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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, November 10, 1954 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - November 10, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               EVENING FINAL "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL. LXXIV, ABILENE, TEXAS. WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 10, 1954 -TWENTY-EIGHT PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS PRICE DAILY 5c, SUNDAY Reds' Attitude E asier On Shooting, Ike Says Heavy Fog Follows Rain, Lightning E4SY, Ogle winces as Dr. H. J. Stennis, City-County Health Unit direc- tor takes a sample of his blood in an enco re to the vaccine tests last spring. John- ny was one of 100 second, third, and fourth-graders at Crockett School whose blood will be compared with samples taken last year to test effects of the vaccine. Assisting the doctor is Mrs Maurice Garrett, school nurse. Johnny is the son of Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Ole 1834 Jackson St. He didn't cry, even though the doctor had to jab three times be- fore hitting "paydirt." (Staff photo by Do n Hutcheson.) _____________________ Boy Goes to Jail Over Grid Rivalry A 17-year-old boy was sentenced to 15 days in jail and assessed court costs Wednesday after plead- ing guilty to whipping a 14-year- oid -South Junior High School stu- dent with a rubber hose. J: T. Sparks, Taylor. County Ju- ptticer; laid the- aggravated assault -'Charge filed In Taylor County Court stemmed from foot- ball rivalry between North and High. Schools. .Tiie anm.s! -game is scheduled for Thursday night. The defenddant Mprvin Ellison, 5141 Hardy St.. is a former North J'.m'tr student lie qvit school in the ninth grade he told County Judge Reed Ingalsbe Effison told in court of being in an suto with three other boys. Tin other three, also former North Junior students, left the scene as soon as the fight began off the South Junior grounds near a con-' ccssinn stand earlier this week, El- HEUB said. A teacher, {Sin-man, broke: vy 'he fight. "We have trbible each year be- fore Sparks: said. "Some paint has Weft "thrown on both the North and South junior buddings In other county court action Wednesday, Mrs. Bessie Barnett of Graham pleaded guilty to a charge of check swindling She was as- sessed a fine and costs. The judge ordered bond forfeit- ed when Hoyle Williams of Odessa failed to appear in court to ans- wer a charge of driving while in- toxicated. The jucige ordered legal machinery set in action for Wil- liams' immediate arrest. J. B. Gibbs to City Recreation Post 3 Held n Burglary Three AWOL" soldiers arrested londay night in New Orleans as uspects Li the Rainbow Cafe bur- ary here will be returned to Abi- ne to face charges. City Police Detective Lt.. George Mtton quoted Dist.Atty: Tom odd Wednesday as saying they will'be extradited, if exlraditioa roves Found Asleep New Orleans police arrested the ollowing three suspects, rall'alseep n an automobile in that city: Vebster Walter Willoughby, 26; ouie D. Burson, 20, and Norman argal, 23. A woman with whom they. had traveling gave police the tip eading to their arrests. The trio was picked up in re- ponse to the three-state order hich Abilene police had sent out. utton said. Charges have be en wreck, lightning struck from heavy clouds at San Antonio and killed a high school football play- er, Harry Rexin, 16. Visibility Zero At a.m. Wednesday the Jennings Bryan Gibbs, 33. for- mer Hardin Simmons Univer- sity student and ex coach in Sweetwater public, schools, has been employed as city recreation director for Abilene. He accepted Wednesday morn- ing, but said it may be around Feb. 1 before he begins his new duties. He is now serving his first year as physical education teacher and athletic coach for Odessa elemen- tary shools, Gibbs said he felt be probably should remain oh his present job unta mid term of the school session. This would mean that he would start his work here about The city's Park and Public Re- creation Board voted Tuesday, in its regular meeting to offer Gibbs the position here. It set the salary as per year. Gene Galbraith, board member, was delegated to contact Gibbs and' see whether the latter would accept the offer. Galbraith got in touch with Gibbs Wednesday morning and obtained his accep- tance. Position of full