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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: December 10, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - December 10, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               COOL EVENING FINAL "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL. LXXIV, NO. 174 Auociattd Prm (AP) ABILENE, TEXAS, FRIDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 10, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS PRICE DAILY 5c, SUNDAY 10e 3 Youths Accused Of 4 Burglaries Three youths were charged Fri- day morning with burglary in con- nection with four Thursday night burglaries here. Tip from an alert citizen that somebody was committing a burg- lary at Slim Ford's Garage, 928 North llth St., led to the arrest of the three youths plus a fourth one also implicated. The fourth boy is only 16, and therefore of juvenile age. Two of the youths were appre- hended at the Ford garage a few minutes after the tip was given. Charged in Justice of the Peace II. F. Long's court were Glenn Rue Tucker, 21, of 1610 Mesquite St.; Bruce Gaddy, 18. of 802 Locust St., and Kenneth McMinn, 17, of 620 North 16th St. Their bonds were set at each. The burglaries in connection with which they are held were al legedly committed at the following places: Ford's Garage, 928 North llth St.. where a cable was stolen; Abilene Pastry Shop, North 19th and Pine Sts., where about worth of cakes and pies were taken; Oil Field Service and Equipment Co.. 1535 Walnut St. about worth of articles includ ing a car battery, an electric drill a portable radio, a number of me- chanical tools and a box of micro- meters; and Abilene Cycle Shop, 926 North llth St., where motor- cycle accessories, gloves, goggles and trophies were stolen, amount to a value of about The four Thursday night burg- laries brought to 26 the number occurring in Abilene during the period beginning with Thanksgiv- ing Day. One had been solved be- fore Thursday. Charges filed Friday morning will be investigated by 42nd Dis- trict Court grand jury meeting in January. Police Detective U. George Sut- ton filed the complaints. He said Detective-Warren Dodson appre- hended the juvenile (16-year-old) luspect inside the Ford garage about 10 p.m. 'or a little before that Thursday night He said Police Pa- trolmen 0. R. Spross and G. H. McGee, caught Gaddy outside the bujlding at the Ford garai McMinn was arrested a few min- utes later at his home. Tucker came voluntarily to po- lice headquarters. He told officers in a signed statement that he saw his automobile being driven by what he thought was a policeman and decided to come to the police station. The three men who were charg ed Friday had signed a statement concerning the four burglaries, be- fore Lt. Suttoa, Police Sgt. Robert E. Stewart and Police Detective Capt. W, B. McDonald Thursday night. left Turns OffPineSf. Restricted Left turns off Pine St. from North First to North Fifth Sts., in- clusive were ruled out by the City Commission Friday morning from now until Jan. 1, at those times when signs placed at the corners so state. Portable signs are being made, and Police Chief C. Z. Hallmark said he hopes have them set ia the street Saturday. Purpose of the emergency ordi nance, passed on both requira readings Friday, is to relieve traf fie congestion as much as possible during the Christmas shopping season. The ordinance doesn't affec turns off of intersecting streets onto Pine St. Speed limit regulations in- schoo zones will be amended by anothe ordinance, if passed on secom reading. That ordinance, adoptei on the first reading Friday, state that the 20 mile per hour limi shall be in effect from a.m. t e p.m. daily Mondays through Fri days, and that at all other time the limit will be 30 miles per hour Heretofore, the 20-mile limit i school zones applied every day an at all hours. Seven candidates will compete iaturday in a sudden death race or the four-year. State Senate erm for the ij-county 24th Sena- oriai District. There will be no unoff. The candidate with the most votes in Saturday's election will serve the full