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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, September 8, 1954 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 8, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               SCATTERED SHOWERS X EVENING "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS It VOL. LXXIV, NO. 84 AuodatedPreu (AP) ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 8, 1954 RAGES IN TWO SECTIONS FINAL PRICE DAILY Sc, SUNDAY IOC SHE'S OK Pat Eager To Grapple Bulls Again DEL McCor- mick, girr bullfighter gored by a big black bull last Sunday, is going to be all right, her physician said today. The physician said he didn't be- lieve Pat would do any more bull- fighting this season. But she's eager to return. Her lattixi-. Mrs. S.Z JitCiifisid; at Big Spring, Tex., said that even when Pat was semi-conscious, she kept saying, "Tell them I'll fight them again." Mrs. McCormick said she felt sure Pat would want to fight again as soon as she was able. The 24-year-old girl had been in critical condition since her second bull in the Sunday afternoon bull fight at the Ciudad Acuna, Hex., ring across from Del Rio had charged and impaled her on his horns. She suffered injuries in her pelvic region and underwent sur- asry Sunday night. Last night she came through the crisis. Gen. Zwicker Cursed Solon. Witness LETTERS SAVED HIM 2, sits sobbing on the ground beside her baby buggy in Ft Myer, Va, as older chil- dren file into school at opening of the term Janice's brother, Ronney, already is inside the building. Janice doesn't understand why she can't join him Commissioner Says J udge's Report on Deeds County Commissioner Rufe Tittle of Merkel Wednesday brand- ed and untrue" a statement by County Judge Reed lugalsbe concerning deeds to High- SO right-of-way in Precinct 2. Tittle referred to Judge Ingals- be's statement that Tittle has held the deeds since March 23. 19p without taking any action toward buying the right-of-way necessary for making U. S. 80 an express- way. VI bought-.the right- of --way needed for- the overpass west of .Tittle declared, "and at tbi present time I do not have in re? possession any "deed on the basis of which.I could buy any (Under policies of the Texas Highway Department, it is neces- sary for the county to provide the right-of-way before the state will build the highway, using state and federal funds. Customary proced- ure is for the highway department to sarvey the righUof-way, prepare the deeds covering the land and turn the deeds over to the county commissioner who then buys the RUFE TITTLE .'M deeds received' land from the owner, using pre- cinct funds.) Tittle said the highway depart was needed for the present over- pass immediately west of Trent. (This overpass straddles the coun- ty line, part of it being in Taylor County and part being in Nolan County.) Highway Route Changed The commissioner added that he has been unable to buy any more of the right-of-way because the plan .for U. S. 80 in the Trent area .has .been changed. "They (the highway depart- ment) are making a different sur- vey for the highway around Tittle satated, "and I have not received the corrected deeds Therefore, I have been unable to bur the land Tittle said he has not yet re- ceived any of the deeds for the 0. S; 80 right-of-way between Trent and Merkel or east of Merkel in Precinct Z. He explained that because be does not know exactly.how much land will be needed for the .U. S 80 expressway in Precinct 2 he has SAN ANTONIO 3V-Most of the taiericans who chose to stay with Communists did so because fear, Cpl. Claude Batchelor aid today at his court-martial. Batchelor, 22-year-old Kermit, ex., youth, is on trial- on charges aiding the eaemy while a prison- r of war. His court-martial at ort Sam Houston here began ug. 30. In the latter pages of a long atement scheduled to be com- eted today and read into the ourt-martial record, the corporal aid: "I think that most of them tayed because of fear. Very, few them had the intellect to really understand that they were fighting r peace." Batchelor was speaking of the at Kaesong prior to the explainer" talks by United Na- ons personnel. The statement aid that Cpl. Edward Dickenson Cracker's Neck, Va., had [ready been repatriated at this ime: -v JDickenson was tried and given 0 years at hard labor on charges imilar to those against Batchelor. Dickenson was not too well liked the POW .anyway, iatchelof's statement said> Batchelor said letters from his mother and "commonplace Amef- cans" set him to thinking and changed his Communist sympathj o hating Communism. "If I get the chance the state- ment ended. "I want to do so hing to make up for what I have ment sent him the deeds' covering been unable to recommend the U. S. 80 right-of-way from the west Taylor County line eastward about S miles and that he bought slightly less than one mile which TEXANS JUST INDEPENDENT Shivers Denies He Won by GOP Vote AUSTIN Allan Shivers today scornfully rejected claims that ho won his second primary Democratic nomination with Re- publican votes. At the same time Shivers made it clear at a press conference that so long as he controls the Mineral Wells convention next week, he will also control membership of the State Democratic Executive Committee for the next two years. Shivers was asked for comment on a statement by GOP national committeeman Jack Porter that Republican voters were responsi- ble for Shivers' reelection. Porter had isked Panhandle Democrats to return the favor and help elect a GOP congressional candidiate, Leroy LaMaster of Perryton. "That puts Porter in the same bucket with'Ralph Yarborough and tbt CIO." Shivers replied. Later he added that he-thought all Texas congressmen elected this fall will be Democrats. Shivers said he thought his vic- tory over Yarborough was a "re- statement of independence by the Texas electorate." He said he was talking about the kind of independence Texas voters showed in 1952. That was the year Shivers led Texas Demo- crats in support of Dwight D. Ei- senhower, the Republican nominee for President, defying tradition. Shivers said that 90 per cent o: the votes against him. in the Democratic primaries were no vote "for Yarborough" bul "against Shivers." "Independent means not bcinj harnessed to anyone, indcpendcn of outside the gover nor said further in discussing cam paifn factors. Shivera reiterated previous stale mwU that it the national Demo- cratlc party-will rid otste- plMi MUcUeir, tlit national chair- mad, and s ttwi may bt ef a ptwMentUl can; MctpUUt to Texas DM South. Ht wouldn't comment on his ifcle attitude towvd Adlal Steven ton for 1M nomination f Shivers Hiked if Iht SUt emocratic Executive Committee lat will serve for the next two j ears will be friendly to him. "You betcha boots it will be if e have a majority at the conven- on." the governor replied. Was there any doubt about con- j-ol he was asked. The reply was o, but that he was merely trying o qualify his answer to the ques- on. Shivers said district caucus rec- mmentations for executive com- mittee memberships at Mineral Veils would be followed "except they were unfriendly." Shivers said that "it might be good guess" that Galloway Cal- oun of Tyler would be the Mineral tells keynoter., He also said he did not know vhcther or not the Sept. 14 conven- tion would take any action in re- to Wright Morrow.; Morrow s recognized as national commit- eeman from Texas byvthe. state organization, but is with he national commiUte. amount of bonds that will be necessary to buy the land. No funds are now available in Pre- cinct 2 to buy the right-of-waj and a. bond issue will be required Tittle said he has received a rough estimate of from West Texas Utilities Co. on the cost of moving power lines to make way for tfie expressway Present U. S. 80 right-of-way in Precinct 2 is 100 feet wide. This will have to be widened to 261 feet for the straight portions o the highway and more" for inter sections. Mercury to Hit 98 Today; Rain Clouds Disappear Showers-around Abilene seen- to have faded. Weather Bureai officials said Wednesday. Before they left, they dumpec .32 of an inch of rain at Municipa Airport and a few drops down town. Other spots reported rains the Cedar Gap community re ceived 1.11' inches, Mrs. 5. D Earnest reported. Wednesday was to be hot, wit! 98 degrees. The weather ma said the'night temperature shoul fall to 79 degrees because th relatively clear and dry weathe would permit the earth to radial off the sun's heat rapidly. Burglar Flees Belmpnl Blvd. Home When Woman Awakes Mrs R. LeeBradshaw, WSJ Bel-1 Three theft reports were aU nont Blvd., told pouce Ml being investigated am Wednesday that a burglar morning. pital, stolen North han just ITOBI Slw said that when she awoke, she found a man crouched down reside her. Fear Held Yonks done that might in some way have seen detrimental to my country." The non-repatriates were forbid- den to read letters from home but Batchelor eventually read his ecretly in a latrine. He described a letter from his mother as "...very appealing and [uite v different from what I had expected. She was' writing ex- remely anti-communistic, plead- ng for me to come home. She id not seem to know much about politics but nevertheless her letter was enough to make me think a great deal. "Before, from previous letters, always wrote (sic) against but none of the letters were anti communistic. Grand Jurors Due to Report The District.Court grand ury was expected to make a re- late Wednesday afternoon )istrict Attorney Wiley Caffej said Wednesday morning. Up to noon about 53 witnesses lad appeared before the group to >e interrogated, according to Eai iff M. N. Oldhrm. About 45 complaints had been submitted to the grand jury for consideration. Fewer witnesses sa in the corridor during the fore- noon waiting to be summoned in side the grand jury room. Jurors retired to deliberat about a. m. Tuesday afte hey had been briefly charged bj 42nd District Court Judge J. R Black. Likely, when they mak their report the court will allow them a recess until the middle of October, when they will resume their sitting and finish the 42nd Court's investigative task. Judge Black said. No civil suit was being tried Wednesday. The court is acting on divorce 'petitions. DIPLOMAT DULLES utbfiei McCarthy WASHINGTON UB-A witness at the McCarthy censure hearings testified today he heard Brig. Gen. Ralph W. Zwicker mutter "you S.O.B." at- Sen. McCarthy at a public hearing in New York last Feb. 18. William J. Harding 3r., New York City salesman, jelated the alleged incident. Harding was called as the second witness as Edward Bennett Wil- liams, attorney for McCarthy, be- the conversation. He cited a direo- ve by President Eisenhower for- idding disclosure of private con- ersations within the executive ranch of the government.: Law-ton said he was taking his land on advice of "various coun- sel" at the Peatagon.- CtOi H "Giggnc" Williams protested that the Ar- my was "gagging" Lawton'without ustification, but said be. would not Jemand that the censure investi- gan presenting the senator's de- Cations'committee order Lawton fense against the censure charges. One charge' is that McCarthy abused William" called as his first wit- ness Maj. Gen.. Erie B. Lawton, former commander of Ft Mon- mouth, N. J-, and sought testimony from him about a private conver- sation with Zwicker. Lawton declined to testify about Asian Pact Signed By Eight Nations MANILA W Eight nations of the East and the West signed a collective security pact today which in effect warns the Commu- nists against any further aggres- sion in Southeast Asia. It took just three days for the United States, France, Great Bri- tain, Australia, New Zealand, Thai- land, Pakistan and the Philippines to reach complete accord. The treaty hangs a big "no" tres- passing1' sign on small nations in the area. It binds the eight na- tions militarily and economically, and declares each party will meet the "common danger" of armed attack in the treaty area or against any member "in accordance with its constitutional processes." Casey Opens Sifting Australia's Richard G. Casey was first to sign the historic docu- ment He began affixing his sig- nature to the various copies at p.m. ajn., The documents, about 12x18 inches, were bound in dark blue leather. The ministers signed with individual gold pens, Casey was followed by France's Guy la Chambre, New Zealand's T. Clifton Webb and Pakistan's Sir Mohammed Zafrullah Khan. Tne entire Philippine delegation then signed, led by Vice President Carlos P. Garcia, chairman of the conference. The Philippine delegation, ressed in native_ tagalog shirts, followed by Thailand's Prince fan Waithayakon and Great Bri ain's Lord Reading. Is Last the treaty just north of the north- ern tip of the Philippines, but short of Chinese nationalist Formosa. The treaty stipulated that otbtr counmeycouTd'join. The, pact, consisting pre- ambk and 11 ar-jdes. military agree- ment, patterned after the Aus- tralia-New-Zealand United State mutual1 defense pact "to meet' the common danger" of armed attack in the treaty area or against any member according o the constitutional provisions of he respective countries. 2. Calls for consultation and co- operation among members to de- 'elop economic measures "de- lisned to.promote economic- sta- lility and social well being" in Southeast Asia. 3. .Establishes a council which 'shall be so organized as .to be When she tried to scream, she said, the man held something over licr mouth. However, managed to scream anyway. Then the man ran out the back and down the driveway toward the atttti. Mrs Braisoaw flfttrrtCtift In- truder mat tan M no Policemen Garland Black and M. runninf. Police said the buriuu wUnd throufh M unbdMd back .nd departed the Nothing was motetted or stolen, invtstifatini offlcm said, intruder Abilene State Has reported his bicycle was Tuesday morning -from First and Pine SU loye of firm. nfWEATHBt able to meet at any time" to carry out the treaty terms. 4. Defines the treaty area to 'include, all of Southeast Asia anc the western Pacific sector but no Nationalist China's stronghold on Formosa. S: SupportSFr'cootinuous and e fective self-help and mutual aid' among member nations to resist armed attack and prevent snbver sive activity directed from outside the country. 6. Upholds the charter of the United Nations. The economic framework of the treaty prove the most effec- tive step hi gaming stronger sup- port for democracy in Asia. Red- threatened Laos, Cambodia" and free Viet Nam will benefit from both the economic and military benefits of the pact. PLEA FROM A FATHER Please Core for Between Home, School EDITOR'S fol- lowing points a valuable les- son. It is worth reading...and keeping. Tuesday my daughter, who is 7 years old, started to school as usual. She wore a dark blue dress with a white collar. She had on black shoes and wore blue gloves. Her cocker spaniel, whose name is Coot, sat on the front porch and whined his canine belief in the fol- ly of education as she waved good- bye and started off to the hall of learning. Last night She's a nice kid. She can run like a. deer and dart about- like chipmunk She likes to ride horses and swim'and hike with me o Sunday afternoons. But I can't be with her all the time; I. have t work to pay for her clothes an her education. So please help m look out for her. Please driv slowly past the schools and inter sections and please remember hat children run from faehinc parked cars. Please don't rue over my little girL we talked about DETAWrJOHST W COMXEBCK WEAtMa untKAC AND VICINITY lotoy. tontufct. IBWKtlturt fecms: CtvtHAL TEXAS FjrUT tOT xlOi iriittr KMtwtil nmOy Mtarawm school. She told me about the girl who sits in front of her, the girl with yeliow curls, and the boy across the aisle who makes funny faces. She told me about her teach- er, who has eyes in the back of her head, and the trees in the school yard, and about the big girl who doesn't believe in. Santa Claus. We talked about a lot of things tremendously vital, un- important things, and then we studied spelling, reading, arithme- then to bed. She's back there in the nursery sound asleep, with "Princess Elizabeth" (that's her doll) cuddled in her right arm. You guys wouldn't hurt her, would vou? 'You see, I'm her dad- dy. When her doll is broken or her finger is cut or her head gets ampcd, 1'csr. Ss wher. she starts to school, when she walks across Out street, thea she's in your hands. P.M. Tl Tt II A Jf. 7i M tm, M WHERE IT RAINED ABILENE Municipal Akport..........a Total for Year Normal hr Year 11.M CEDAR GAP................ 1.11 COLORADO CITY HASKELL......i........... Tr QUANAH Tr ROBY ..I to testify. Chairman Walk ins (R-Utah) said, however, the" committee hould consider that question on ts own. Watkins ordered a Tecess of the oublic hearing at 3Jn. EOT while the six-member iscussed in closed door meeting whether it should direct, that Law- on answer questions. Williams told a reporter during the recess that unless Lawton re- urned to the witness stand Mc- Carthy himself would be the next witness; Eft This Williams said the investigation could end this week a view that Sen. Watkins also gave some support to. Before the recess, Sen. Case (R- SD) suggested at one point that the committee call Zwicker to testify, saying that through direct examination of him the committee might be able to develop the testi- mony that "counsel for Sen. Mc- Carthy wants to develop" from Lawton. Williams commented "that" he didnt think; Zwicker would be "eager to testify-to the Acts.. I hope to devetop" through question- ing Lawton. Harding told the committee that he has lived in New York for 60 and conducts a small sales agency. "1 am a he said Was AnfieKC Harding then related he was in the audience on the morning of Feb. 18 when the McCarthy In- vestigations 'subcommittee was conducting hearings on-.the ease of Maj. Irving Peress, by McCarthy as a "Fifth-Amendment Communist." He related that McCarthy asked Zwicker to stand up" and answer several questions. When Zwicker sat down, Harding, testified, "I distinctly heard him mutter under his breath: "You S.O-B.'" Harding told the committee Zwicker then turned to two officers sitting on his right and said farther: "You see, I told you this is what we'd get." Zwicker was then commander of Camp Klmer, N.J., where Peress had been stationed. McCarthy con- tended at the time that Peress should have been coort-martialed instead 01 being given an honor- able discharge. Peress, as a witness before Mc- Carthy, has refused to answer questions as to whether he had bad Communist associations. IN 2 INJECTIONS Solk Says Simple Immunity Possible ROME Dr. Jonas E. Salk, whose polio vaccine is undergoing one of m e d i c a 1 history's most closely watched tests, report- ed today that man eventually may gain long-term immunity against crates antibodies virus-fighting particles in the blood streams of vaccinated persons. He laid they are equal to antibodies foand ia the Wood of persons who recovered from the disease. polio from as little as two injec-i "The indications are; that TOCh jons. The young bacteriologist from from the University of Pittsburgh submitted his eagerly awaited re- to pnysiCions auu scjsnviSw of 48 nations, gathered in Rome for International Poliomyelitis Congress. Salk developed the vaccine which has been given to children in the United Sutes ia massive trial supported by the National Foundation for Infantile Paraly- sis. v. .Us effectiveness will not be known definitely until next March, when Uw field results are evaluated and announced by Dr. Tliomas Francis Jr. ol the Uni- versity of Michigan, Siuk't mntw and a defefrtt ttw But Sak U tvidwct that UN vaedM can be accomplished with' as tew as two be ropwtod, "pmided the potency oMtevfM- cUie and the interval (between stets arc both sdajuateZ' It is still not certain bow long the effect of the will hot, Salk said, "That there is ttill much to bt learned is dear indeed. Neverthe- less, it does appear that by suitable manipulation of the of vaccine add ot the intervals be- tween 'Inoculations, it snouM pouibit wuh relativity few tions spaced to preriot lou-ttra iaamMty." Salk said and his associate. MW an Bad out It sbtrtHt "ta nm" (fid. "R ir'dMr that ttw'Moml' h IlYV WOMSi j   

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