time city re- creation director was discontinued several months ago by the park and recreation board, which in so doing dispensed with the services of Clarence D. Lasseter, the first year around recreation director thSinCcey then, City Park Supt. Scott Fikes has been handling the WHAT'S NEWS ON INSIDE PAGES YOU'RE (PUFF PUFF) THt JURY Cigar may be o but 1955 seen in new olmanac. Pose HOSPITAL I-Dr. Vernon T. Wotlev, super- intend.nt.of Abilene Hos- pital, states his views of proposed 'chanaes. Page 1-B. TEACHERS Texas imd more twetwrt ip ecreation duties along with his upervision of parks. Fikes will ontinue as park superintendent. Brothers are Preachers Gibbs was born at Lake harles. La., June 15, 1921. He is married, and a member the Christian church. His two rothers are Christian church Teachers. He moved with his parents to eaumont, Tex., from Mansfield, From the seventh grade irough high school he attended eaumont schools, graduating lay 24, 1938, from South Park igh School there. In high school 'he played foot- all, basketball and baseball. After his father died July 13, 939, Gibbs began working in a 'holesale drug store to help sup- jort the family. He worked there until July, 1940. From July, 1940, until January, 944, he was employed at the 'ennsylvania Shipyards Inc., in teaumont. He then entered the Navy, and erved until he received an honor- ible discharge March i, 1946. Dur- ing his Navy service he attendee owa State College, Ames, Iowa our months, and also was on an Army transport. Graduated From H-SU Gibbs entered Hardin Simmons Jniversity in September. 1946 where he played one year of foot ball and three years of baseball He graduated at H-SU in 1949 with a Bachelor of Science degree In the fall of 1949 he resume! o. H-SU to work on a Master o Education degree. He completed the M.E. degree in January, 1931 In the 1951-52 term he became athletic coach for Sweetwate public schools. He was coacl there in junior high school tw years and assistant coach in sen ior high school one year. This pas summer he directed the recrea tion program for the City Sweetwater. He joined the Odessa publi schools this fall as elementary school physical education teacher and coach. Moisture laden skies cooled by the night air blanketed the Abilene area Wednesday morning with a "cloud layer on the ground." The fog dropped visibility at Mu- nicipal Airport to one-eighth of a mile. The fog blanket was an after- math of rain up to 1.25 inch Tues- day in the Abilene area. Heaviest rainfall was the 1.25 reported from a hard downpour at Ranger. Hits Transmitter At Eastlanrl, lightning and thun- der accompanied a 1.10 inch fall. The lightning was blamed for knocking a radio station transmit- ter off the air twice. Lightning also struck near Abi- lene. A fuse was blown out at the Texas Highway Department's ra- dio tower, knocking out THP radio operations except on a limited ba- sis for more than four hours. The THP unit went out about 5 p.m. Abileiie's rainfall was at Municipal Airport and .25 at 857 EN 13th St. Latest rain reported was about half an inch at" Stamford and Has- kell and .20 inch at Merkel. The precipitation fell Wednesday morning. The showers fell mostly to the east and south of Abilene. Buffalo Gap had 1.00 inch but only light showers fell in the Lake Abilene vicinity. 1 Trees Hit An electrical disturbance also reported at Cisco during the .60 rain. Lightning hit'two trees The 'rSraks :be- there'said the rain may have damaged some cotton still un-haryested. Hail was heaviest near the B. B. Barry home four miles south of No crop Rain at e lower 60s in southernmost Tex- The Abilene Weather Bureau's 30 a.m. forecast called for the g to dissipate this afternoon un- r cloudy to partly cloudy skies. The fog may return Wednesday ght and Thursday morning but rill not be as heavy as Wednes- ay morning, the weather man .id. The West Coast cool front that ave some promise of bringing in to Texas has about halted Sts asterly movement on a line from Los Angeles, Calif., to Salt Lake ty, Utah and on through western orth Dakota, the weather bureau aid. McCarthy, Solon Cross at Censure WASHINGTON ffl Sen. Wat- ins told Sen. McCarthy today the nly way to get a completely neu- ral person on the censure issue ffoiild be to pick "a deaf, dumb and blind person and a moron." Watkiiis, head of the Special ommittee which recommended ensure of that irust when McCarthy suggested was prejudice on the mittee. Cross Worti The two sraatori quickly slipped nto a dueling eichanga.of words alter the Senate got down to formal lebate on rebuking McCarthy, Wisconsin Republican. Clyde, where .90 felk damage was reported. Clyde was gauged at .05 inch. The fog that covered the Abilene area was also spotted over much of the state. The misty shroud was blamed for the highway deaths of six young people in a crash on the Beaumont Port Arthur highway. STUDENTS TOLD: led here, and warrants issued. The suspects were in the same udson automobile, bearing the ame license number, as the in- irmant had tipped Abilene police hey were traveling in. They had their possession two pistols, as ie informant had said. In their possession also was a irst State Bank, Abilene, money ack. Part of the cash burglar- zed from the Rainbow Cafe was aken in such a sack. All three suspects are reported s AWOL from Fort Lewis, Wash., utton stated. Lost Kainbow Cafe, 200 Butternut t., was burglarized early last Vednesday morning of loot wught to total about Most f it was cash. A meat cleaver >as used to break into a cigaret nachine and a nickelodeon. Detective Button said a woman had been riding with the EUS- lects were left stranded by them n Fort Worth Wednesday or Wed- esday night. She retaliated by going to Fort Worth police and elling them of the burglary, Sut- oh reported. Fort Worth police notified Abi- ene police, who in turn had a adio broadcast put out through- jut Texas, Louisiana and Califor- lia. The woman had thought the ;uspects were from a California military base. Weather Bureau reported fog ,at Childtess, where visibility was zero, and at Midland, San Angelo, Mineral Wells. Wichita Falls, Houston and Beaumont. Dawn temperatures ranged from the lower 40s in the Panhandle to THE WEATHER Dixon-Yales Stall Foiled WASHINGTON Senate- House Atomic Energy Committee today defeated a Democratic at tempt to block immediate signing of the Dixon-Yates contract. The committee acted shortly af ter President Eisenhower said a his news conference he still favorei the controversial proposal. The vote was 10-8 along stric party lines. The 10 Republican on the committee voted to table a resolution by Sen. Pastore (D-RI) Pastore's resolution would hav called on the Atomic Energy Com mission not to sign the contract t feed private power into Tennessee Valley Authority lines. After the vote the committee de cided to resume immediately its public hearings on the contract. WEATHER BtjREAU ABILENE AND VICINITY Partly cloudy to cloudy this afternoon and to- night. Partly cloudy Thursday. High tem- perature this afternoon 65. Low tonight 45- 50. High Thursday NORTH CENTRAL AND WEST TEXAS: Clear to partly cloudy through Thursday. important temperature changes. EAST TEXAS: Partly cloudy and mild through Thursday. Moderate northeasterly winds on the coast. SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS: Partly cloudy and mud through Thursday. Scat- end ttrandenhowers in extreme south this afternoon. Moderate northeasterly winds on the coast. High and low temperatures for 24 honrs ended at a.m.: 72 and 47 degrees. TEMPEIUTUIES Tues. P. M. Wed. A: M. 71............ 50 57 57............'- 57............. 56 55............ 52 52 52 51 51 51 SI 51 53 S4 56- StinriH Mar a.m. Sunset lonltht 9 M Barometer readme at P.O. 9.S2. ItobUn MrnUlty al p.m. Mrs. Carl Muslon Dies After Stroke Mrs. Carl Muston of 1110 Cedar St. died at 6 a.m. Wednesday in a. Dallas hospital after sufferin a stroke. She was admitted to the- hospital three weeks ago. Born in Cooper, she had livei in Abilene since 1918. She was a member of the First Baptisl Church. Survivors are her husband; tw daughters, Peggy Muston and Patt Sue Muston, both of the home three sisters, Mrs. Leo Antiiley i 1633 Sycamore St., Mrs. Harol Rudolph, Lubbock, formerly Abilene, and Mrs. Ralph Antille of Edinburg; and a brother, C E. Hicks, owner of Hicks Food Store, 241 Peach St WHERE IT RAINED ABILENE Municipal Airport 05 857 EN 13th .25 Total for Year Normal 20.61 LAKE ABILENE Shower Anson 35, Breckenridge .28 Buffalo Gap 1.00 Cisco 60 Clyde J OS Coleman 10 Eastland 1.10 Electra 31 Haskell 1-00 Merkel -20 Ranger 1.25 Rising Star -75 Robert Lee 30 Stamford -76 Sweetwater Wingate -20 Winters .....1.00 One ground on which Jhe Wat- kins committee recommendet