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Abilene Reporter News: Friday, December 3, 1954 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - December 3, 1954, Abilene, Texas                                 r"  Gin Th# United Woj?  Sbilme 3Biporter  "WITHOUT OR WIIH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES"—Byron  EVENINR  FINAL  VOL. i.XXlV, \0. 167 Assorinu^dPrPssfAP) ABILENE, TEXAS. FRIDAY F.VENING, DECEMBER 3, 1954 -TWENTY-TWO PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS  PRICE DAILY 5c. SUNDAY 10c  $1.000 DOLL ON DISPLAY TONIGHT . . . laiipy clothes; hair that grows  .000 Doll Aids  rippled Children  P<  t'  i  I’.,  n  <;  ail'  t.i (.I'liiMMi got the first I I v\ I '11 xas Dull Show  .i.îi'rnuiiii whan Uie doors of \\ "¡''.ii: s Uuildinu at the Fair k s'.MHii’. (>]ien ior them at 1;30  \' t !!ii]v did thev yet to see the ihev eat a Sl.OOO doll— ' :=•! IHMt It tiroiU'lii. ah'i'-'in doll, clothing and  all, was pre.sented by Mrs. Belle Kimbrough of Merkel,  Four .\bilene business firm.s — The Abilene Heporter-N'ews, Citizens National Bank, Farmers and Merchants National Bank and We.'it Texas I'tilities Co. - put in $250 each to purchase the doll for $1,000.  The SI.000 went — not to Mrs.  SUNDAY HEADLINERS IN THE REPORTER-NEWS  \ laiik\ hoy clinibcd into a flivver and left Abilene to . k 111- roTtune about 25 year.s ago . . . well, read ..bm { luin in Sundny'.s Reporter-News.  !•’ u! ;d T) about politie.s and of the men who are 111: lh(' pus! left vacant by the death of Sen, Ilarley  O-f  t-'.l t la k-a bve-bab> new.s of the big event—the West Doll Sh i\\ sponsored by The Reporter-News and ( i.\ j.aiks department will be pictured in the alabii style of Staff Photographer Don Hutcheson ■. ritt('ti up by the Reporter-News Woman's Depart-  S,“0  ill ■ a <<i  C(-  uu max fi serve extra copies of Sundav’s Reporter-s with \our agent or nearest newsstand, for 10  'I HAVE SIX BOY  Heartaches Fill Goodfellow Mail  1. I  ■. i  i><  k  ■;K VOI! ha\e trouble.s,’  '* e>,if tnrnuzh .seme of the I (in M»' 'i:KKdtdlew desk.  (> te, Il I. >,(iihbled in lì on ' lii'ip i.'dìh'f paper, the \-.;i 'Jet at ‘.tie dime store Mie in ve on!v 'Mr. (loodfel-wri ten on the etneiope. But leairh then de.shnutiuli, even  Th( e letters aren't remarkable Inr .sO.ie or ^',rammar, unless it’s III* (CK of them B.io wiien you read through the paiiituliv careful handwriting, the «1 u (    \ HI find they tel! a story  t» d I’nai Ks Dickens never equaled fnr p.'ilhos,  N > d! of them are pleading lette- ine wrih'rs know they (lon't h \ to ill K fi lini the Coodfellows.  '1 is. Mi ph* ity i.s elo(pienl.    i  “iH ir Mr. (oKxitellows. My j n.Miu' is    .1 work at -    ■    I  Ah wile IS    ,    housewife. 1|  »..I    I i)o\    "    ■  1 s i‘nou,gh for the GotKlfel- ' lows    ^    I  fell, .since you can't see the iMi'n . the [lovcrty ol the i-i-'itninorv a letter like this is vuid;    |  • I), i' I les, 1 am writing to s<-e ^ 'f \ ,    il! would give my children i  s'Hi"' loss and food for Christmas. ■ \\    11 id two sick babies. I've  in » ocen out of the hospital about 7 wi'ck--. -My husliand don't get to vo'k    verv .steady.    We have    five  tori-;    one ;.-oy. They    would    appre-  ( It    ,n 'hint you    would    give  Thanking    you    very  Previously atlcnow lodged New gifts included:  Anonymous .      $25    00  Anonymous    .,    .,    2.5.00  Refrigeration Suppy and Fleet nc Co Mr .and Mrs. Adams Traveling Men's  Wives Club    ____  LaMoyna VVismer ......... 3    00  Euna Dora Andrews ...... 3.00  TOTAL: ................. 622    .50  540 .50  5 (K)  5.00  10.00  Kimbrough — but to the Taylor County Society tor Crippled tihil-dren, Hehahilitation Center, to be used in any way they see fit.  