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Abilene Reporter News: Saturday, November 20, 1954 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - November 20, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               Abilene EVENING "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL. LXXIV, NO. 154 Associated Press (AP) ABILENE. TEXAS. SATURDAY NOVEMBER 20, 1954- "PAG I S SECTION! PRICE DAILY 5c, SUNDAYHk Troop Report Spices Talks WASHINGTON tR-Reports that the Communists have assembled three new divisions in North Viet Nam focused fresh importance on a communique to be issued today at the close of top level French- American talks. French Premier Mendes-France and Secretary of State Dulles held a lengthy huddle on the matter yesterday, authoritative inform- ants said, but so far there has been no official hint on how the two nations propose to meet the reported new threat. The communique also was watched for any indications of how close .Mendes-France and Dulles came to agreement during face-to- face talks this week on Indochina, European and North African problems. Final Meet Set A final Dulles-Mendes-France meeting on "odds and ends" was set for this morning before the French leader's scheduled air de- parture for New York. Mendes-France and Dulles met for yesterday afternoon, virtually finishing their three-day review ol 22 topics ranging around the globe. Among other things, the report- ed creation of three new Viet mmh divisions and movement o: heavy military gear into Red-helc North Viet Nam in violation o! the Geneva peace agreement said to have been discussed b> the Fr e n c h and American dip lomats. The three new divisions would boost the Vietminh total to 11. Two of the new units were saic to be armored. New Offensive? This new development, it was said, raises the possibility of nev offensive intentions by the Reds either through direct military moves or threatened action aimed at bringing pressure to bear against non-Communist South Viel Nam. Dulles and Mendes-France wen understood to have agreed in large part on political and militarj steps to deal with the situation. The political steps reportedly, in eluded ways and means of deve! oping an, effective "anti-Communis government in South Vietnam anc agricultural reform. The milita: measures involve use of availabl military equipment in the south t train and arm units of a nativ anti-Communist army. U. S. Aid Unsure The extent to which a 342-ma: U. S. Military mission in South Vie Nam would participate in or direc the training program has not bee fully resolved, informants said. is regarded apparently as a del cate question. The bulk of the conference tim was understood to have been de voted to Far East problems, a though the French and America leaders were reported to hav Iked about France's troubles ith North Africa, Nationalists nd about Franco-German rela- ons, particularly in relation to e dispute over the coal-rich Saar- nd. Diplomatic informants said Men- es-France has shown a consider- >le degree of agreement with .S. points of view. Dulles was said to have told lendes-France he hopes French lilitary forces in North Africa ould avoid using U.S. arms in ghting Nationalists. But the sec etary of state apparently did not ireaten to cut off military aid i! lis were not done. Mendes-France. was reported i< ave told Dulles the French plan o reductions during 1955 'rench commitments under the Atlantic pact. However, lendes-France was quoted as say ng he felt there should be some hifts in troop assignments ategories of arms and defense orces. There have been reports he French might send some roops now on NATO duty to the Vorth Africa trouble spots. Rest, Checkup Due Actress Judv Gorlonc HOLLYWOOD, w-Actress Jtid Garland is in Cedars of I.ebano Hospital for a checkup and a res Dr. Frederick Pobirs1 said sh was admitted yesterday and w remain although he condition is satisfactory. Atoms for Peace Plan Due Okay MRS. TED CHRISTY dies after two years in iron lung MRS. CHRISTY, 27, DIES 'Iron Lung' Baby's Mother Loses 2-Year Polio Battle Mrs. Ted Christy, who gave birth .0 her second daughter in an iron ung, lost her two-year battle with polio Friday night at o'clock when she died in Hendrick Memor- al Hospital. Mrs. Christy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Blackwood of Tus- cola, was stricken with bulbar and spinal polio on Oct. 14, 1952. She would have been 27 years old next Saturday. She was taken to Hendrick and placed in an iron lung. Two months on Dec. 10, her second daughter, Bonnie Jeanne, was born, the first "iron lung baby" to arrive at Hendrick. Returned to Abilene Mrs. Christy was taken to the polio center in Houston in Febru- ary, 1953, and had received treat- ment there and at Gonzales Warm Springs Foundation until she re- turned home to Abilene last Aug- ust. Her husband, who had operated the Key City Glass and Mirror Co. here, gave up his business and took a job in Houston to be near his wife. The Christy family had made their home at 1957 South Third St. since returning to Abilene. Mrs. Christy was taken to the hospital Nov. 3. She had spent at least part of every day in iron lung ever since being strick- en with the illness. Born Nov. 27, 1927, at Tuscola, she was the former Maggie Mae Blackwood. A 1944 graduate of Tuscola High School, she was mar- ried to Mr. Christy on April 5, 1946. She had worked for the Report- er-News and the Farmers and Merchants Bank in Abilene. Survivors include her husband; two daughters, Karen, 4, and Bon- nie, almost 2; her parents; one brother, Len Blackwood, Abilene fire marshal; and two sisters, Mrs. Cecil Bellew, 1110 Hickory St., and Mrs. Doyle Riddle of Tus- cola. Funeral will be held Monday at 10 a.m. in the Kiker-Warren Funeral Home chapel. Burial will be in Tuscola Cemetery. Morse to Press for Censure If This Session Doesn't Vote WASHINGTON WV-Sen. Morse (Ind-Ore) said today that a reso- lution to censure Sen. McCarthy (R-Wis) would be reoffered in the next Congress if necessary hut that "the American people are go- ing to demand a vote" by the present Senate. "This issue, in a sense, is out of the hands of the Senate, Morse said in an interview. "The people are demanding that the members of the Senate stand up and be counted" before the Dec. 24 ad- journment deadline previously set by Congress. Morse, who bolted the Republi- can party during the 1952 presi- dential campaign, is one of the three senators who filed 46 charges considered by a special bipartisan senate committee that unanimous- ly recommended McCarthy be cen- sured. Will Rise Later A friend of McCarthy's, Sen. Mundt likewise indicated in a separate interview he expects the censure issue to crop up in the next Congress if this one doesn't act. But he predicted a vote with- in a week or 10 days after the Senate reconvenes a from Monday. Hunt for Girl, 11, Turns to Missouri MOUNT VERNON. Mo.. search for the missing 11-year-old Jeannette Earnest, who was kid- naped in Fort Worth, Tex., Tues- day and who officers fear has been killed, turned to the area along U.S. Highway 66 across Missouri today. The girl's uncle. Thurman Priest, 48. Grand Prairie, Tex., was ar- rested at a tourist court here Wednesday night and has been charged with kidnaping the girl. E. N. Buie of the Fort Worth j Sheriffs Criminal Investigation Di- j vision said Priest insists he can't t remember details about his trip from Texas and has denied know- ing anything about the girl's dis- appearance. Buie said Priest voluntarily agreed to take a truth serum test last night but the serum had little effect. The search for the girl turned to Missouri. Buie said, because of a report that a man who registered as Priest and "wife" checked in at a Baxter Springs. Kan., tourist court at 4 a.m. Wednesday. Buie reported the tourist court operator, who saw only the man, said he asked to he called at 10 a.m., but the cabin was vncated by 6 a.m. Kansas officers reported the bed showed two persons had occupied it. Baxter Springs is in southeast Kansas. Buie said Priest checked in alone at a tourist court in Stanton, Mo., about 50 miles from St. Louis, at 3 p.m. that day. Priest appeared here, in southwest Missouri, at 7 p.m. Wednesday and called his wife about an hour later. She notified officers and his arrest followed. Sheriff Vernon Smith of Mount Vernon said some of Jeannette's text books were found in 'Priest's is accused of picking up the girl near her home while she was waiting for her mother. Buie said the abductor was seen at a tourist court at Irving, Tex He said a girl identified by the proprietor, Mrs. Mildred Page, as Jeannette was with him. Bloodstains and one of the child's earrings were found in the cabin according to 29. McCarthy's condition was reported "a little improved" yesterday. A doctor said the elbow bruise, inflicted when a well-wisher shoved it against a glass top table last weekend, had been "aggravated considerably because the senator probably continued to use the arm four or five days after his original injury." "I'd think from McCarthy's iewpoint he would be glad to get t washed Mundt said. "If t isn't, it will just be reaetiv- led at the next session." Sen. Wafkins chair- nan of the special six-member ommittee which recommended censure, said he "wouldn't specu- ate" on whether the censure reso- ution would be reintroduced in the text Congress if the Senate failed o act on it before adjournment. Predicts Vote "1 think the Senate will get to a ,rote." Watkins said. With McCarthy hospitalized for .he treatment of an injured elbow, :he Senate voted 76 to 2 Thursday :o recess its temper-fraying debate on the censure issue until Nov. 29. The session began Nov. 8. The Senate received a report from Dr. George W. Calver, the :apitol physician, that McCarthy had developed "traumatic bur- sitis" in his right elbow and could suffer "permanent injury" if he 2 Giant New Atomic Plants Nearly Ready OAK RIDGE, Tenn. (Si The government is nearing completion of two huge atomic plants which already have greatly increased the nation's production of fissionable U233 for atomic and hydrogen weapons. The two plants, costing nearly one billion dollars, are additions to existing installations here and at Paducah, Ky. A third facility now under construction near Ports- mouth, Ohio, will add substantially to our The three installations produce U235 by what is called the gaseous diffusion process. This is a method of separating fissionable U235 from natural uranium. In Final Stages The Atomic Energy Commission declined comment on progress of the three-pronged construction pro- gram, but it was learned reliably today that the Oak Ridge and Pa- ducah facilities are in their final building stages. The Portsmouth plant was projected two years ago as a 4-year job. An authoritative source said the plants include 'a vast amount of in- formation gleaned from operation of the original U235 facility here which began production in Feb- ruary, 1945. When the program was approved by Congress in July, 1952, the then chairman of the AEC, Gordon H. Dean, said: To Gain Time "The purpose of this expansion program is to gain precious time by achieving minimum stockpile objectives established by the De- partment of Defense, and to achieve them about 4Vi years ear- lier than we would achieve them if we went at our present