Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: December 8, 1954 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - December 8, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               Abilene 7- "WiTHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL. LXX1V, NO. TEXAS, WEDNESDAY EVENING, DECEMBER 8, 1954 -TWENTY-SIX PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS PRICE DAILY 5c, SUNDAY lOe Treaty 'Grave, Warlike', Red China Premier Says NO COMMENT ON McCARTHY Ike Says He'll Not Enter Personal Attacks, Quarrels ALL THEY HAVE De Baggis, 30, and his British war bride wife Maureen, 29, who cuddles their six-months-old baby daughter Diane, only child left after the parents lost four other daughters and their only son when their Franklin, Mass., home burned. The children were trapped in an upstairs bedroom when a kitchen'pil stove exploded. De Baggis wears bandages from injuries suffered in his frantic effort to save the five youngsters. Sheppard's Teeth Chipped, Dr. Says CLEVELAND W Dr. Samuel j Shcppard's dentist testified today Sheppard's teeth were chipped when he examined them 11 days after the murder of Marilyn Shep- pard. A piece of a tooth, .far, un- identified, was found .birieath the bed where Shcppard's wife was beaten to death July 4. Dr. Shep- pard is on trial for his life, ac- cused of killing her. Sheppard claims that he strug- gled with an unknown assailant in Burglar r15r Returned to Reformatory Parole of a 15-year-old Negro boy, who admitted an Abilene bur- glary, was revoked Wednesday morning by Judge Owen Thomas in Taylor County Juvenile Court. The boy was on parole from the State Youth Development Council reformatory at Gatesville. He had been released on parole last Jan- uary after admitting an earlier He had been placed in the custody of the council inde- finitely. Jack Landrum, assistant Taylor County juvenile officer, said the boy admitted the burglary of Gull Service Station, 942 Pine Thursday night. The boy took about cash, but of it was later returned to the owner The burglary thus solved is one of 20 which have occurred in Abi (ene during the period beginning with Thanksgiving Day. ie bedroom, and that he was locked unconscious there. The dentist, Richard E. Cook, aid he examined Sheppard's teeth uly 15. "The upper right cuspid and bi- lispid were loose and chipped." he aid. V Pieces of the teeth he estimated t to of an inch were missing ad Dr. Sheppard's mouth still as lacerated, he reported. Prosecution attorneys, cross-ex- imining, asked him to step down om the witness stand and ex- mine the accused man's teeth in ourt. He did so, and said they re not loose now. Preceding this witness. Dr. Clif- ird C. Foster, eye, ear, nose and iroat specialist, testified he ex- mined Sheppard on the afternoon f the murder. Like other witnesses, he de- cribed a swollen right cheek, a lack eye and a swelling at the acfc of the neck. THE WEATHER U.S.-DEPARTMENT OF COMMEfiCE WEATHER BUREAU ABILENE AND and colder today, tonyihi and Thursday. High today 55 in 60. low tonight 30 to 35, high Thursday in the 50's. NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS: Clear partly cloudy, cooler tonight and in north vest' this afternoon. Thursday fair cooler. Lowest 32-12 tonight. WEST TEXAS: Generally fair and cold er this and tonight. Thursday and "cool. Lowest 25-35 In Panhaodl and Sonth Plains and 3M4 elsewhere to "'EAST TEXAS: Mostly cloudy warmer thi-i afternoon, widely showers this afternoon and tonight. Clear inc and cooler tonicht and Thursday. SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS: Parti cloudy and warm this afternoon, a ft showers in northeast this afternoon. Cle; to partly cloudy and cooier ai rush and low tempsiatnrcs for 24 hour 57 for hour FOR CHRISTMAS GIVE A YEAR'S SUBSCRIPTION TO THI RIWRTfR-NIWS AT HOLIDAY RATM WASHINGTON President Eisenhower, dealing with ques- tions about Sen. McCarthy's attack on him, declared emphatically to- day he has no intention of indulg- ing in personal vituperation or quarrels. The President came up with a crisp No when asked for comment at hi? news conference on the Mc- Carthy attack. And, in what he did say later, Eisenhower never did mention Mc- Carthy by name. In this, the President was stick- ing to his repeatedly stated policy of refusing to talk about McCarthy as an individual. The first question put to Eisen- hower, at the crowded news con- ference, dealt with McCarthy's per- sonal attack. McCarthy yesterday accused the President of a "shrinking show of weakness" toward communism and of tolerance for Reds who torture impftsoned Americans. A reporter summarized McCar- thy's charges and then asked the President whether he cared to comment in view of what the news- man termed the personal nature of the criticism. The reporter also asked whether Eisenhower saw any danger to the Republican party in the McCarthy attack. After a moment's hesitation, the President shot uack briskly that the answer with respect to the first part of the he cared to comment in view of the personal nature of the criti- no. Eisenhower then added forceful- ly that he does not