To Give Wardrobe  The doll, too, goes to the Re-i habilitation Center. Airs Kimbrough .said she wanted to supply it with a wardrobe so the children could use it in learning to dre.ss and undress themselves. Whi-n not in use, the doll will be kept in a glass case at the Rehabilitation Center, maiked with the name of the donors, Mrs. Kimbrough and the firms.  The doll is on display at the Doll j Show, one of many major attrac tions ready when the show formally opened at 4 p m.  Fight WVst Texas women began the job of judging the dolls at 10 a.m. P’riday. The judges are Mr.s, Charles Grigg.s and Mrs. Charles L, .Nunn of Swectw.afer, Mr-‘ Bailey Post and Airs, I, E. Lo\'(‘Iace of .Stamford, .Mrs. Roy G i’haiiman and Mrs Shy Osborne of Cisco and Mrs E M Casey and Mrs Murry Russ of Alliany  3    5.000 Iteins  .Approximately 5.000 items —-dolls and their ac('Pssorie.s —- are on display at the show Scott Fikes, parks superintendent who is in charge of the staging, t'stimat-ed  The exliiliits will be oiien until 9 pm. tonight, from 9 am. to 9 p m. Saturday and from 2 p ni, to 9 pm Sunday  .Announcememt of the inircha.se of the gift doll for the benefit of crippled children wa.s made joint-j ly at noon tiKlay by Howaial Mc-! Mahon, publisher of The Abilene Reporter - News: Hud Wilson, vice j president and cashier of Citizen.s I Bank; Walter Johnson, president of ; P'&M Bank and Price Campbell, i president of WTCC 1 -Actual value of the doll is e.sti-j mated at up to about .$,500. It has  ! .See DOIJ.S, Fg. 8-A, Col. 3  vSale of old Municipal Airport land to the county for a livestock-agricultural center w'as re-set Friday by the City Commis.sion for Dec. 17.  Bid - opening was originally slated Dec. 10, but City Atty. Alex Bickley got the commis.sion to IKXstpone it until proper field notes could be completed.  Bickley announced at Friday morning’s session that field notes have been finished.  Time required for advertising for bids made Dec. 17 the earlie.st pos-.sible legal date for the sale.  The city plans to .sell about 130 acres of the old airport east of town to the county. Roughly 101 acres will be a site for the county li\est(Hk - agricultural center. About 29 acres will con.stitute right - of - way for the new route of State Highway 36.  For $65,000  Some lime ago the City Commission told (he County Commissioners’ Court it would be willing to ■sell the 130-acre tract for "approximately $<)5,fK>0”  Taylor Countians Ln the meantime have authorized in an election the bonds necessary to finance the land purchase and the con.struction of the center.  The bid - opening will take place during the commission’s regular Dec. 17 meeting, which begins at 9 a.m.  In its advertising the city reserves the right to reject any or all bids.  Water Line Bids  The commission Friday received bids for constructing water and sewer lines east of town to serve the Thunderliird Motor Hotel and water lines to Crow Addition.  ,\11 bids were held over for study of City Water and Sewer Engineer Howard Kelly and City Manager Austin P. Hancock. The city manager is out of town for a few day.s,  Kelly said later that he had discovered some inaccuracies in the fir.sl tabulation of bids and was trying to correct them. He stated that his original estimate had been the job would cost $42,000, and that apparently the low'est bid will coiiie within that amount.  The commission also:  ' I' Discussed the forthcoming sale of $2.85 million worth of the recently voted $6,65 million in city bonds, to be held next Tuesday at 2 p m. at City Hall.  '2» Agreed that the city will pay .