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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, November 3, 1954 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - November 3, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               gfotlene X EVENING FINAL "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron VOL. LXXIV. NO. 137 Alfred Pw (AP) ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOV. 3, 1954 PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS AT DALLAS THURSDAY PRICE DAItY 5c, SUNDAY IOC City to Offer New Armory Site to Guard Commander City of Abilene will make its formal offer Thursday to the state National Guard Qf a substitute armory site located on the old Municipal Airport. It will also make plans {or the first sale of the new city bonds. Mayor C. E. Gatlin has an ap- pointment in Dallas for a.m. Thursday with Maj. Gen. Carl P. Phinney, commanding general of the Division, Texas National Guard. The conference will take place at Gen. Phinney's Dallas office. Gatlin will seek to get Gen. Phinney's approval of the new ar- mory site, and eventually that of the whole State Armory Board. The city has offered a free lease on the old airport land in lieu cf the location formerly leased in Warm Gulf Air Kayos Freeze. Triggers Rain A warm blanket of moist Gulf air delivered a knock out punch to the freezing weather that had been predicted tor Abilene anc area Tuesday night. The Gulf air, riding in over the cold front, set off scattered light rain about a.m. x At a.m. .51 had Ranger, 68 miles to the east of Abi lent. At that time it was stit sprinkling and skies were heavily overcast. The moist air blanket kept the low temperature here Tuesdaj night and early Wednesday morn tag at 41. The high Tuesday wai 46. By noon Wednesday rainfal here had amounted to .06 at Muni cipal Airport. Stamford had go! ten .12 by about 9 a.m. and show ers were continuing. A trace wa reported at Rotan. Heaviest rainfall was at Rising Star and Merkel. The downfal began at Rising Star about 8 a.m and by 10 a.m. had been measur ed at .30. Rain was still fallini gently at 10 a.m. and looked as i it would continue. At a.m., Merkel had .re- ceived .30 inch and it was stil "raining hard." The forecaster said at noon Wed nesday skies to the west of An: lene were clearing. Rain this afl ernoon, if any, would be very light he said. Thursday's weather bureau pre diction was for decreasing cloudi ness and warmer temperatures. El Paso Man Wins Special Election For Stale Senator By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Frank Owen in of El Paso wo election to the state Senate froi far West Texas' 29th District latest results' received Wednesday Owen was a state representativ from El Paso. The final unofficial tabulatio showed Owen with Fre Wemple of Midland an Woodrow Bean of El Paso The total vote was wit less than 50 still uncounted. he municipal Fair Park. No action has been taken by ocal Guard officials to accept or eject the offer, but the local epresentatives referred the city t state guard officials. Three Abilene city officials will old a conference in Dallas Thurs- ay regarding the first sale of he recently authorized J6.65 mil- on in bonds. Confer With Attorneys City Manager Austin P. Han- ock. City Commissioner Jack linter and Mayor Gatlin will hold he bond huddle with McCall, 'arkhurst i Crowe, Dallas at- orneys who are handling legal as- ects of the sale. In the meeting Iso will be First Southwest Co., ond firm, representatives. First Southwest Co. is handling for the city the exchange of the outstanding revenue bonds for new refunding bonds. That exchange must be made before any of the new water and sewer revenue bonds can legally be sold. Date for the first sale, amount to be offered, schedule of maturi- ties and other details will be work- ed out at the meeting. Mayor Gat- lin said. Voters this summer authorized the issuance of 55 million in wa- ter and sewer revenue bonds and million in tax bonds. The revenue issues will finance water and sewer projects. The tax bonds are to pay for fire stations, street improvements, and park develop- ment. Democrats Hold Lead To Win U. S. House NOBODY'S TALKING, .WORKING AT AIR BASE; JUST RAINING A dispute was reported to have broken out at Abi- lene Air Force Base Tuesday between carpenters and workers over whose job it is to install aluminum windows in airmen's dormitories. But Wednesday morning nobody concerned was say- ing a word for publication. The business representative of the carpenters' union local said, "I have nothing to say." W. M. Edwards, superintendent at the