65 inch of moisture Saturday night, bringing total week end precipitation there to 1.58 inches. Anson and Seymour got two-inch rains Saturday, while other area towns had lighter rains.  STATE FINAL'SPECIAL'  Train, Plane May Make Houston Trip  See COUNTY. Page 3-A, Col. 4  Planning to take in the game between Abilene High School and Austin High School of Houston Saturday in Houston?  If so, you will probably be able to take one of two special forms of transportation to the game, if the plans can be worked out.  Pioneer Airlines has a special flight planned to Houston and back Saturday, and the Booster Club is working with school officials on plans for a possible special train, either with the Santa Fe or the Texas & Pacific.  Jerry Warren, Abilene manager for Pioneer, said the special flight will carr>’ 36 passengers. If there Ls a full load, the fare will be S56 87 for a round-trip ticket. This is the standard fare for the trip.  Pope Weaker or Better? Vatican Reports Say Both  “The first 36 persons to make reservations and get their tickets will get the seats,” Warren said.  Elmo Cure of the Abilene Booster Club said that checks were being made with railroad officials to get costs and running time of a possible special train, which would leave here very early Saturday morning, possibly about 2 a.m., for the trip to Houston.  “If the school administration and the children want the special train, the club will go all out to get it,” Cure .said. The question will probably be settled at a Booster Club meeting Monday night.  Previous special trains have carried more than 600 persons on each of two trips this year, and each one was noted for its general orderliness. Cure estimated that about 500 persons would want to ride a special to Houston.  as fast as possible.  The C-C officials wer« Jo« Cooley, manager, and Jesse (T-Bone' Winters, chairman of the C-C’s highway development committee.  The pair a.sked the commissioners about employing the three per.sons who already have obtained the right - of - way east of town for a State Highway 36 project, to work on getting right-of-way for the west by-pass.  Judge Ingalsb« said three appraisers already have been hired and are working <m getting the west by - pass route.  The C-C officials also asked if the county would get in touch with the State Highway Department about pushing the work. Judge Ingalsbe said the county would do that.  Cooley told a reporter later the C-C is interested in having the right-of-way obtained as soon as possible in order that the C-C may then start work on trying to get an appropriation for cimstruction.  Yule Lighting Entries Rise  Four additional delivery trucks have joined the post office’s fleet of six trucks. The four were furnished by the National Guard.  Before Christmas, the Army Recruiters and the Soil Conservation department will loan pick-ups to help mail deliveries.  A few extra workers pitched in Monday to help regular postal clerks. Forty temporary employes are lined up to work later on, Grant said.  For the first 10 days in December, the post office had a total of ^,311 cancellations (pieces of unpackaged mail.) From Dec. 1-10 in 19.53, there was a total of 552,220 cancellations.  Parcel post sacks so far this month numbered 2,351, with 193 parcels that were too large to fit in the sacks.  Last year at thU time there were 2,164 parcel post sacks, with 228 outside packages.  Hie post office’s busiest day last year was the Monday before Christmas. Postmaster Grant expects this week to be heaviest on out-going mail, with the delivery peak to be reached next week.  He echoed his pleas for Abilen-ians to get their Christmas mailing done early. He reminded people to tie up Christmas cards into two bundles, one for out-of-town and one for local delivery.  Parcel post packages going to a point within 150 miles of the post office cannot weigh over 40 pounds. Anything over 150 miles is limited to 20 pounds, Grant said.  Four persons entered the Christmas Lighting Contest Monday, making a total of 17 contestants. Five divisions are included In the contest — window, doorway, residence exterior, school exterior, and live outdoor tree.  Wednesday is the final day for entering the contest. Anyone who wishes to may enter their decora-tiwis through the Chamber of Commerce.  Latest to join to the comprtltlon are Mrs. Jack Evans, 1409 Sylvan Dr., residence exterior; Mrs, E. H. Andrews, 801 Jefferson Dr., doorway; J, W, liove, 402 Burger St., and Mrs. C. W. McCall, 801 Willis St., windows.  Houston Elementary is the only school entered in the school exter ior division.  THE WEATHER  ».8. DEPARTMENT OP COMMERCS WEATHER BUREAU  ABILENE AND VICINITY — Fair and rather cold today and tonUiht, fair and a little wanner Tueaday. Rixh today <• to tS, low toniyht near 39. High Taeodaf 95 to 70.  