intend to in- dulge in personal vituperation or quarrels. Upheld Rights The President went en to say he always has upheld the right of congrtss to conduct investigations, and will continue to do so. As for the second part of the opening question, whether Eisen- hower saw any danger to the Re- publican party in the McCarthy attack, the President referred newsmen to Leonard W. Hall, chairman of the Republican Na- tional Committee. He suggested they ask Hall, what, in his opinion, the impact will be on the party By all signs, McCarthy decided deliberately on a break with the administration. It was no off-the- cuff remark, but a prepared-in-ad- :ance statement, when he lashed at the President yesterday. Asked about reports of a Cab- inet conflict on the extent of the Asian aid, the President said he knew of no subject that does not develop conflicting opinion. He added that specific needs of vari- ous countries had cot been laid out yet. has made no deci- sion about whether to seek a sec- ond term, but promised to take newsmen into his confidence on the subject sometime in the in- definite future. He made this com- mrr-t when askedjf he would run "in the face of a split party." _ "ATTACKS PRESIDENT Sen. Joseph McCarthy (R-Wis) is shown as he accused President Eisenhower of congratulating sen- ators who hold up exposure of communists and of urging toler- ance for Chinese communists who torture American soldiers. Compulsory Garbage Fee Stirs Up Collection Fight Absentee Vole MayTolalIZS The number of absentee votes cast here in the special Dec. 11 election to name a state senator from the 24th District may reach 125. Mrs. Chester Hutcheson, Tay- fexas Cotton Output Up WASHINGTON W-A 1954 Texas otton crop of bales, up from last month's estimate, ;as predicted today by the Agri- ulture Department. The department forecast a M- ional crop of bales. A yield per acre of 244 pounds a Texas and estimated acreage larvested of acres was n the forecast Up to Dec. 1, Texas had ginned bales, compared to 467 last year. Texas produced bales in .953 with a yield per acre of 233 pounds. The national forecast was the fi- ial report of the year. The national crop is for DOO bales of 500 pounds grow weight. This is bales more than ast month's forecast of t compares also with last year's crop of and with the ten- year (1943-52) average of 000. This year's crop was grown un- der rigid federal planting allot- ments and marketing quotas de- signed to prevent the addition of more supplies to a top-heavy sur- plus. The goal of the control pro- jram had been about 12 million jales. Similiar controls have been proposed for next year's crop. Supplementing this year's pro- duction is a carryover supply of bales from past big crops. The Texas crop was estimated at bales, grown on 000 acres which yielded an average of 244 pounds. The department estimated the yield at an average of 339 pounds per harvested acre compared with 324.2 pounds last year and 272.1 for the ten year average. It reported the acreage for har- vest at compared with last year and for the ten yearxaverage. The acreage abandoned before harvest was estimated at i per- cent at the acreage ta wlUvation m July 1. lor County clerk, said the total at her office was 123. In addition four ballots had been mailed, and two of these had been returned as of Wednesday morning. The ether two may be in the mail en route to her office, she said. Seventy eight people crowded Mrs. Hutcheson's office Tuesday the final day of absentee voting fill out ballots. Greek Plane Falls ATHENS, Greece Greek air force Dakota crashed in flames today at a military airfield near Athens, killing all 19 of its occu- pants, fifteen were Greek army lieutenants. City Water Department doesn't have authority to remove the com- pulsory city garbage collection fee from anybody's bill. That statement was made Wed- nesday morning by C. B. Hicks, water office manager, for benefit of who have pro- tested making the payment: He said some customers scratch the garbage charge off their bills and send checks for water service with that amount deducted. Others pay the garbage fee "under pro- test." Persons who fail to pay the gar- bage fee on the water bill will find the same fee put back on the bill the succeeding month and marked as Hicks said. For non-payment, the city may suspend the service. Then when it resumes, the city can charge a SI reinstatement fee. If the prem- ises have become so insanitary as to occasion additional work on the garbage collectors' part, the re- sumption fee is Compulsory Now A short time ago the City Com- mission voted to compel all resi- dential and business establish- ments to accept the city's garbage collection and disposal service. Members gave as the reason that many persons who heretofore had declined the service weren't doing their own disposal satisfac- America Warned To Quit Formosa LONDON Communist Premier Chou En- ai said tonight the United States government committed 'a grave warlike provocation" by entering a few days ago into a mutual security treaty with the Chinese Nationalists. Chou's bristling statement, broadcast by the Peiping