base for R. E. McKee General Contractor Inc., El Paso, declined to comment. Asked who was working Wednesday morn- ing, he said, "Nobody; it's raining out here." The newspaper was unable to locate any spokesman for the iron workers. HIS'HOMETOWN' Ayoca Dedicates Scout Hall to Harley Sadler AVOCA, Nov. 3. Avocans are dedicating Boy -Scout hall to the late Sen. Harley Sadler. Sen Sadler was stricken with a fatal :rfeartysmack Oct. II while acting as master of ceremonies for a scout benefit show at Avbca, his 'hometown." He died at Stamford two days later. The decision to name the edifice the "Harley Sadler Memorial Scout Hall" was made after it was THE WEATHER TJ.S. DEPABTJIENT OF'COMMERCE WEATHER ABILENE AND VICINITY Mostly cloudy and cool. Partly cloudy tcaifiht and Thursday. High temperature today 60- Low tonight High Thursday in the 60s. NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS: Occasions! rain this afternoon and tonight. Thursday, clearing and a little warmer. WEST TEXAS: Cloudy to partly this afternoon and tonight with some light rain mostly in the South Plains, and east of Pecos Valley. Warmer this afternoon. Thursday, partly cloudy and turning a little cooler. EAST TEXAS: Occasional rain late this "afternoon and tonight. Thursday, partly cloudy with scattered thundershowers. Warmer tonight and Thursday. Fresh to locally strong easterly winds on the coast. SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS: Occasional rain this afternoon ana tonight. Thursday, partly cloudy and warmer. Scattered showers near the coast. Most fresh east- erly winds on the coast. High and low temperatures for 24 hours ending at a.m.: 46 and n degrees. Tnes. P.M 43 TEMPERA-TUBES Wed. A.M. 45 4-30 45 45 45 41 45 43 45 Sunrise today" a.m. Sunset tonight "Barometer reading at p.m. 28.22. Relative humidity at p.m. Tare. suggested by many Avocans am residents of other towns, according to Mrs. R: J. Taylor, the late Sen ator's niece. She is also publicit chairman of the Scout (ponton the Avoca P-TA. Mrs. Taylor said .the building has been purchased and three lots donated. The building is to -be moved from Stamford to Avoca; The Scouts, their dads, wit the help of others will convert th building into "something that fu ture generations may be proud Mrs. Taylor said. It is to be finished in sawed stone. Beautiflcation of thi grounds will be a project for the Scouts during the coming year. A Girl Scout troop is being or- ganized at Avoca and will use the building, as will an active Cub pack led by Mrs. Charlene Baker and Mrs. B. H. Fillmon. James Baker is cubmaster. Mrs. Taylor expressed apprecia- tion from Avocans for the late Sen. Sadler and workers and entertain- ers at the benefit show at which the Senator was stricken. Burglar Hacks Out Loot With Meal Cleaver Loot believed to total around 100 was taken from Rainbow ,afe, 2700 'Butternut St., Tuesday ight by a burglar who wielded of the restaurant's meat leavers to break open a cigaret machine and a nickelodeon. Taken from the cigaret machine an estimated in cash and cigarefcs (mostly said City Police Detective Lt George sutton. An undetermined amount of :ash ras taken from the money box of he nickelodeon. This is expected o total from to Sutton ;aid. Elsewhere in the cafe in dimes and in pennies were stolen. Door Removed To get into the building the burg- ar removed the pins from the linges of a rear door and took t. whole door down. Sutton said the cigaret machine apparently is ruined as the result af the blows the burglar struck it with the cleaver. The burglar also used the cleav- er to open the nickelodeon. Oace inside the nickelodeon, the burglar found the key to the money box nd used the key .to open the .box. was left "by the burglar near the cash register. No fingerprints were found, lead- ing Sutton to believe that the burg- lar.wore gloves. Police think the burglary hap- pened between and a.m. Wednesday. A GOOD Former Vice President Alben W. Barkley, candidate for U. S: Senator from Kentuclcy, peeps through the door at a rural polling place at Pa- ducah, Ky., his home town, to see how many voters were ahead of him. As Kentucky Senator WHAT'S NEWS ON INSIDE PAGES CORPORATE tous gill today doesn't ambi- marry merely a man. Page 8-A. MISSING you one of the 12 persons listed today who may be eligible for up to from old securities? Cage 1-B. DEMO NEW election breaks Dewey reign. Page 2-B. Demos Knock Republicans Out of 7 WASHINGTON If) Following s a list of Senators either elected o Congress or leading in their res- sective states as of 11 a.m. today. X indicates incumbent; 1 indicates eading and not yet John J. Sparkman CD- Arkansas: John L. McClellan (D- California: Thomas W. Kuchel Colorado: Cordon Allott (R-) Delaware: J. Allen Frear Georgia: Richard B. Russell (D- Illinois: Paul H. Douglas Idaho: Henry C. Dvorshak Iowa: Thomas E. Martin (R) Kansas: Andrew F. Schoeppel Kentucky: Alben W. Barkley (D) Louisiana: Allen J. Ellender (D- Maine: Margaret Chase Smith R-x) (elected Sept. Massachusetts: Leverett Salton- stall Michigan: Patrick V. McNamara lorships Br RUSSELL BRINES WASHINGTON W Democrats grabbed the fat political prize of New York's governorship and turn- ed the Republicans out of at least six other statehouses across the nation yesterday. With three races still not settled, the Democrats had clinched 18 governorships, with the Republi- 'cans winning 13 out of 34. Eight Democrats and six Republican governors were holdovers. The GOP won in Massachusetts in a close race not decided until midmorning. Republicans led in Nevada and Wyoming. Democ-ats appeared sure of winning in Minnesota. Averell Harriman, multimillion- aire financier and former Demo- cratic ambassador, broke the 12- year GOP rule ot New York with a paper-thin victory over Sen. Irving M. Ives. Harriman won a bareknuckle campaign by about an plurality in a total vote of more than five million. Ives had been picked to Gov. Thomas E Dewey as the GOP standard bearer when Dewey decided to re- tire after completing his third con ecutive term. In New York's closest campaign of modern times. Ives conceded defeat when Harriman held a 000-vote lead, and after that the margin dwindled sharply. As one result, a hot fight appears nevitable in 1956 for New York's 45 presidential electoral votes he nation's largest single bloc. Harriman sought the Democratic nomination in 1952, but said he'll back Adlai E. Stevenson two years ;nce. Republican Gov. Goodwin K. Knight won an easy victory in California which has the second largest bloc of electoral Knight, whose Democratic rival was Richard P. Graves, was making his first bid at the polls for the governor's chair, vacated last year by Chief Justice Earl Warren. Democrat George M. Leader up- set Republican control in powerful Pennsylvania by a ad- vantage over Republican Lloyd. H Wood. It was the first Democratic win there in 20 years. The Democrats took over Arizona, Colorado, Connecticut, New Mexico and Maine. The Maine elections were held Sept. 13. Former Rep. Abraham A. Ribi- coff turned out GOP Gov. John D. Lodge by fewer than rotes in Connecticut. Ernest W. iIcFarland, former Democratic senate leader, defeated GOP Gov. toward Pyle in Arizona. Democratic Gov. Frank J Lausche, Ohio's master vote get- ter, won an unprecedented fifth lerm. In Michigan, Democratic Gov. G. Mennen Williams was given the first fourth term in the state's history. In both states, the terms are two years. The Republicans went into the campaijin with a 29-19 advantage in governorships. Nowi the mini mum total of 26 governorships gives the Democrats the state- house for the first time since 1950. The Democrats also won Ala bama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee and Texas. The GOP won in Idaho, Iowa Kansas, Maryland, Nebraska, New Rampahire, North Dakota, Oregon South Dakota, Vermont, Wiscon- sin. ELECTION IN BRIEF LOUISVILLE, Ky. (JV-Kentuck- ians have picked 76-year-old Alben W. Barkley, the former vice presi- dent, to represent them for six more years in the U. S. Senate. The Democratic senator-elect al- ready has served 47 years as their public servant, 22 of them in the Senate. He left the Senate in 1949 to become the "Veep." Voters of this traditionally Dem- ocratic commonwealth chose Bark- ley over Republican Sen. John Sherman Cooper, 53. They also elected five Demo- crats and one Republican to the U.S. House of Representatives. In two other contests, to fill out the state's new delegation of eight con- gressmen, a Democrat was lead' ing in one and a Republican in the other. That lineup is identical to the lineup in the present delegation: six Democrats and two Republi- cans. Barkley continued to stretch his lead. With 78 per cent of returns tabulated, he held an unofficial margin of Tabulation of re- turns from of precincts gave Barkley and Cooper Cooper, the first Republican elected to the -Senate from Ken- tucky since 1924, refused to con- cede. But he was given no chance to overtake the fast-stepping Barkley. Minnesota: Hubert Humphrey Dallas Republican Is Representative Mississippi: James 0. Eastland Montana: James E. Murray e attributed to Eisenhower's own ast minute campaigning and the vigorous drive made by Nixon. In a