NORTH CENTRAL AND WEST TEXAS-Pair through Tuesday. Wanner Tuesdp In aU except sxtrems southeast tonight Lowest tonight m-38.  High and tow tempsratures for 34 houM anded at 9:30 a.m.; 4* and 24.  TEMPERATURES Sun. P.M.    Mon. A.M.  49  4«  4«  49  44  40  3S  39  39  n  3»  1:30  2:30  3:30  4:30  9:30  4:30  7:30  9:30  9:30  10:30  11:30  30  30  2S  27  25  25  27  32  40  49  53  ............ UiK      99  Sunris« today 7:32 a.m. Sunset tonight 9:39 p.m.  Barometsr reading at 12:30 p.m. 38.32. Relative humidity at 12:30 p.m.  Abilene Milkshed Placed On National Honor Roll  VATICAN CITY im- Reliable informants in the Vatican said Pope Pius XII was somewhat weaker today, bub a later oiiieial staie-ment said his condition showed a slight improvement.  Any change for the worse in his condition would be the first since the coHapse which brought him near death on Dec. 2. He has made a siaw, but steady, gain ever since.  The reports, unofficial but reliable, from within the Vatican »aid  the Pope was having difficulty in getting food down and seemed to be feeling the strain of yesterday’s big event—consecration of his good friend Msgr. Giovanni Battista Montini as archbishop of Milan.  k Vatican communique issued at 2:30 p.m. said;  Slight improvement “This morning a slight improvement was found in the health of the holy father. The pontiff as usual devoted much of his time to prayer and work. Audiences with Msgrs. Domenico Tardini (proseo-  retary of state for ordinary affairs) and Angelo Dell’acqua (substitute secretary of state) took place to-1 day as usual.”  Official reports in the past have, been inclined to minimize the seri- j ousness of the 78-year-old Pope's condition.  Later, two highly placed Vatican sources said the official bulletin had been toned down at the request of the Vatican Secretariat of Slate. The sources said that as originally' written it was “somewhat less timistic.”  Abilene has been placed (mi the national Standard Milk Honor Roll by the U. S. Public Health Service, the first time it has ever received that recognition.  Announcement was made Monday by Dr. Hugh J. Stennis, director of Abilene - Taylor Ckiunty Health Unit, and W. W. ClarksiMi, senior sanitarian of the unit.  The health unit has the responsibility of protecting the safety qf Abilene’s milk supply.  Met All Eequtrements The award of honor roll standing means that milk production and processing operations throughout the approximate 20-county Abilene milkshed meet all requirements for public health.  H. Price aod W. W. Greer, inspectors from the Food and I Drug Division, Texas State Department of Health, spent two weeks here last June to check the Abilene milkshed and plants. The information that they compiled was sent to the U S. Public Health Service in Washington, D. C.. where the honor roll rating was given.  Certificate ol the award tiates  that .Abilene has attained a rating of 90 3 per cent on retail raw milk a 92.6 per cent on pasteurized milk under the U. S. Public Health Service rating system.  Five times as large a volume of milk is processed here as was processed two years ago, Stennis said. The area covered by the Abilene milkshed is nearly four times as great as two years ago, he added.  30,009 Gailons Dally  About 30,000 gallons of milk are processed in Abilene daily. Some of it is sold as far as 450 miles away —El Paso. The milkshed now extends about 150 miles east, 60 miles south, 100 miles north and 60 mil^ west from Abilene.  Premises and operations of every dairy and other milk producer throughout the 20-county milkshed are checked regularly by Abilene-Taylor County Health Unit.  All milk processing plants in Abilene are visited weekly fw inspection.  Samples from all producing farms and dairies and from every processing plant are analyzed and tested regularly «1 tkm healUi unit  concern nu*  laboratory. These tests bacteriological safety and tritional qualities.  Health Cards Points checked on inspections of producers’ premises include: proper equipment, clean equipment, health cards of employes, healthy cows, safe water supply.  At the procming plants, inspectors check on equipment (whether proper and clean) and health cards.  Tests are run at the laboratory on raw milk as delivered to the processing plants — for temperature, bacteria, milk fat, and water.  Other tests are ’•un on retail raw and pasteurized mdk after being bottled or pasteurized. Bacteria, fat and protein, phosphate and water are checked.  Health unit perswinei most responsible for the milk protection program are W. W. Clarkson, sen* ior sanitarian; Otto Howard, H. B. Hildebrand, Earl Bullock and Charles Coggin, milk sanitarians; Tommy Clements, laboratory director: and Clara Corning and cun Baird, laboratory tachaiclaBa»   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 145+ million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication