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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: September 28, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 28, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               MILD EVENING "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL.LXXIV.NO.103 Auociatfd Prent (Af) ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY EVENING, SEPT. PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS PRICE DAILY! Prison Terms, Fines Levied In U.S. Court William Ira Tucker, charged with receiving and concealing a stolen automobile that was trans- ported in interstate commerce, en- tered a pilea of nolo contendere (no contest) to the charge Tuesday morning in U. S. District Court. Judge T. Whitfield Davidson a 6 month prison term but suspended the sentence and placed Tucker on probation for two years. Judge Davidson cleared three criminal cases from the U.S. Court docket Monday by setting fines totaling for one man and as- sessing prison sentences for two. One of the prison terms also was probated. Assistant U. S. Dist. Atty. Hiram Childress. who presented the cri- minal cases, also asked Judge Davidson to enter default judg- ments in favor of the government in four civil suits. A. A. O'Connor of Odessa drew in fines on 10 counts in a charge that he was operating a trucking line without a certificate of public convenience from the In- terstate Commerce Commission. O'Connor does business in Odessa under the name of O'Connor Broth- ers Trucking Co. Manuel Herrera of Rt. 1, Lor- aine received a 13 month pri- son term which Judge Davidson probated for one year. The court also assessed Herrera a 550 fine. The man was charged with il- legally transporting aliens in this country. Burnice Joe Birdo. Fort Worth Negro, was sentenced to two years in prison on a charge that he forg.- ed an endorsement to a U. S. pos- tal money order. All three men pleaded guilty to the charges against them. Defendants in the civil suits and judgments entered against them were: Lee A. Phillips of Eastland Coun- ty, judgment for overpayment of civil service retirement and dis- ability payments. Harold L. Daniels of Jones Coun- ty, S747.54 judgment for erroneous payment of voluntary allotment made to defendant's mother. Ofc.J8, Burleson of Nolan County, judgment on a promis- sory note to Reconstruction Fi- nance Corporation. Douglass and Bessie Lee Eaton of Rotan. judgment on an FHA loan. NO PREDICTIONS FIRE THE gather to s ee some of the 65 whales that lost their way after being led by two pilot whales into the Firth of Vejle in Denmark last week. They were stranded on beaches and were killed by local fishermen: It had been 50 years since a herd of the mammals was spotted in the f irth. 99-Year Term Given Gaither ANSON, Sept. Jurors hi the 104th District Court here found Willard F. (Bill) Gaither guilty of murder with malice in a verdict returned late Monday night. They recommended that Gaither, charged in the death of Abilene Policeman Jimmy Spann. be sen- tenced to 99 years in prison. An overflow crowd jammed into the courtroom shortly before mid- night Monday to hear the verdict. The room seats about 160, but it was estimated that 275 spectators were present Jury ForemanCHaskell Bartjett gave the -paper to 1 Judge Owen Thomas at p.m. Dis- trict Clerk; Leon Thurman read the verdict at pirn. The jury found that Gaither was not insane at the time that Spann was fatally wounded in a gun bat- tle June 17. A suspended sentence was not recommended. Among the jury's findings was the ruling that Gaither had not been convicted of a felony in this or any other state. A-War to Take More Men, Ridgway Says DENVER Matthew B. Ridgway said after a conference with President Eisenhower today there is "a very definite possibil- ity" an atomic war would require more combat strength, rather than less. The Army chief of staff told a news conference "the stakes in the next world war are not something you can play with." Ridgway and Secretary o'. the Army Stevens came to the Presi- dent's vacation headquarters to make what Stevens called a rou- tine'report on Army matters. The secretary said that, among other things, they told Eisenhower that progress is being made with respect to the Army's "continuing effort to maximize its combat strength." Increase ill Men Ridgway was asked, in that con- nection, whether