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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: September 12, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 12, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               FAIR; WARM M SUNDAY SXIV.N0.88 Asiociated Preu (AP) "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Cohn Aids McCarthy WASHINGTON, Sept. 11 W-Roy M. ,Cohu came to the defense of his former boss, Sen. McCarthy today as McCarthy fin- ished testifying in his own behalf at Senate committee hearings on charges of censurable conduct. The 27-year-old Cohn, foimer chief counsel to McCarthy's Inves- tigations subcommittee, firmly backed tha Wisconsin senator's stand that a controversial 211 page "FBI letter" was not a classified or secret document when it came into McCarthy's possession in 1953. Violation Charged One of the main censure charges against McCarthy is that he was a party to a violation of the law when, by his own account, he ac- cepted the "personal and confiden- tial" document from an Army In- telligence officer who took it from the Pentagon's files. Another witness today testilied Brig. Gen. Ralph Zwicker showed an "antagonistic" attitude toward McCarthy three months before Mc- Carthy allegedly "abused" the general while questioning him about Army handling of cases In- volving suspecled Communists. This opinion came from retired MaJ. Gen. Kirke B. Lawton, who said he concluded Zwicker was an- tagonistic toward McCarthy on the basis of a conversation he had with Zwicker in late November or early December, 1953. Lawton had refused to testify on IhU point earlier in the week and tha McCarthy side charged the Pentagon with "gagging" him. a charge the Pentagon denied. Yes- terday Secretary of Defense Wil- son said Lawton could testify on points "not dearly prohibited" by President Eisenhower's executive secrecy order ot last Afay 17. Wilson's ruling also encouraged Zwicker to give his side of the to the special Senate com- investigating a variety of charges (gainst McCarthy. Cbair- man Watkins (R-litah) announced Zwicker will be heard Monday and laid expects public hear- ings to end then. Testimony on tie now-famous "KB! fetter'1 dominated today's session, -with McCarthy 'contending It bore no official se- stamp and declaring that, in any case, be had both the right Califomian Wins As'Miss America1 ATLANTIC CITY, N.J., Sept. 11 (R-Lee Ann Meriwether. a tall, tanned beauty from California, won the Miss America contest to- night. The 19-year-old dark-haired, blue eyed Miss California who is 5 feet was one of the tallest of the 50 contestants in the 1955 pageant. She Is the daughter of Mrs. Ethel Meriwether of San Francisco. and the duty to use such FBI ma- terial on possible subversion. Colin, who was a Justice Depart- ment official before he Joined Mc- Carthy's staff, testified the Wis- consin lawmaker was dead right about the secrecy label. He said secret-documents" always are iden- tified as such by a rubber stamp, while the "letter" in question bore only the typewritten words "per- sonal and confidential." U.S. General Visits Quemoy On Inspection QUEMOY, Sfept. 11 _ U.S. Maj. Gen. William Chase arrived today to inspect the Red-shelled defenses of this island outpost of Nationalist China shortly after Na- tionalist bombers struck new blows at Reds reported massing around nearby Amoy. The visit by the head of the U.S. Military Advisory Group to Nationalist China bolstered the impression in this area that the United Stales has a very strong interest in Nationalist retention of Quemoy, close by the Red China mainland. U. S. May Help It is considered possible that the United States has decided to give the Nationalists all reasonable aid short of military action in pro- tecting offshore islands while not entering into any commitment for intervention if they are attacked. The Nationalist commander. Gen. Liu Yu-chuang, will. Gen. Chase will confer, told visiting newsmen he believed the Russian-equipped Chinese Commu- nists reported ta Amoy "might not dare invade." Liu. in charge of 30.000 men, feels the Heds have beea deterred by the air and artillery retaliation of the Nationalists ifler the Reds began hurling the first at shells at Quemoy Sept. 3. A Nationalist communique said heavy bombers, accompanied by jets, pounded military targets at 2 a.m. today on Amoy. It was the first such claim of dropping heavy bombs during six straight days of retaliatory attacks. At Taipeii today, th? Nationalists issued a warning that any foreign ships entering Amoy port would do so at their own risk. Nationalist planes bombed and strafed the British freighter Inchkilda during an attack on Amoy earlier this week. No Britons were hurt Newsmen who visited Quemoy yesterday and today found farmers and civilians accepling their dan- gerous lot stoically. Nationalist sol- diers appeared confident, almost cocky. ABILENE, TEXAS. SUNDAY MORNING, SEPT. 12, 1954-SIXTY-FOUR PAGES IN FIVE SECTIONS PRICE DAILY 5c, SUNDAY iOc McCaullcyGir Named Hamlin Jubilee Queen See wlnatag pageg-A BY BILL TURNER Stfoittr-Ncws Slaff Writer HAMLIN, Sept. U-Pat Keclor, attractive five-fool-eight brownette of MeCaulley, was crowned queen of the first Tri-Counly Jubilee here Saturday night. She was one of 16 beauty con- leslants who rode an-array of cars and floats "J an afternoon parade down the city's main thoroughfare. The par- ade lasted nearly an hour. Stamford and Merkel High School bands were judged first and second place winners of the six high school bands that set the pace. 5.0W OB Band The crowd witnessing the parade was termed "the biggest Haralin PAT RECTOR crowned Jubilee the parade. Harley Sadler, state senator from Abilene, was in top form as em- exhibiting the showmanship once knew as a profession. The queen contestants were judg- ed on beauty, poise, personality and talent, and one of the most crea- See JUBILEE, Pg. JS-A, Coi. 4 UNPAID VOLUNTEER OFFICER DIRECTS TRAFFIC BRIEFLY The Abilene Police Department had an extra member for awhile Saturday. Shortly before noon the department was told that "a self-made policeman" was at work at North 15th and Hickory Sts. The "officer" was wearing a cap, helt, and whistle and directing traffic. Patrolman F. A. Biddy checked by and reported that the "traffic officer" was directing traffic as reported, and. "dpinf fairly, piddy said he warned the volunteer of the danger of being in the street and got a promise it would not happen again. "I only wanted to be a 7-year-old Roy Gal- biiitii of 1225 North 18th St, told Biddy. Suspect Arrested in Bold Northwest Bonk Robbery SPOKANE, Sept. II IB Police arrested a 21-year-old man in a filled with loaded guns today and said they recovered taken yesterday in the robbery of the Dishman State Bank. Detectives Alfred Stoeser and Menu A. Clinton said the man ad- mitted the bold daylight robbery, one of the biggest in Northwest history. They had gone to the house on a tip that a man was painting a red car in a garage behind a house on Spokane's East Side. They knocked. "The guy let us Stoeser said, "and when Clinton started to look around he pulled a gun on me in the bathroom and said, "You move and I'll kill you.' "Well, he wound up in the bath- tub and I wound up with the gun. Then .he told me, 'You'll find the bank money in a suit case under the bed'." Police said the man gave the name George Quatsliag. Police found more than 50 loaded pistols and rifles in the house and were searching for others. AIRMAN NEEDS WRITTEN CONSENT Bride, Groom, Guests Await Letter Bj DOS NORR1S In most cases six-months doesn't mean a lot to a man. But Saturday night it meant everything to 20 (and year-old Martin Dovvhower of Her- shcy. Pa., and his fiancee, 18- jear-oM Ndl Haltman of Wylie. A houseful of wedding guests and a Baptist preacher were also well aware of the six months Dow- hower lacked being in his major- ity. Uarlia and KeH had planned to married Saturday night at the of Nell's sister, Mrs. Joe Rfld, HIT Clinton St. They made the decision Thurs- day when Marlin arrived here from Larson Air Force near THE WEATHER Jphrala, Wash., on When] hey applied for a marriage li- :ense Marlin was told he would ave to have written consent from ij parents. He called his mother and father, ilr. and Mrs. Earl Dowhower In {ershey, Pa. and got their bless- ngs. They were to send consent air mail special delivery. The letter hadn't arrived Satur- lay at the 8 p.m. wedding hour, t still wasn't here at 10 p.m. and he last scheduled Pioneer plane rom the cast had come and gone. The bride-to-be, the groom-to-be, the preacher and the wedding guests were still on hand at 10 i.m. Mrs. Reid saiJ the couple still had hopes of getting married Sal urday night, P. t. DEMH.TMEXT OF ItVEAU ABlLEfE AM) VJCI.S7TY Fair and Sanday ana Monday. Hub both dan mar K. nUl lit knr r TO ieerws. NORTH CENTRAL TKXAS Centrally fair