$,50 damages to U. S. Philley for damages to his land west of Mc-Murry College by the city’s contractor in laying a water line. Philley said the equipment dragged off good topsoil and replaced it w'ith a poorer type.  i3> Ordered advertising of bids, to be opened Dec. 17, for sale of .14 acre of land east of town, Texas & Pacific Railway wishes to buy the land in order to extend a passing track there.  <41 .Appointed W. D, Minter, civic leader, to the Abilene * Taylor County Child Welfare Board to succeed John A. Deffebach, Dec. 31.  .Minter’s appointment was rec-ommend("d by Deffebach, the board chairman, to succeed himself. Deffebach’s term ends Dec. 31.  T eenager Admits Burglaries Here  RESCUED—Capt. Peter Carey, pilot of Northeast Airlines DC-3 which crashed into snowcapped peaks near Berlfn, N.H., Tuesday on routine flight from Boston to Berlin, is carried to waiting ambulance after helicopter rescue Thursday. Two of the seven persons aboard plane were killed, and the remaining five spent more than 40 hours at scene of crash.  Blood Transfusion Value Explained to 225 Delegates  Sentenced to Pen  Dec. 3 'ift — Prison 5 and 15 years were  WACO, terms of  a.s.se.ssed four Dallas men con-victwi yesterday of robbing the First National Bank of Streetman, Tex.  Angelo's Hardeman Likes It After Morning as Governor  t  i): |.'  (J ("i'r.'*'. (K'i'a.'ion¡dly a letter ( ,    ,    (    h^.l^ ucN mixixl into the  (, ) i i iJhiws mail.  ,u'    'lied    being a    goinl boy.  I    I ■    yuM 1C;1    Well,    Bill proh-  a'Jv (ti ‘ -n’t need to a.sk help of  I., ‘ Í iMOth'j'OW.",  L,i! NO ir;,tny otiiers do \    1    it t    ic\    to get    help, the  C.    MKifelh.'Ws inust    have    money to  »Lpply *'■  ACSTIN liiP-Sen Dorsey Hardeman. 51. who came to Texas from Tennessee 22 years ago today, became governor for a day and said today he believed he could "gel uschI to the job" on a permanent basis.  Hardeman, from San Angelo lamous for voting "no.” is president pro tern of the Senate and third in line ot suece.ssion as governor.  Gov. Shivers and Lt. Gov. Ben Ramsey both were out of the state.  With his wite, two young sons, and 6i) other relatives, triends, slate officials and employees on hand. Hardeman look the oath from Judge Lloyd Davidson of the Court of Criminal .Appeals.  Hardeman said he thought he was correct in believing he is the first man from Tennessee since Sam Houston to .serve as governor of Texas. Houston, a president of the Republic of Texas, was governor in 18,59-61.  Hardeman issued a proclamation declaring Dec. 15 as “bill of rights day” in Texas. He talked of the importance of constitutional government. and declared water is the state’s biggest problem.  "The one big interest I have is the water conservation program." Isaid Hardeman, chairman of the  state'.s Water Resources Commit- in the House of Representatives, tee wliich has been studying the resigning in 1942 to enlist as a  proiilem 15 months He .said the eommittee has formulated a program for the Legislature in January.  Hardeman said one aspect of the conservation program is the pro-}K)sed con.struction of Diablo Dam  private in the .Army. He was discharged as a captain in 1946 and was elected to the Senate that  year.  Hardeman’s wife attended his news conference, but he said he wasn’t worried about her telling  ; at the mouth of Devil's River near him w'hat to say. She has laryn ! Del Rio,    ghis.  He said he hopes that will tie “Did the same thing last Christ-in with development of a vast rec- mas. Must be the excitment.’’ she reational area extending some 3,50 said hoarsely, miles east and west and 100 to 150^ Hardeman faced a busy dav of  ;    ajJThe'm    “BejS    checking the  heavy volume of papers and cor-  Harrieman suggested that a high- S respondence. way network .should be developed j He said Shivers told him "there and recreational facilities expand-j are lots of headaches attached to ! ed to lure tourists to Garner State; the job.”  I INirk, the Devil’s Sink Hole. Frio! The swearing in was witnessed ' State Park. Big Bend National; ly his parents. Mr. and Mrs. N. B. Park and B.a!morrhea State Park. | Hardeman, Memphis, Tenn.: his The Devil’s Sink Hole is a vast i wife’s mother. Mrs. Lula Moore, cavern in Edwards County near j Eldorado, two sisters-in-law and Rocksprings    I    their husbands. Dr. and Mrs Arch  Hardeman, who was an assi.stant' Carson. Big Spring, and Mr. and attorney general of Tennessee be- Mrs. Joe Kreklow, Eldorado: and ! fore graduating from Vanderbilt a niece, Miss Juy Carson, Big ' in 1929. said he came to Texas "to Spring,  ' retain mv health" after suffering i His wife an sons, .Mark. 8, and from tuberculosis in 1929-32.    Bryan.    6. posed with Hardeman  Blood and the ways in which it is iLscd to save lives and speed recovery was the chief topic on the Windsor Hotel’s mezzanine Friday.  Occasion was the fifth annual meeting of the Texas Association of Blood Banks, which drew 225 delegates and speakers from all over the state and the U. vS,  They represented physicians, surgeons, technicians, nurses, and administrators working in the comoarativelv new field of blood banking, which has developed mostly since World War II.  From Far Away  Value of the bliKKi banks was stressed by speakers who came from as far as Washington, D, C., Denver. Memphis, Tenn., and Rochester. Minn. A Managua, Nicaragua, blood bank head also was present.  Dr T. H Seldon, anesthetist and director of the blood bank at Rochester’s famed Mayo Clinic, is enthusia.stic about his work. He spoke at the morning session.  "It is felt that convalescence of many patients is hastened by the use of transfusions,” he said. "Always having blood ready for emergencies has no doubt saved many lives"  Most surgeons nowadays plan to have an emergency supply of his patient’s tyi>e filood (mi hand during an operation. Dr. Seldon said.  Success of an operation depends always on the complete cooperation of pathologists, surgeons, internists. anesthetists and all others involved, he pointed out.  RecoKntee Value  "Anestheti,sts in Texas recognize the value of blood tran.s-fusions.” the Minnesota anesthetist said during an interview.  Direction of a blood bank is not confined .solelv to pathologists, he pointed out. Many physicians whth specialties in other fields of medicine take charge of the banks.  Dr Donald L Paulson, assi.'tant professor of thoracic surgery at the University of Texas Southwe.st-ern Medical School in Dallas, pointed out the importance of available blood supply in his field of surgery.  In many cases, chest surgery would be impossible without the blood banks, Dr, Paulson said.  "I would place it next to anes- niques in blood transfusion may thesia in importance to making make "much more” possible in  modern chest surgery possible, he said.  "Many procedures which we use today originally were devised ' during the early part of the century but were discarded due to lack of blood transfusions,” he said.  Sew Techniques  New transfusion techniques have made jxissible the sensational new "cross-circulation” operation in which a child’s circulatory .system may I>e connected with a parent’s while heart surgery is proceeding, Dr. Paulson pointed out.  And even more improved tech-  Ibe future, he said.  Dr. Seldon, who is past president (in 1949) of the American Association of Blood Banks, which ! was organized in Dallas in 1946, complimented the Texas Association on its work.  Newest phase of the Texas group's operation, the blood clearing house, was described by Miss Marjorie Saunders, who has been secretary of both groups since their founding.  