an atomic war would require more American com- bat strength, or less. "We see a very definite possi- bility that a war in which atomic weapons are freely used may re- sult in increased manpower, rather than Ridgway replied. He added that in an atomic con- flict, the United well as any enemy "face elmination of entire units." For that reason, he added, "you've got to be able to replace an entire unit." The potential situation means, Ridgway went on, "that we are not going to be able to build up huge concentrations" of manpow- er and supplies against sn enemy with atomic weapons. Survival Hi Stake It was at that point he dcclarec 1'iat "the stakes in the next world war are survival." He added: "The whole survival of our peo- ple as an independent nation may to at stake." In reply to questions about thi program for increasing comba strength, Ridgway said the United States now has 25 divisions, eluding which are training. In response to another question both Stevens and Uidgway said reporter's statement that this conn try might be planning to withdraw some of Its combat strength Iron Europe was news to them. Both men declined to whether they feel defense of CM ncse Nationalist Quemoy, off the Red China mainland, Is esjjntla to defense of Nationalist Formosa Another culler on the Pmldent kit today wan Dr. Arthur F. Burn hairman of his Council of conomic Advisers in Washington, urns customarily reports to Ei- enhower every Monday morning, ut they have not met in more ian five weeks. There were reports here, mean- hile, that the President plans to et away this weekend for another our or five-day stay at a Rocky fountain trout fishing camp he as visited twice since his vaca- on began. THE WEATHER O.5. OEPAKU1EST OF COMJIEmOK WEATIEB BI'REAIJ ABtLENE AND VTCIKITY ParUjr with incrcutnc iwittortr wiads. ixntiire urf in tow Tuniliy nlett TO. NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS P Joudy and mild with widely scattered through Wednesday. WEST Partly cloudy, widely cattercd TEMPERATURES Ion. P. M. Tues. A. M SS J5 91 75 S9 13 89 88 70 ES SI 73 80 7S 78 81 77 ____ 85 77 59 76 51 Barometer reading p.m. 27.HS. Relative humidity al p.m. Maximum temperature [or 24 hoars ed at a.m.: S3. Minimum temperature tor 24 hours end cd a.m.: 69. Gaither showed no emotion while istening to the verdict. Tears were treaming down the faces of both lis sisters, but neither they nor le made any sound. Notice of appeal was immediate- y given by Defense Attorney Pet- er Briola, who announced that he will prepare the motion for a new rial. He did not say when it will >e presented. Prosecution and defense rested heir cases Monday at p.m. after j morning of testimony in the packed courtroom. Court was recessed during the afternoon for Judge Thomas to pre- iare his charge to the jury. Clos- ng arguments started at p.m. Special Prosecutor Esco. Walter asked for the death penalty closing the state's Briola, making his argument for the defense, charged that (Jaither dould not have been sane at the ime of the shooting because he returned three guns with shells them to police officers just beforehand. That was as Gaither was leaving Jie W. E. Martin home in Abilene where he had disarmed three of ficers as they entered the house rtie-wild auto chase that ended with Spaaa's fatal shooting follow- ed immediately. Brieia Scolded In 'a dramatic dosing, Briola said that Mrs. Martin, sister ol Gaither's wife, lied when she saic she did not receive any money from the Gaithers. When Briola repeated that was a "black Judge Thomas warned the defense attorney tha no such action was allowed in his court. Judge Thomas charged the jurj to take Gaither's condition of mint into consideration. If Gaither was incapable of calm reflection at thi time of the shooting because o the" condition of his mind, hi should not .be sent to prison fo more than five years if found guil ty, Judge Thomas said. He told them that if Gaither i not guilty by reason of insanit; they must say so in their decision If he is guiltv and he is of san mind, then the penalty shall be life imprisonment or death. He told the jury it could fim Gaither guilty of murder wit malice aforethought, guilty of min- der without malice aforethoughl guilty but of unsound mind, no guilty by reason of insanity or no guilty. [old Front :rom Rockies )ue Tonight By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A cold air mass falling out of he Rocky Mountains could bring weather and rain to Texas ly Wednesday, weather observers said Tuesday. But the Weather Bureau Bids Awarded TEMPLE for construe tion of worth of flood con trol structures on the Trinity Rive were awarded yesterday at th State Soil Conservation Headqua ters. was cautious with its predictions. "The cold air could swing east- vard and miss was the opinion of a forecaster. Falling temperatures, increasing winds and rain was the prospect meanwhile, if the cold air mass reached the state. Early Tuesday, the only rain reported was at Amarillo where a thundershower had been playin) since midnight. Cloudiness tha .ranged along the coast and .as far north as Dallas appeared to be dispersing shortly before daybreak Dawn teTipeiRtures ranged from 78 at Corpus Christi to 56 at Dal hart, high in the Panhandle. Maxi mum temperatures Mondav rang ed from 81 at Dalhart 10 99 a Presidio, hardly winter weather Cooler weather seemed the pros pect for most of the Southwest fo Wednesday. Scattered showers and thunder showers -were expected in Texas Louisiana and New Mexico. Snow in the mountains and northeastern sections of Colorado was looke for, and colder weather, accom panied by strong shifting winds was the outlook in Oklahoma. Labor Party OKs German Arming Europe Meet Off Start1 LONDON W The nine-power onference on German rearma- ment got off to what delegates emied "a good start" at a 90- minute session this morning. It started very well but it is oo early yet to predict any re- Belgian Foreign Minister Jaul-Henri Spaak told newsmen as he nine foreign heir aides left the music room ol tstely Lancaster House for the uncheon recess. Echoing Spaak, Canadian For- eign Secretary Lester Pearson said he talks "are off to a very good tart." A last minute move by the French apparently dashed any tope for a comparatively smooth resolution of rival plans to bring Vest German troops quickly into he defense pattern of' Western Surope. With Britain's Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden serving as host and chairman, the foreign ministers ol the United States, Canada, West Germany, France, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg met in the music room of stately Lancaster House, next door to Buckingham Palace. To speed the talks, Eden pro- posed last night that separate am simultaneous. discussions be hell the companion questions o West German and re- armament during the secret ses- ons. Sets Nwember Eden suggested .tie occupying powers France, Britain and tot United States draw up a plai for returning sovereignty to the Bonn republic. The full nine-coun- try conference, meanwhile, would deal with rearmament. Eden set mid-November with in 50 days as a target forlorn plete and final agreement, 'excep for the necessary parliamentary ratifications. The current conference is ex pected tojast fsar to 10 days. British foreign secretary propose! that ft try to-reach'only general agreement, arid that .experts then be instructed to work out details for approval by a second niae-pow er parley to be held within a oath. _ Following this second meeting, le nine ministers would report intly to a special meeting of the ATO.council to be held cot later mid-November. The council ould then admit the West Ger- an republic as the 15th member the North Atlantic Alliance. Smar Btock The stumbling block raised- by French involved the disputed .aar. territory, formerly German ut now tied economically to ranee. The French let it be known yes- erday that they prefer to see the aar administered by the expand- Brussels Treaty organization they and the British have proposed Britain, France, West Germany, taly, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg. The French want agreement on this point before ley approve West German rear lament FUTURE TREND HERE? Delaware School Dispute Reaches Crossroads Today MTLFORD, Del. ffi-The deepen- ing dispute over integration of 11 Negro pupils in MUford's previous- ly all-white high school reached another crossroad today with seg- regationists appealing again for white pupils to remain away from classes. Attendance at today's session un- der the watchful eye of state and local police, could well set a trend for future action in the battle over continuing the U Negro pupils in the 10th grade of the Lakeview Ave. School. Yesterday, less than 