Sraday JlaiMar; HVitty warmer fiaaday. WEST TF.XAS CIm to partly tloodj Snndar and Monday; wVJrlr icatttrK cf an4 19 M Pax rut Miar.cc bt EAST TEXAS Crnwally fair Sunday and Monday; no Imrortapl ctianFet. SOITTH CENTRAL TEXAS Tartly doodr Sutfay and Mnculay: icattrrtd jftavrn la cxtrtmr aoolA 5caday Asd la and msl rorllnnt llnoday. TEMPCMntES Sat.A.M. Sal.T.V M U W .Irtl May a.m. Mtxn  Anrntmcnts 12-13 StCTtON D Wlut't MW CWk-n........ 10-11 12 Debt Paid: Grocer Gets Haitian Stamp Jim Saunders tsf Baltimore, Md. wafted into the A. F. GUsmanh Grocery Store, 1017 Sooth Seventh St., Saturday and handed' Glas- mann a small red stamp to square an 11-year-old debt VBack: i. uc. white Saunden was sUUdried Camp garkeley, he went into the store and bought tome meat. .He lacked one red meat ration stamp having enough. Glasmanp told hun to be sure to bring the' stamp the next time be came in the store. The next morning Saunders ship- ped oot So, his nejrt, lift to Abilene (Sat he brought the1 stamp wit] him. Mr. and Mrs. Sannders had .here with Mr. and Mrs. Chester Roberta ai. 1025 South Seventh St. Roberts: now lire at 187< Jeanette.St where the Saunderes are vishjog ttem in then- first trip back in 11 years. Saunden can go back to bis borne in Baltimore all square with a Texas grocer. Hurricane Splits Self In 2 Parts BOSTON, Sept. U W-Hurricsna Edna, torn in two by own fury, grazed the populous northeast coast in a breathtaking near-miss today end churned angrily past southern Maine. As the storm beaded into Bay of Fundy and Nova Scotia, one of its two. eyes passed tonight di- rectly over Bar Harbor, Maine, summer playground of million- aires, the state's civil defense chief reported. In darkened Bangor, in the path of the other eye, civil defense crews sweated to evacuate resi- dents of low lying areas along Penobscot River. Maine was cut off from tbe rest of New England by road and rail Floods and washouts, cut tracks, and -highways in so many places officials could not keep count. Pub- lic agencies were chary of esti- mates but damage to property and crops seemed certain to run into millions. Early tonight its center was about 80' miles southeast ot Port-. land, its-winds op 120 m.p.h. were advancing north- northeast or northeast about' m.pi. BnstesUaslte The season's fifth hurricane brushed the Atlantic coastline from New Jersey north with high HOPE SEATS AVAILABLE County Demo Caucus Okays 38 for Convention Passes A list of 38 Taylor County dele- gates to the State Democratic Con- vention was selected Saturday for whom it is hoped convention floor passes can be obtained. The state convention, expected to last only one day, win open Tuesday morning in Mineral Wells. The Taylor County Democratic Convention named about 200 dele- gates to attend the convention and because of limited political space and heightened political interest, only 22 seats have been assigned to Taylor .County at tbe .convention. The county is entitled to 52 votes. Parceling of the 22 seats among so many delegates was the pro- blem of the caucus of convention delegates Saturday afternoon in Taylor County courtroom. The caucus ordinarily would not have been held until the night be- fore tbe convention at Mineral Wells. Bob Wagstaff, chairman of the delegation, called the caucus early to discuss tbe sealing pro- Mineral Wells Draws Demos DOWN, BOY! Driver Valincli Gonwles, 85, of San Angelo, pulled the emergency brake to nuke a stop Satur- day afternoon Butternut .St. North Treidtwsy Blvd. Lo and bthold, wu booked to Uw power take-off operating the dump bed! Part of the load of feed belonging to Stokes Feed Co. of San Angelo was dumped onto the highway and remainder shifted, raising the truck up on iU hind vhMlt. (Photo by RobeiU Studio) MINERAL WELLS, Sept. Tetas Democrats gathered here today for an Allan Shivers' jubilee convention to naQ down his vic- tory, but there was also the usual prospect of opposition static. Notice of contests have been filed from 23 coonty delegations. That means series of running bat- tles beginning Monday with hear- ings before the credentials sub- committee of the Stale Executive Conuniltee. Decisions ot the executive com- mittee may be appealed to the floor of the convention. That could lead to floods of oratory and hours ol vote-counting before the Shivers farces can tamally assert their certain control. The governor not only won Ms third elective term In the summer but bit friends nw