rate." Dean told Congress time was a key factor in developing a family of atomic weapons for use by the armed services. The government now has more than a billion dollars invested in the gaseous diffusion facility here. It is a sprawling plant covering hundreds of acres. When completed, it will consume AFTER PET IS KILLED Schoolmates Give Pennies for Puppy MEDIA, Pa. look of sheer joy on the face of 11-year-old Harriet Taylor was worth every penny her schoolmates had donated to get her a new puppy. On Thursday, the fifth grade at Eddystone, Pa., school watched Harriet fight back her tears when she learned her dog, Pepper, had keen killed by an auto. Yesterday, the youngsters handed Harriet a cigar box containing in nickels, pennies and dimes. A happy Harriet went to the Society for the Preven- tion of Cruelty to Animals here, plunked down the cigar box and walked out with a brown and white puppy. The next step is a contest in the fifth grade of her school to find a name for Pepper's replacement. SAM SUGGESTS IT 'Spurned Lover1 Marilyn's Slayer? CLEVELAND a spurned "potential" lover- with a sadistic sense of satisfaction have killed pregnant Marilyn Sheppard in a state of frenzy? That was a question raised by Dr. Samuel H. Sheppard in a po- lice statement read late yesterday at his first degree murder trial. The 30-year-old osteopath is ac- cused of killing his 31-year-old wife in the bedroom of their suburban Bay Village home last July 4. The statement, which also touched on "other women" in the case, was read to the tense-court room by Detective F Schottke, the first Cleveland po- liceman to reach the murder scene. Words Jump Out For the most part the statement, taken last July 10, had been a recital of events already disclosed. Then, as the slender officer read swiftly, these words sudden- 16 billion kilowatt hours of elec- tricity a year. The entire state of Tennessee, exclusive of Oak Ridge, used 11 billion kwh in 1952. Knox City Barber's Rites Set Today KNOX CITY, Nov. 20-Funeral for James Arthur Hallmark, Knox City barber and real estate man who diad Thursday, was to be held Saturday at 3 p.m. in the First Baptist Church here. The Rev. Emil Becker, pastor, was to officiate, assisted by other local ministers. Burial was set for Knox City Cemetery under direc- tion of Warren Funeral Home. Born Nov. 23, 1883, at Lineville, Ala., Mr. Hallmark had lived in Knox City since about 1903. Semi- retired, he had been a barber here since 1908. Mr. Hallmark, who would have been 71 Thanksgiving Day, was a mem'oer of the Baptist Church. Survivors include his wife, the former Maude'Herring of Haskell County; one son, Edwards L. Hall- mark of Houston; five grandchil- dren; three sisters and one broth- Another son, Noel A. (Sam) Hall- mark of Lubbock died last year. ly jumped out: Q. Do you know of any reason why someone else should have taken her life? A. Possibly. Q. Will you state the possibility? A. Well, I don't know but I have heard of individuals who are ma niacal enough that when they star something, and act like that, if becomes a compulsion, a means o: satisfaction er something o that nature. She has spurned lov ers, potential lovers. Courtroom Silent The courtroom suddenly became dead silent as the spectators tried to fathom the detective's hurried reading of the involved passage. He went on without pause: Q. How many of these potential lovers did she have? A. Three that I know of and I am pretty sure more. I am certain that there "were more. Q. Have you told the police about the three and revealed their iden- tity? A. Yes. A moment or two later the thin- haired police veteran finished reading the statement with a clos- ing note by Dr. Sheppard that "hope you will give me the cp- ormation when and "j.f I shall be ble to remember find it." Calls Recess Then Common Pleas Judge Ed ward Blythin called a recess and eporters closed in with requests or a look at the statement. Later, the prosecution said it ha l a.m. Relative numldBJ at a.m. N ftr exit. for M COMMUNIST LEADER Junius Irving Scales, dark suit, identified by FBI as leader of the Communist party in Tennessee and North and South Carolina, was arrest- ed on a Memphis street corner Thursday. Bond was set at paratroop division into position for lossible attack against Nationalist outposts off the coast. The Californian said he does not believe this country can brook any Communist advance into the Paci- fic. Continue Support 'We should continue to give log- istic support for Quemoy and the other he said. "But if it should develop that the Commu- nists are mounting a major effort to move out into the Pacific and seize these outposts for an assault on Formosa, we .must not permit them to fall. "Any movement of the Commu- nists "out into the Pacific would not be to the advantage of our in- terests. Theoretically, of course, the loss of the island of Quemoy and the Tachens would not neces- sarily be a fatal blow to Formosa. "But the psychological advan- tage the Communists would gain all over the world would be tre- mendous." Attack Sore Knowland said ho felt that if the Chinese Communists were aware this country would fight to defend the offshore islands they probably would not attack. _ President Eisenhower and Sec- retary of State Dulles, while mak- ing plain it is administration policy to fight in Formosa's defense if necessary, have not been clear on this point as regards the offshore islands. The matter reportedly has been the subject of some argument within the administration. Knowland said he believes Na- tionalist defenses would make Que- moy "a tough nut for the Comm- nuts to crack."   

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