30 per cent of the enrollment of pupils appeared for classes. Ten of the 11 Negroes arrived, went to classes and then were driven home with police escort. School officials explained the low attendance by pointing to parents' fear of possible violence or opposi- tion to integration. Just which is predominant apparently will be de- Jap Qivers Begin Removing Bodies From Sunken Ferry HAKODATE." tfl-Japa- nese divers today began removing ,he first of hundreds of bodies In :hc sunken hull of the ferry Tpya Maru which capsized Sunday hi a .yphoon with the loss of 1.172 lives. Three divers recovered the bo- dies of 20 Japanese from the wreckage on the floor of Hakodate harbor. They located the bodies of about 40 of the SO Americans who perished, National rural police estimated the overall typ'.won toll at moei of whom tied hi Mrth- ern Japan. i Divert reported 41 rail cart tore loose from ttwlr nworftgs on boftU' deck when K capsiied, cruihlni hulkheadi, equipment and human beings in Japan's worst maritime disaster. Only 352 bodies have been re- covered. The Japan National Rail- ways listed. 1T5 survivors out ot passengers and crqw, Tire tides, still were washing In bodies. As chill drizzle soaked the scene, a U.S. Air Force helicopter dipped low over the wreckage and dropped while f.owers into the oily, debris-strewn bay In a solute to the fcad.; Hundreds mere died'in wide- spread m a r i e accidents, illdes and other mishaps from typhoon, which veered across northern Japan wllh; winds of 100 milea M knur. Four other la_i- tTie also went down with the loss oi more than 200 lives. The Americans who died on the Toya Maru were mainly service- men most from the 99th Field Artillery Battalion and their de- pendents. Several missionaries also were aboard, including oni who survived. The ferry had anchored in thi harbor when sudden strong gus of wind and mountainous wave flipped it over 190 yards from shore. Second mate highest ranking su-viving of the Toyn Maru, said the captain anc Jr otficcrs "underestimated the which reached 110 mUe M hour ouUkfe harbor. cided this' the' officials elt. Meanwhile, in Marion County West Virginia, the County Board ol Education announced last nigh that it would "seek relief in the ourts" against persons protesting integration in the small coal min- jig community. The Annibelle elementary schoo opened Sept 7 with 13 Negroes Mending classes with 157 whit Indents. County Board Superin endent J. J. Straight said the number of white students subse- luently attending classes dwindled o about half that number. And yesterday, about 16 peopl earned the principal and teachers >f. the elementary 'school there would be "trouble" if they enteret the school. Principal Lloyd H. Se- ;urro and the five teachers wen home and the school was closed. Last night, pro segregation orces in the Milford School Di jict, at their third meeting hree days, stepped up their drum fire for a boycott of the school a a mass meeting in nearby Lincoln State police said a coaservati' estimate -rf the crowd was 750. The Rev. Manaen Warringtot newly elected president of the Delaware Chapter of The Nation Assn. for the Advancement of Whi People, urged the parents to keef their children home in opposition to integration "until the Negroes get out of our schools." He said antl-integrationiste would continue their attack "no matter if it means bloodshed no mat- ter what the consequences." Bryant Bowles, national presi- dent'of the NAAWP, in the crowd from towns near Mil- ford, J a southeastern Delaware community of 5.TW, to "hold a lympathy strike to show thete T.-Boberts, Baltimore attorney whose daugh- ter Judith 6, was.slainJn Miami July 7, has said that Doro-- thy iawrence, above, Baltimore waitress, was his companion on a Miami night dub tour the night of the slaying. ACCUSED KILLER FREED Roberts, right, is followed by his wife as he leaves police headquarters in Towson, Md., with Deputy Sheriff William McCrory. Roberts was freed on bond in the slaying of fiis daughter. Approval Comes on Tiny Margin SCARBOROUGH, England U) Britain's Labor party today ap- proved Clement Attlee's can for German by the tiny margin of only Totes out of cast at the annual party conference here. The vote backing continued ef- forts, to enlist West German troops in western defense was The delegates by a similar slim majority then defeated a motion backed by