Doctors at the meeting gave ; Miss Saunders credit for founding  See BLOOD, Pg. 8-A, t'ol. $  BUT STILL GRAVE  Pape's Canditian Is 'Satisfactary'  THE WEATHER  r S. DEP4RTMEVT OF COMMERC E WEATHER Bl HEAl  ABILENE A.NT) VICIMTV Clear to parll.v cloudy and mild today, tonorht and Saturday. High today near 75. I^ow tonight 45 High Saturday 65-70.  .NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS ~ Fair through Saturday. A little warmer thi* afternoon.  WUST TEXAS- Fair through Saturday. No important changea.  EAST TEX A.S-Partly Cloudy through Saturday. A little warmer in north and center.  SOI TH ( ENTRAL TEXAS—Conaiderable clw*liness through Saturday, Some light rain likely in south.  High and low temperalurea for 24 hours ended at b 30 a m 67 and 46 degree* TEMPFRATl RES  VATICAN CITY UB-The Vatican called the PtH>e’s condition satisfactory today, but renewed anxiety for his life was emphasized in reports on the severity and range of his ailments.  Roman Catholic.s throughout the world were joined in prayers for recovery of Pope Pius XII. His closest associate, Msgr. Giovanni Batista Montini, went to his bedside in the Vatican palace.  The Vatican disclosed officially that the 78-year-old pontiff had received treatment for "peritoneal irritation attended by abdominal tension.” This condition is an irritation of the lining to the abdominal cavity. It reflected the Pope’s long struggle against a gastric disorder accompanied by spells of hiccuping and nausea.  Nothing Alarming The bulletin of the Pope’s physician, Dr. Riccardo Galeazzi-Lisi, said X-ray and clinical examination made yesterday afternoon showed nothing alarming. Vatican sources said privately that an ulcer was a complicating factor. There were conflicting reports  rhurs  63 66 66  64 62  53  51  49  48  48  P. M  En.  He was elected mavor of San  i Angelo in 1936, won three term« tion papers.  for pictures as he signed proclama-  5;3«   .....2:30    ......  3:30    ........   .....4:30    ........   .......5:30    ......    6»    ........   .......7:30    .......    8:30    ....    9:30    ......  ...    10:30  11:30  12:30    .    ...  •Sunruie t<»<?»y 7:24 a.m. Sunset tonight 5 33 pm.  Barometer reading at    12    30    p.m. 28 la.  ReUtivt    iuuDkiitir at    UiSO    R.n.  A M 47  46  47 49 JT 40 49  82  bo  70  72  Have You Placed Your Want Ad For The Weekend  If you've forgotten to call in that Wont Ad for the coming weekend, do it now' Your Wont Ad —even though it is little in size !S a big thing to forget.  'You won't wont to miss onnounce-ing your product, service or wont to the 147,683 doily readers of The Abilene Reporter-News. It con mean loss of profits, loss of rent, not finding thot lost article etc  A Wont Ad is a big thing to remember. So, diol 2-7841 now ond let one of our friendly od fakers help you form your od. Word ods ore received doily until 4 P. M. except Saturdoy when 12:00 noon is the deadline. Space ads will be received until 12:00 noon Fridoy for Sunday publication.  Cali now! The number is 2-7841.  about the condition of the Pope’s heart, but it was emphasized that he came through the night “relatively tranquilly.”  Early last night, s(X>n after the Pope took a turn for the worse, a Vatican press spoke.sman said the pontiff had suffered a heart collapse. Later the Vatican omitted references to the heart. However, unconfirmed reports were heard that he had suffered a lighter, second heart attack during the night.  No More Bulletins After i.s.suance of the physician’s bulletin at noon (6 a.m. EST) the Vatican press office said a further bulletin could not be expected for several hours.  