four-year term. Polls will open at a.m. and Jose at 7 p.m. Saturday in Taylor, lolan, Mitchell, Howard, Scurry, iorden, Fisher, Jones, Shackel- ord. Stonewall. Kent, Garza and Dickens Counties. The race to pick a successor to the late Sen. Harley Sadler of Abi- BRUCE MARVIN GADDY Sheppard Describes Fight With Assailant Accused Slayer On Stand Again KENNETH RAY MCMINN CLEVELAND heavy hush filled the small courtroom today as Dr. Samuel Sheppard told how he regained consciousness on the floor outside his wife's bedroom the morning of July 4, then looked in- side to see her beaten and bloody. The osteopath had described how a mystery assailant struck him down from behind when he ran up- stairs to answer his wife's screams for help. Then, in a slow, halting voice Sheppard said, "I realized I liad been hurt and as I came to some sort consciousness I looked at my wife." Corrigan asked him what he saw. Apparently reaching for words, Sheppard said: "She was iu very bad condition. "She had been badly beaten. I 7 Senate Hopefuls Compete Saturday lene involves two state representa-' tive, a former state senator from this district, a doctor, a lawyer, and two businessmen. 7 Candidates They are former State Sen. Pat Bullock of Colorado City; State Reps. Truett Latimer of Abilene (insurance man) and David Rat- iiff of Stamford (radio station own- Dr. R. F. Wasson of Snyder; Dan Sorrelis, Abilene attorney; Mayor Cecil Lotief, Rotan mer- chant; and Juston M, Morrow of Rotan, businessman and farmer POLL JUDGES URGED TO CALL SENATE RETURNS TO 4-7271 A Taylor County election burau will be operated Saturday night by the Abilene Reporter-News and the city's two radio stations to compile and report results of the 24th District state senatorial race. The bureau will be in the business office of the news- paper. Election judges are urged to report returns as soon as possible to both the newspaper and the radio stations by calling one Representatives of the stations wiu oe in the Re- porter-News offices to call returns to the stations as soon as they are received from the judges. SIGN REPLACED Church of Christ Wins Rome Victory who is immediate past state VFW commander. Taylor County Judge Reed Ing- alsbe urged voters to go to the polls early to avoid the normal last-minute rush. In recent elec- tions, the last hour and a half has provided nearly 30 per cent of the balloting, election judges re- port. Ingalsbe issued an urgent call to election judges to get all returns into his office before noon Monday. The Commissioners Court is re- quired by law to canvass returns within two days after the special election, which means that it must be done Monday afternoon. Taylor County precincts, their locations and election judges in- clude: Prtcinctc Listed j Jess Blanton. St. Fire Station, 0. J. Hamilton. 3-South llth St. Fire Station, Dan Gallagher. Park Women's Bldg., Harvey Hays. 5-South llth St. Scout Hq., Paul McCarty. West Fire Station, Malcolm Schulz. 7 Gold Star Dorm, McMurry, Bob Wylie. I Bowie School, Neil Daniel. 9 YMCA, Percy Mayfield. 10 Woodson school, R. W. Stafford. II ACC Fire Station, J. E. Freeman. 12 St. Fire Station, W. T. Walton. Fannin School, Matt Cas- HOME Homes Church of Christ today replaced its stone lettered "Chiesa di Cristo" sign torn down by Italian police last February. The action climaxed a 10-month legal battle. It was the second not- able victory, won by American- supported Evangelical churches in Italy in recent weeks. The other came last month when the State Council, Italy's highest 'EVERYBODY "Police Chief Urges Day of Safe Driving Chief of Police C. Z. Hallmark today asked for help. "Yes, I'm asking for help. Hall- mark said. "I am asking every driver and pedestrian in Abilene to help reduce traffic accidents to a minimum zero, if we can on Dec. 15, S-D Day (Safe Driving "1 am asking every man, wom- an and child who uses the streets to accept full personal responsibil- ity for observing the letter and spirit of all traffic regulations. "S-D Day is being observed all over the country. It is sponsored by the President's Action Commit- tee for Traffic Safety and