give-and-take, Democrats away Republican seats In Kentucky, Michigan, Nevada and Wyoming, while the Republicans retaliated by grabbing Democrat- c seats in Ohio, Colorado and Iowa. Meek Defeated Eisenhower's blessing for Re- publican Joseph T. Meek did not irevent Meek's defeat by Demo- :ratic Sen. Paul H. Douglas in Illinois. Neither did a presidential endorsemer' keep Republican Rep. Herbert B. Warburton from being >eaten by Democratic Sen. Allen Frear Jr. in Delaware. And Democratic Gov. G. Mennen Williams, who criticized the Ei- senhower administration for not acting to meet what he said was widespread unemployment, won an unprecedented fourth term in Michigan. But Republican Clifford P. Case, most-often endorsed candidate among the President's favorites, was making it an unexpected horse race against Democratic Rep. Charles R. Howell in the New Jer- sey Senate contest Some Repub- licans had attacked Case .'or being too "liberal." Republican Lt. Gov. Gordon Al lott, who bore Eisenhower's bless ing, upset the pollsters by defeat ing Democratic Former Rep. John A. Carroll in the Colorado Senate race. And Republican Rep Thomas E. Martin, an all-out sup- porter of the President's flexible farm price support program, oust ed veteran Democratic Sen. Gu; M. Gillette in agricultural Iowa. Alan Bible made it No. 2 in Senate gains for the Democrats defeating Republican Sen. Ernes S. Brown, who had been appointei after the death of Democratic Sen Pat McCarran. In Connecticut, Democratic Rep Abraham A. Ribicoff took the measure of Republican Gov. John D. Lodge by about 7.000 votes Pennsylvania completed the swing down the Atlantic coast Jtarted by S. Huskie as Maine's governor h September. Win For In Pennsylvania, Democrat leorge M. Leader triumphed over Republican Lloyd H. Wood. In Maryland, however. Republican Theodore R. McKeldin broke .he Democratic trend by winning e-election over Harry C. Byrd. It vas the first time the free state las given a Republican two terms. Democratic Sen. Edwin C. John- on made the successful transition lack to the governorship in Colo- ado, Eisenhower's vacation state, and Democrat John F. Simms Jr. won in New Mexico. An old Senate Democratic col- eague, Ernest W. McFarland. made a successful comeback in rizona, pusting Republican Gov. Howard Pyle. Gefi Fifth Term Democratic Gov. Frank J. Lain- Che of Ohio won a fifth term. The gubernatorial results, at ome Senate and House races, eemed to indicate that Eisen- lower's "peace and prosperity" tieme of the closing days of the campaign failed to offset entirely ha reaction to the "pocketbook nerve" touched by unemployment n industrial centers. Approval lead Growing for Amendments By THE ASSOCIATED, PRESS Ail of the 11 proposed amend- ments to the state cluding jury service for lad sizeable leads in counting of Tuesday's general election in Tex- as. Jury service for women and our-year terms for elective'dis- trict and county offices had nar- rower margins than the others. The amendments and their res- lective vote at the last report from he Texas Election Bureau itacfeed up like this: 1. Boost the ceiling on ttate spending for public welfare from the present 35 million dollars to 42 million, approval against 2. Allow transfer of prior service credits in the state employes' and .eachers' retirement funds, ap- proval against 3. Allow certain city employees o qualify for Social Security bene- :iU, approval against 934. 4. Allow use of the surplus mon- ey in the Confederate Pension Funo. or constructing a new state office milding in Austin, approval 098; against 5. Raise the pay of legislators o per day for 120 days 'front ilO a day now, approval against 6. Prohibit pledging the state's credit to support toll roads, ap- proval against 7. Require women to serve on juries, approval against 8. Allow four-year terms for pre- cinct, county and district elective offices who now- have two-year terms, approval 118.334. 9. Allow joint city-county hospital operations in Harris, Dallas, Bex- ar, Tarrant, Galveston, El Paso, or Jefferson Counties, approval1' -against 10. Allow military personnel from, Texas to vote if they had lished residence in Texas a before entering service, approval against 11. Allow counties of pop- ulation or less to vote on whether. they want a tax approval against DOES WATER AND OIL MIX? Is the city dog man also a cat man? Police received a telephone call Tuesday from a woman who said she had some cats in a box and wanted the dog catcher to put them in tbe city pound. Tbe matter was referred to the dog entvber.   

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