Suspect Held By Police af Brownwood  By EARLE WALKER  Abilene city police Friday ex» ppctt‘d to solve during the day some or all of the recent burglaries through questioning of a suspect .  A teen - age Abilene Negro boy, arrested within che past 24 hours at Brownwood. has reportedly stated to Hrownwofxl jxilice that he committed several burglaries here, BrownwiKKl police told local officers that the youth admitted doing one burglary Thursday night.  Capt. W. B. McDonald and Lt. George Sutton, Abilene police detectives, said Brownwood police picked up the Negro on general suspicion.  To Pick lip Suspect  Lt. Sutton was going to Brownwood Friday to return the suspect here.  Gulf Service Station, 942 Pine St.. was burglarized here Thursday night of about $26 cash. This was the 13lh burglary reported since Thanksgiving, including those during the Thanksgiving holiday.  "We feel sure the suspect in custody yvill be connected with th« Gulf station burglary,” said Capt. McDonald.  The station break - in was the only one reported for Thursday night, up to noon Friday.  A screw driver was believed used to open a rear window of the station. Police think the burglar departed. Police think the burglar burglar took about $20 from the cash register, and also took from the I'cgister the keys to a drink box. With these keys he succeeded in opening the candy - vending machine, from which he stole about $6. police said.  Closed 1.3 Hours Detective 1,1. Sutton said the station closed for the night at 6 p.m. Thursday, and re - opened at 7 a m. P'riday. The manager. F. C, Adams, discovered the burglary Friday morning at opening time. The following other places have been burglarized here during the Thanksgiving holiday and from that date to the pre.sent: Thornton’s Department Store, South Fourth and Oak Sts.; Dewey Collum’s apartment, 14i7 .South Third St.; Neely-Barnes Clothiers, 257 Pine St.; Savage-Fishel clothing store, 1080 North Second St.; Landau Courts, 542 South 11th St.; Panhandle Service Station, 802 Oak St.; Robinson Pharmacy, 3101 South 14th St.; Gulf Oil Corp.’s warehouse, 542 Plum St.; D&VV Tire Co., 102 Elm St.; Taylor’s Men’s Store. 717 Legett Dr.; Veterans of Foreign Wars Club, 2250 North First St.; and Lewis Cafe. 625 Plum St.  $2.500 Taken Loot of more Uian $2,500 value (cash and merchandise» was taken in the series of burglaries.  McDonald and Sutton said Friday morning that the youth in custody at Brownwood may be of juvenile age. He has been picked up numerous times in the past by officers, they said his record on file shows.  DuPont Monopoly Case Is Dismissed  CHICAGO U.S. Dist. Judge tition from makers of similar pr* Walter J. Labuy today dismissed ! ducts.  the government’s civil antitrust suit against the duPont interests, General Motors Corp. and the United States Rubber Co.  Judge Labuy held that the government had "failed to prove conspiracy, monopoiizaiion, a restraint of trade, or any reasonable probability of a restraint."  The government’s civil suit was against E. I. du Pont de Nemours and Co., the General Motors Corp.,  I the U.S. Rubber Co., three Du Pont holding companies and 33 members of the Du Pont family.  The government asked the judge, who heard the long trial without a jury, to force the Du Fonts to dispose of their stock interest in General Motors and U S. Rubber.  Government attorneys claimed the Du Fonts bought General Motors and U. S. Rubber stock so Du Pont products could be sold to tbos« hug« firms with little comp«-  The Du Fonts contended the' bought the stock in the two com panies because the purchases were good investments, and asserted Du Pont salesmen had to hustle for whatever business they got from General Motors and LIS. Rubber  111;   

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