hun- dreds of local, state and nationa organizations to demonstrate thai traffic accidents can be reduced materially if we all pitch in. We're going to give S-D Day our full sup port in Abilene, but it's a program k which mint Set related stwy, page 1-B. "Police drivers and civilian em- ployes of the Police Department are being urged to set a good ex- ample on S-D Day. They are be- ng asked to exercise particular caution in their driving and walk ng on that day. We want to show :he people of Abilene that we also iractice what we preach. "In Abilene on an average week day (or during an average week this lime of the year we hav about six traffic accidents of al types. These accidents don't hav to happen, and they wouldn't hap pen if every citizen would driv and walk as he would have every one else drive and walk. "Remember S-D Day, and the make every day your Safe Driving magistracy, ordered the Interior Ministry to act upon a formal peti- on of the Assembles of God in aly for juridical recognition. Cline R. Paden of Brownfield nd Lubbock, Tex., one of the irst organizers of the Church of hrist in Italy after the war. ex- ressed pleasure with the latest evelopment. But he sharply criticised the de- ision which found a police com- missioner guilty of having abused is powers in ordering the sign re- loved. said Paden, "we are glad to have our sign back, ut we are sorry that the police ommissioner has been made the capegoat to bear the sins of those ealiy guilty." Last Feb. 13, Italian police sud- denly descended upon the Church Christ in Rome's Via Achille 'apa, put up ladders and chiseled rat the 10 inch letters. They said at the time that they acted upon direct orders of Rome's police leadquarters. Attorney Giacomo Rosapepe of tome, who represents both the 3hurch of Christ and Assemblies of God in Italy, said the police ac- ion was against the law of the state and immediately began legal action in the church's behalf. The church had applied for per- mission to put up its sign in No- vember, 1953, and approval was .eceived from the Commune ot Rome on Jan. 13, 1954. The Church of Christ owns the building in which its church is located. Paden said that objections to the sign were first raised by priests 13 ey. 14 North Park School, R. W. Stuard. 15 McGlothlin Barn, Eldon Forbus. IS Hamby School, Jack Can- non. 17 American Legion Club- house, W. M. Antilley. 18 School, Will Nesmith. 19 _ wylie School, L. W. Mans- field. 20 Caps store (Caps Abi- W. A. Harber. 21 Tye School felt that she was dead. "I was immediately fearful for Chip. I went into Chip's room and in some way evaluated that he was all right. I don't know how I did it." He said he went downstairs. "There I visualized a he said. The lawyer asked him where. "Between the front door of the house and the yard somewhere." Corrigan again asked him to describe his mental condition when he regained consciousness "from this attack." Sheppard paused and said: "I was very in the language we use as slang. I was stimulated or drawn to try to chase this person which I did." He said he went down the steps toward the beach, losing sight of "this person" on the way. "That's all I can remember un- til I came to in the water." Corrigan asked him if he could describe the person with whom he struggled. Sheppard replied: "I felt it was a relatively large form in dark clothing. There was evidence of a good-sized head with a bushy appearance on the top of the head. The defense attorney asked him where he was when he again re- gained consciousness and Sheppard said: "I don't know exactly, but I was on the beach with my head toward the seawall. The waves were break- ing over me, moving the lower part my body." Corrigan again asked him about his mental condition and Sheppard replied: "I was extreme'ly con- fushed. I didn't know where I was." "How long did you lie Corrigan asked. 'I don't Sheppard re- plied. Alter long preliminary question- ing by defense attorney William J. Corrigan, the 30-year-old osteopath arrived at the point where he fell asleep early on the morning of July 4 while his wife went on to "The first thing I can Dr. Sheppard began, "was hearing Marilyn call out my name once or twice, followed by moans, loud moans, and noises of some sort. "I was awakened by her cries and in my drowsy recollection de- cided to go to Marilyn which I did as soon as I could navigate. My subconscious feeling was that Marilyn was experiencing convul- sion as she had earlier in her preg- nancy. "I ascended the stairway and went into her room and I felt I could visualize a form of some kind with a light top. 'I felt I was struck from behind and my recollection was cut off. "The next thing I remember doing is a very vague recollection of coming to, right next to Mari- lyn's bed, facing south. I recall vaguely recognizing my wallet on the floor beside me." THIS SUITS MR. Hodge, far left, chairman of the Goodfellows, helps three employes of Minter's Dry Goods Co. pack some of the approximately aO suits donated by the store into a box. Employes are, left to right, Dallas Murphy, Coke Mingus, and Dewey Barnes. (Staff photo) THE WEATHER WEATIEK BUREAU ABILENE AND VICINITY Pirfly ctomly ud ratter cool lodat lonUkt ud Saturday. HUH Urfw traUhl to 90. high SfttQiday 60. Sllfht chance of run Saturday. NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS-Increumt cloudiness and warmer thU afternoon ana tociibt. Occasional rain tonight. Saturday, partly cloudy windy wHa iMtterri thunderstorms in northweaL WIST TEXAS-Partlr etondr ud windy ctoidjr and warm- V 44 4' K 45 42 Sunset iMt nUht p.m. Sunrise today 7-30 a-m. Sunset tonight p.m. Barometer reading at p.m. RelaUve bmnidlty at pjn. 359i. Hlih and low tensperatura (or J4 noun ending at ajn.: CO and 41. Pilot Charged LUBBOCK, Dec. 10 Harris Smith, 38, a crop dusting pilot, today was charged with mur- der with a motor vehicle in the death last nigh.t of Betty Gene Han- cock, 21. Goodfellows Given 50 Men's Suits Goodfellows' Store was richer by about 50 men's suits donated by Winter's Dry Goods Co. Friday morning. Most of the suits had been "used to some Paul Hodge, Goodfellows chairman, said. "We're mighty happy to get them, and we'll eventually find a home for them where they can be he added. The suits will be distributed at the Toy Store on North Third and Walnut SU., Hodge said. After the store closes, those that have not been distributed will be turned over to the Salvation Army, which handles most of the. Good- fellows' used clothing requests. Decorations on the store started going up Thursday with everyone from Brownie Scouts to Red Cross workers helping. The store will hold open house Dec. 15 and will open for business Dec. 16. Hundreds of toys will be dis- Theo Newton. (Tye- of the nearby "Cristo tta Kiaj-C-tholic. ehurch. 22 McCartney home W. McCartney. 23 Drummond home (Caps- H. Drummonr' 24 Welfare Merkel, H. H. Teaff. 25 Williamson Hardware, Trent, Leonard Quattlebaum. 26 Addison home, Blair, Z. V. Moore. Butman, Dewell McLean. 28 Brick store, View, H. U. Drummond. 29 Duncan home, Iberis, G. F. Duncan. 30 County barn, Buffalo Gap, A. B. Talley. 31 First State Bank, Tuscola, Floyd Hodge. 32 Old banit, Ovalo, H. Rid- dle. 33 County barn, Guion, E. J. Moody. 34 Shep school, B. H. Pritch- ard. 35 Old bank, Bradshaw, Bill McCasIand. 36 City hall, Lawn, M. A. Patterson. 37 Rogers school, Jim Ned, Cyril Jones. 38 Coffman Luman, J. D. Cottam. Mrs. Sadler'Better' Following Surgery Mrs. Harley Sadler, widow of the late state senator, is reported resting well at her home, 1941 South Seventh St., Mowing major surgery in Scott t White Hospital in Temple Nov. 15. French Robertson, close friend of the family, reported that the operation was believed to have been a success. Mrs. Sadler plans to return to Temple shortly after the first of the year for further checks, however. She was brought back home to Abilene last week, Robertson said, but as yet is having no visitors except relatives and close friends of the family. SUNDAY HEADLINERS IN THE REPORTER-NEWS The J5 million "heart" of the Abilene Air Force about ready to feel the throb of life. This Sunday's Reporter-News will tell the dramat- ic story of how the subsurface, concrete and asphalt were laid. Another Sunday Reporter-News special will be pic- tures of the presidents of the senior dance clubs that meet at the Abilene Country Club. Stories about a Jones County pioneer known to four generations of cowmen and of the interesting Me of the fabulous Sam Raybtirn will be in the Sunday Reporter-News. You may reserve extra copies of The Reporter-News with your'agent or nearest newsstand, for 10 cents. played, and counters win be set up for clothing, cosmetics, and sporting goods. Tinfoil, tinsel and greenery will decorate the store front and interior. Annual Goodfellow movie has been set for a.m. Dec. 18'at the Paramount, Interstate Man- ager Wally Akin said. The movie is free, but the au- dience has been asked to bring canned goods, fruits, nuts, or any other kind of food, and clothing instead of toys. Akin said. Firemen will not have time to re- pair toys at so late a date, he ex- >lained. Movie this year will be "Caval- ry with Rod Cameron, and three cartoons. Mr. Goodfellow's pockets are far from full, when it comes to ing all the hundreds of requests' for help which come to him. FTiday morning, contributions had totalled only more than short of the goal of more than which the group needs. Budget looks like this: Cloth- ing, toys, food. 500; contingent fund, ?250; pack- ing, decorations, and secretary's salary, Latest contributors to the fund: Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Douthit Anonymous................. 10.00 Anonymous.................. 2.00 Anonymous...................5.00 Anonymous...................2.00 Zeta Alpha Chapter, Beta Sigma Phi.......... 25.00 Mrs. Rose Haworth 5.00 Mrs. C. M. Presley 5.00 Charlie Flint............... 10.00 Charles A. Kessler.......... 10.00 H. E. Henriksen..............10.00 Previously acknowledged NORTH FIRST ST. CHANGE OKAYED Argument Brings Delay In Grape St. Zoning Vote Final action on proposed re-zon- ing to a business zone of the four corners of the Grape and North Eighth Sts. intersection was post- poned Friday by the City Com- mission. After a long argument among opponents and advocates of the change, the commission put off the second, final vote until its reg- ular meeting the morning of Jan. 7. It is proposed area from Zone to change the B (two-family residences) to Zone F (local re- Magnolia Petroleum Co. and Dr. J. P. Gibson asked for the change. Magnolia plans to put a service station on the southwest corner. Gibson plans to put com' mercial buildings on the north- west corner. The commission Friday adopted on final reading the re-zoning of Nwtk lint St. from St. to Grape St., and extending north- ward to the alley. That change is from Zone G to Zone H. Both are business zones, but H allows structures erected without the heretofore required setbacks and back yards. No objection was voiced Fnday to the North First St. change. Speaking against the proposed business zoning of the Grape and North Eighth Sts. intersection were: Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Free- man, 1634 Parramore Ave.; Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Roberjs: 2758 Jeanette St., who own residential property near the Freemans: Mrs. A. M. Willingham, 633 Victoria St., president of alley View Schwl P-TA, who opposed the zone change because of the school; Mr. and Mrs. Larry Cunningham, 760 Mulberry St.; C. B. Loe. North Eighth St. Their contention was that chang- hniinm mill would damage the value of the' residential property. Expressing approval of change to business zone were Jolt, LaBar, an official of Magnolia Pe troleum Co.; R. H. Scott, distric' manager of Magnolia; Ed Tic week and Newel Thompson, re. alters; Dr. ,T. P. Gibson, 162- North Eighth St.; and J. C. Bov den, 730 Grape St. The real estate men said the believed Grape St. will to be a business street and thr they already so consider it The; said it would be to the best in terest of the property owners then to change the zoning to business: so they could get more for the! property. Bowden said he dossn't know anyone who iuuay wants a home on Grape St. He thought it would be better for the owners to tare   

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