apparent majority of dele- gates named at cotraly coavtntiocs la July.. Shim himself announced this had ao doubts about ail margu; ot ooalroi blem so that several times that many delegates would not go to Mineral WeHs expecting to be seat- ed and be disappointed. Wagstaff said that although Tay- lor County has been assigned only 22 be believes it will be possible to obtain or 10 more. Be explained that extra seats may be available at the list, minute because delegations from counties in distant parts of the state may not use all of tbe seats assigned to them. He added that some of tbe Tay- lor County delegation may be able to release tbeir seats to others in the delegation while serving DO committees or that delegates may simply around their passes so that various ones can attend the convention at different times. Selection of those who will have first caQ.oo floor passes was made on basis of those most entitled to seats on the basis of their posi- tions in. tbe'delegation, activities during the recent political cam- paign .and then in ao effort to distribute seats among ai many of the county's voting boxes as possible. Wagstaff as delegation chairman, T. N. Carswelt ai secretary and Torn Eplen as vice chairman were assigned priority to seats. Others chosen because of positions held or tbeir contributions of time, ef- fort and money (luring the gover- nor's race were Sen. Harley Sad- ler, Mrs. R. M. Freeman, Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Grant, French Robertson aad Mr, and Mrs. Mor- gan Jones, Jr. Next in line to be seated are James Binion, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Cosby, Ed Kniffen, Sid E. Pass, Mr. and Mrs. 0. J. Hamilton, Dr. acd Mrs. DonaW McDonp.W, Mr. and Mrs. John A. Mstthews, C. G. Whitten, Mr. and Mrs. Jade Minter, Jr., Earl Raucb, Mel Thur- man, W. E. Fraley, Dub ffofford, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Boren, Dr. and Mrs. HaroW G. Cooke, Dr. Medfort Evans, Dr. and Mrs. C. B. Gardner, Mr. and Mrs. Ford Smith and Robert Kicks. wave and torrential rains up to. seven Detailed warning.' and shoreline evacuation kept the damage down. Southern New sTfmly respectful of Caribbean staftas ait' er deyastatiw-btows UH and only 11 ago..watched open-mouthed as the big blow slid past with far less apparent damage thaniad been Storm deaths totalled nine, nvwt of them in highway accidents. Three' New Englahders died, in- cluding a man who came in con- tact with a dangling electric wirt, Nantiicket lightship, guide fat westbound liners at the "Crost- EDNA, Pf. 15-A. t Another Gulf Storm Spotted BROWNSVILLE, Tex., SepL ,11 Brownsville Weather Bu- reau said today it had been advised by the New Orleans Weather Bu- reau that a very small hurricane had been located about ISO miles southeast of Tampico, Mexico, in the.Gulf of Mexico. It was named Florence. In an advisory at 5 p.m., the New Orleans Weather Bureau said an aircraft spotted the hurricane. It reported winds of 75 miles an center with gales up to -100 miles to northeast and 50 mile u hoar winds to the west and south ol the center. Tbe hurricane was reported mov- ing about 5 miles an hour in west-northwest direction. The New Orleans bureau said ft would issue another hurricane ad- visory at 10 pm. tonight. Earlier, at 4 p.m.. Weather Bu- reau officials at Veracna and Tam- pico, Mex., reported the blow as a "severe tropical storm." A large waterspout was reported near Isla de Lobos, approximately fit) miles south of Tampico. In Tarn- pico itseli tides were about three feet above normal, causing general alarm among UK hurricane-wary populace. Such tides often precede hurricanes. Weather Bureau observers at Tampico said last night the storm might strike between Soto La Ma- rina aiid Matamoros across from Brownsville, Tex., sometime today. Apparently, it swerved. Massive Typhoon Heads for Japan TOKYO, Sunday, Sept. 12 (in Typhoon June, a massive oceanic storm rated equal of Uu IM4 Muroto typhoon which killed 2.W2 persons and destroyed Or.ty other business conducted (homes, was moving in on Japaa by the riucus was to endorse today with a power punch Wagstaff for the 24th senatorial mile-per-bour winds aad torrential district on tha State Democratic Executive Committee Tbe typhoon wu so Hut ft and Mrs. Nonnan Read of Big coveted a front aad wtafc Sprinf for the district committee- on tbe iwirliaf tttift Ut milw tar. f   

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