censure was that McCarthy took a contemptuous attitude toward the subcommittee. McCarthy contended the sub- committee's activities were im prbperand "dishonest." Courthouse to Close Abilene businesses .will remain open for Veterans Day Thursday but the courthouse, banks, som law offices and Abilene Air Force Base, will be closed for toe noli day., Loyalty to U. S. and Reds 'Impossible' It is absolutely impossible to be syal to the United States and Party at the same ime, Herbert Philbrick told an pplauding, overflow student as- anbly Wednesday morning in Abilene High School. The famous FBI counterspy tarted his talk with: 'I did live three lives for nine ong years." He told of joining a Communist- ront organization by accident living as an ordinary civi- ian. He also told of becoming a olunteer FBI counterspy shortly after meeting persons he .suspect- ed to be Communists in 1940. Wouldn't Believe It "If someone had walked up to ie in the spring of 1940 and told ne only a part of what was to iappen to me, I would not have believed he said. The Soviet Union has worked many years on the brain-washing echnique, he said. The technique nvolves transforming an indivi- dual's mind so that he can't tell right from wrong. The agent said brain-washing was "Soviet psychology" conditioned reflex which is obtain- ed when the individual is unable .0 use logic. "The Communist Party is criminal Philbrick said. "Whenever the Communist >arty comes into contact Tfith jeople, there is tragedy, heart- jreak and sorrow. This is true everywhere behind the Iror Curtain and inside the. Soviet Union." Only Wife Knew The agent, who was, the star witness of the United States dur- ing the trial of U top Communists said that not even his own par- ents knew he had joined the Com- munist Party. Only his wife and two FBI agents knew he was an FBI coun lerspy. Not even his wife knew that the first year. His three lives started by acci dent, he said. He and his wife were in Cambridge, Mass. They decided to join organizations to increase their'list of friends. One organization was the Cam bridge Youth Council, outwardly a youth organization, but actually a Red-dominated unit Six months later Philbrick found himsel chairman of the council. At this time, he became an FBI counter Subsequently he joiMd roung Communist League. Many its members consisted of young >eople who were loyal to the nited States, to their families nd to God, he said. When the rain washing began, many lembers withdrew membership ut some did. not. Father Cried The FBI agent toW of meeting father whose son had become Communist. Tears streamei own the father's face during the onversation with Philbrick. Th ather wished his son was deac ather than alive as a traitor lis. country. 'If anyone asks if the Commu nists mean business, you can sa they Philbrick said: "Th Communists hate everything thi country stands for. They are ou 0 destroy every free country. He said the Communists hav wo party lines. One line is tal of peaceful co existence. Th other is taught in secret mee ngs. The Communists-operate wo levels out in the open an underground, he said. 'No Communist would becom president of the present U.S. gov- be said. "That woul happen only if the Soviet Union could dominate this country.' Issues Are Clouded Concerning Attack WASHINGTON President Eisenhower said today that there are cloudy features about the looting down of an American .19 photo plane in the area of northern Japan last Sunday. The President said tie American lane had a right to be where it as, and this country is aggrieved. But he discussed the affair in much softer words than Secretary f State Dulles had used yesterday, he President said that the Soviets ave taken an attitude in the mat- er which seems to be more con- iliatory than in past instances of ttack on U.S. aircraft. Dulles yesterday had accused the Soviet government of "falsehood" claiming the American plane ad violated Russian airspace and n contending the U.S. craft opened re on Soviet fighters. N. 