radio, threatened that if the United States does not with- draw all its forces from Formosa, the Formosa Strait and Penghu Islands "and persists in interfering in China's in- ternal affairs, it must take upon itself all the grave con- sequences." Chou described Nationalist Generalissimo Chiang Kai- shek as "the .public enemy of the Chinese people." The broadcast, recorded here, quoted the Red Pre- mier as saying: "To liberate Taiwan (Formosa) and to liquidate the traitorous Chiang Kai-shek clique is a matter which falls entirely within the scope of China's sovereignty internal affairs and no-interference by any foreign country will be tol- erated. "Threats of war cannot shake the determination of the Chinese people to liberate Taiwan, they can It Low Level, ke Declares torily. Residential customers who hadn't been accepting the city's garbage service received their first bills for it in November, aft- er the new ordinance went into effect. Business establishments which CASH TOTALS Goodfeiiows Get Offers for Clothes hadn't been taking the service_arei requirement have been madi letting their first garbage feTbUls through higher city administrative j channels, for establishments where the city can't effectively handle the refuse disposal. Hicks report- this month. Garbage fees are included on the monthly bills from the City Water Department. Passed By Commission "The requirement that all places accept the city garbage service was made by the City Commis- sion in an Hicks stressed. "The Water'Departnient didn't adopt the rule, and it hasn't the power to remove the charge from anybody's account" Residential garbage accounts added when the new ordinance went into effect total Hicks reported. These will pay fees to- :aling about per month. Approximately 400 business es- ablishments were added, their to- tal monthly fees being around 000, Hicks said. A "few" exceptions to the city ed. The only exceptions he knew about are some heavy machinery produce houses and similar businesses. Refuse which the ex- cused places have is too volumi- nous or unwieldy for the city trucks to haul, he said. Establishments which made spe- cial arrangements with city ad- ministrators for exception from the garbage fee must show that they are properly handling their own refuse disposal, Hicks said. Some of those concerns have such a large amount of refuse that they must haul off many truck- loads daily. Others have scrap metal of sizes and wegihts the city trucks can't properly handle. Senators Continuing Defense Plant Probe only heighten the indignation of the Chinese people. "The Chiang Kai-shek clique of national betrayal has no authority whatsoever to conclude any treaty with any country. 'Null and Void' "The 'mutual security treaty' en- tered into between the United States and Chiang Kai-shek has no legal basis whatever and is null and void. "This treaty is betrayal o and territoria rights and is resolutely oppose Iby the .Chinese people." .Chou said the U. S. governmen had disregarded "repeated prc tests and warnings" by the Com munist Chinese about this treaty He added: "By this treaty, the U. S. gar ernment attempts to legalize its armed seizure of China's territory of Taiwan and, with Taiwan as a base, to extend its aggression against China and prepare a new ?ar." The broadcast came about the same time Foreign Secretary- Sir Anthony Eden was telling the Souse of Commons here Britaii hopes the Chinese Nationalists will promise to refrain from provoca- jve actions against the Comsnu- list mainland. Viewpoints vary in the Abilene area on how to produce smiles at Christmas. The Goodfellows believe they can make the needy smile by de- livering certain items a Christ- mas dinner, some clothing and toys. The plan of the Goodfellows works. A 70 year old Clyde woman discovered a different plan for making smiles. She gives, too. She said, "I find happiness in doing for others." Her letter arrived Wednesday morning. It was mixed in with many letters requesting help. She wrote: "Could you use clothing in fix- ing the Christmas boxes? "My husband passed away in March, so I had to do something, so God put it in my heart to help the underprivileged children. "I began buying prints and mak- ing them into dresses and shirts I have given away about 50 gar> ments, but yet have about 15 to give some needy children. "Now these are not made over It U all good material and for girls from 4 to S yean of age, and thirts for t to t "If you can use these, please let me know at once, where to deliver hem." New clothes may be turned into he. City County Welfare Depart- ment, while used clothes may be eft with the Salvation Army. Cash contributions may be sent o the Reporter-News. Less than one-fifth the minimum amount needed had been contributed by Wednesday morning. The latest contributors: 'reviously acknowledged S1006.37 Ace Abbott 5.00 Mrs. George E. Morris ......5.00 WASHINGTON IB The Mc- Carthy Senate Investigations sub- committee continues public hear- ings on possible Communist infil- tration of defense plants today, but with its chairman absent. Sen. McCarthy (E-Wis) left Washington yesterday after mak- ing a blistering statement critical of President Eisenhower. His office said he would be gone for a week or 10 days. His destination was not announced. Prospects were that the defense plant hearings would wind up to- morrow, much earlier than orig- inally had been indicated. Six witnesses, all from eastern Pennsylvania, were to be quizzed today. Sen. Mundt who presided' at yesterday's sessions, aid some of them would be from the Bethlehem Steel Co. plant in Bethlehem and some from other companies, The subcommittee heard three Fairmont Methodist Church 10.00 C. M. CaldweU 15.00 Mrs. Edith E. Dilti......... 