leftwing Laborite leader Aneurin Bevan calling for an abso- lute ban on German rearmament. The vote on this resolution was In the debate before the vote, the 71-year-old former prime minister had staked his prestige as party leader on a declaration that oppo- sition to West German rearmament would be a "sterfle and negative" course. The Trade Unions' Congress at Brighton two ;weeks ago aporoved continued efforts toward German rearmament by the narrow margin of On most is- sues the party moderates can count on overwhelming support from the unions. .The German arms'issue was the chief point of controversy at the conference, which .opened' yester- day and continues through Friday. Attlee's party chieftainship was not at stake, since' that position is filled by the Labor delegation in Parliament But, ta; bad defeat would shake bis JioM.on the or- ganization and probably would lead ultimately to ia-_ change in leader- ship. It was on the basis Attlee's prestige that the -last minute ap- peals were made during the night to the uncertain union delegations. As a member of the party execu- tive.committee, Bevan was barred from the debate on Germany-by a committee resolution recommend- ing continued support of Attlee's policy. The leftwinger left the floor fight against the moderates to his followers. The fiery Welshman probably will not be on the executive much longer. He gave up a sure seat; in the group to run against Hugh Gaitskell for party treasurer. The job it a post on the executive, but Gaitskell a for- mer chancellor of the 'defeated Bevan. Long rebellious, Bevan gave ev- ery evidence of being pleased at the prospect of severing one more tie with the party'sofficial leader- ship. Apparently he 'prefers .to make his fight to supplant. Attlee as one of the rank and'file. Psychiatrist Polish Security Deserts Hits Balchelor Defense Line SAN ANTONIO W-rA prosecu- tion witness testified today in the court-martial of Cpl. Claude Batch- elor that he does not' believe it is possible to cause a person to become mentally ill by inducing a psychosis. Maj. Henry .Segal of Washington interviewed Batchelor 'in Tokyo. The Kermit, Tex., soldier is charged with collaborating with the enemy while a prisoner of the Communists in Korea. "Psychiatric techniques are used by the Communists to alter a man's fundamental attitudes, be- liefs and even behavior, but: this is not to say they induce a psy- the officer testified.. Host ol the morning session was taken up by verbal sparring ivyeen Batchelor's attorneys and the witness in an attempt to in- duce him te testify that Batchelor was unable to distinguish right from wrong. narenU wtfrt behind them." after a one-week shutdown, went off with- out undue tockknt. The identity tht ehwenth boy. tUH today. WASHINGTON A security official of ..Poland's Communist government has "fled bis country and been granted .asylum in the United States.. This was disclosed today by Atty. Gen. who announced that, at the request of the State Depart- ment, he has granted temporary Pat McCormick Due Home Trip Thursday BIG SPRING "of Patricia figbter injured in the Chidad Acuna, Mexico, bullring Sept. 5, expect to bring her home Thurs- day. -J- Pat, 24. has been in a hospital st Del Rio, across from Ciudad Acuna. since she was gored by a big black Mexican bull. :re- ceived pelvic A Her father, McCormick; petroleum engineer, said to entry into the United States of Josef Swiatlo, Swiatlo ;s former "deputy cfiief of department 1Q of the Polish Min- istry of Public Security in Warsaw. The Justice Department said that No. 10 is responsible for the pro- tection of the Polish Communist party and regime against internal political subversives. Brownell's announcement said Swiatlo took refuge in the Ameri- can sector of Berlin 10 months ago. The only previous hints that the Polish official might have defected to the West came in radio broad- casts from behind the Iron Curtain which made vague references to S-.viaUo's disappearance from War- Batchelor was one of two Amer- daughter's rewrery haj been little {can Gt's who first refused short of remarkable. She, now triation but later changed their minds and sought United Nation sanctuary. About a score of the U.S. ttMltn who first decided'U stay with the Reds are tUH be- hind the Bamboo CutUm. Segal WM 
                            

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