'SHttaK Ducks' Asked at his news conference bout Dulles' report that American fficials are considering orders for ghter protection for aircraft lying close to the Russians, the 'resident said it is his feeling that when planes go into risky areas' hey ought to be craft fitted for that purpose and shouldn't be just sitting ducks. The President gave a measure of support to U.S. Ambassador Charles Bohlen, who has been under fire from some members of Congress for attending an offi- cial dinner in Moscow after word of the plane attack came out. He said he is not going to li this far ,away from Moscow conclude that Bohlen is wrong. He said this country has a C group of foreign officers and tna they" always fry to act with goocf judgment. Dulles, reporting that Bohlen had only a few minutes notice of the .incident before be went to tb party, had described" the ambassa dor's attendance as understandable in a case where be had to make a snap, decision without, time for study and consultation With Wash- ingtoni Not Clear Cat Eisenhower said the latest air attack case, in which one Ameri can airman lost his life, was not clear cut. Asked to explain that, be tail it occurred over a group of islands near the Kuriles, and that Russia claims those islands.' He added that the United States does n6t recognize that claim. HP said he supposes the Russians are going on the theory that possession is nine points of the law. Some of the newsmen could no escape the conclusion that the President, in line with his recen emphasis on peace in the world was deliberately soft-pedaling his comments. He did say that if fighter escorts are necessary in risky areas Where United States authorities know American planes have a right t be, be thinks escorts should used: Earlier at the Pentagon officials had professed puzzlement as why fighters were not with the downed plane. Eisenhower also told his confer ence he still'is for the Dixon-Vates power contract here at home be- cause no better way has been o fered get the needed electri energy. He said there's nothing in the contract that can raise by a tingle here is any politics in this isn't by his choosing, he laid. The President told his news conf- erence, in commenting on critfi, ism of the proposed contract la ongress, that if there is anything wlitical in the situation, someone' making it that way. The President discussed the pow- r proposal in the wake of a Dem-, cratic prediction that it may get a quiet burial" when the Mth ongress convenes in January. Chinese is no at- m of truth, Eisenhower said, ia eports that Generalissimo PRESIDENT, Page S-A. Col. I; cent the costs of power to Tenhe see Valley Authority customers.', J.S. Approves AbileneHeallh Unit Building U. S. Public Health Service in Washington, D. C, has approved be architects' preliminary plans or the local building to muse Abilene Taylor County Health Unit. That word was received Wednes- day morning by city officials in telegrams from U. S. Rep. Omar Burleson and U. S. Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson. t F. C. Olds Co, architect, Is thus authorized to complete final plans. The federal government has agreed to finance half the cost of construction. The Abilene b tt which each expects to finance v The preliminary plans Bad pre- viously been approved by the City Commission, representatives of Taylor Jones County Medical So- ciety, and Texas State Department of Health. Location of the buOdtag will be at the corner of South 19th and Santos Sts. It is to face South 19th St., said Dr Hugh J Stemus, di- rector of Abilene Taylor County- Health Unit. The building will house offices, clinic quarters, laboratory and any other operations of the health unit. It will include an auditorium' for'health education, where food handlers' schools and meetings of the Cancer Society and other health education groups can be held. Dr. Stennis said construction: bids probably will be taken about the first of next year. He estimat- ed that the earliest possible com- pletion time will be next Jury 1. Masonry construction one story high is planned. Tumbler in Critical Condition at Condition of Gordon Kirby, 15, is "unchanged and still his doctor said Wednesday morn- ing. The boy suffered a concussion and a broken neck when be fell to the Bennett gymnasium floor at ACC during tumbling practice Eat-; urday. His legs are paralyzed. .Gordon is the son of Mrs. J. 0. Kirby, Barracks Eight, Abi- lene Christian College. He is t stu- dent in Abilene High School FBI COUNTERSPY Herbert Philbrkk, right, who lived three Ihea for nine yem, talks with Abilene High School students. The students from left, are Steve student fresUot (M WjJgW ttd Ja> Kiltaau.   

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