5.00 Hubert G. Johnson............5.00 Mrs. J. A. Hutchison......... 5.00 Mrs. Joyce Poore 5.00 25.00 3.00 Mrs. D. D. Parramore Mrs .Gordon Ginocchio Theta Sigma Chapter- Beta Sigma Phi................. E. R. McDaniel 15.00 Mae Belle 10.00 V. C. Perini, Jr. k family 50.W Raymond Wray, D .C....... 10.0 Exchange Club............... 25.W Mae Kelley 10.0 Anonymous TOTAL plant yesterday. All were identi- fied as onetime Reds by Herman E. Thomas of AUentown, Pa., a former undercover agent for the FBI in the Communist party. Weak Front Hits; Low of 30 Possible A fast moving but weak cold front which moved through Abi- lene between 8 and a.m. Wed- nesday is expected to drop tem- peratures back from 30 to 35 Wed- nesday night Wednesday's high was expectec to be 55 or 60, after a Wednesday morning low of 49. Tuesday high was 67. The new cold front was reported to be "very killing any hopes employes from the Bethlehem' for possible rain in the area. Applicants Fail; Hew Police Test To Be Scheduled Another written examination for police applicants will be schedul ed by the city's Civil Service Com mission as soon as a sufficien number of msn apply to make i worthwhile. City Personnel Director Bernan Huett made that snnouncemen Wednesday. AH three applicants who were given a special examination Tues day failed to qualify, he said. TJr gent need to fill the six vacancies in Abilene Police Department was reason for giving the special tes without advance announcement. Freed TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras Julio Lozano, Honduras' new chie of state, has decreed an amnest for persons jailed in the las three years for crimes committed during election debates. WASHINGTON W-President El- said today be believes he fear of a giobd war is at a level now than at any timt i the last few years. The President was asked at ha ews conference whether he be- eved the chances of peace are righter than at any time since e took office two years ago. Eisenhower said be wanted differentiate between peace and an armistice, but stated he believes of a global war is less now than at any time since he went abroad to head ui the; North Atlantic Treaty -Organize lion. That wai in January at 1951. RWHH Jammed The old Indian treaty room where the President traditionally news conferees' was jam- mod with E.IXIOUS to qbiStich Eisenhower about Sen. McCarthy's charges weakness against con.munism. Eisenhower refused to make direct reply, .ecalling that he does not indulge ia personal vitupera- tion, but stands lor positive things while always upholding the right of Congress to investigate legiti- mate affairs in me executive :ranch. Asked about the statement by Paul M. Bnttei, the new Demo- national chairman, that Ei- senhower lacks the "capacity to ead and unite the American peo- the "President once again said not going to reply to an adividual attac'c dh'ectly. A Looking Glass Bui he declared in a flrm TOice that he had heard such charges jefore and that too olten look into a looking .glass instead o< a window. Covering many other subjects, the President tad these things say on other mattors: Atoms for a tbe first anniversary of his talk before the United Nations asking an "atoms for peace" international arrangement Eisenhower said that at his re- quest Secretary of State Dulles will give out later a record of the. things done under that proposal. While they are below expectations, the President added, they COB- stitute a considerable acconiplaij- ment. Meetiag MMday Administration program Monday, Eisenhower will meet with Republican congressional leaders to discuss tbe administra- tion's 1955 program and the neces- sary changes brought about by ex- periences this year. The President did not elaborate on the word, "ex- periences." In the elections last month, the Democrats won central of Congress. Eisenhower win meet Tuesday. with leaders of both man and ranking Democrats on Foreign Relations, Armed Ser- vices, and Appropriations Commit- go over such things as foreign'aid, foreign policy and na- tional security. WELCOME TO Department of Public Safety chief. Col. Homer Garrison (center) is welcomed to Abilene by J. D. Perry Jr. for the Abilene Chanter of Commerce (right) and Highway Patrol Capt. George Morahan of Abilene. Garrison was here as keynote speaker at a dinner honoring J. C. Warlick, Abilene truck driver, at the Woolen Hotel noon today. Warlick ww honored for courtesy on the high- wayi. (Staff photo) A   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication