Abilene Reporter News, September 5, 1954

Abilene Reporter News

September 05, 1954

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Issue date: Sunday, September 5, 1954

Pages available: 62

Previous edition: Saturday, September 4, 1954

Next edition: Monday, September 6, 1954

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Publication name: Abilene Reporter News

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Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - September 5, 1954, Abilene, Texas FAIR, HOT®ije    toorter-Betoii    S11IVD/\Y"WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES"—Byron VOL. LXXIV. NO. 81 AikkìhuA Pnu (AP)ABILENE, TEXAS, SUNDAY MORNING, SEPT. 5, 1954—SIXTY PAGES IN FIVE SECTIONS PRICE DAILY 5c, SUNDAY lOt ____—- —--»w— 87 People Die in US By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Seventy-iwo persons were killed in traffic accidents on the nation's highways during the first 26 hours of the long Labor Day weekend. The total death list, from 6 p.m. Friday through 8 p.m. Saturday was 87, including 8 drown-ings and 7 deaths from miscellaneous causes. The National Safety Council 2 Americans Lose Lives On Quemoy T.VIPEH, Formosa, Sunday, ':'pt. 5 tfL—Guns on the Red main-ind of China yesterday intermit-'nlly bombarded Quemoy Island here already their shells have lied two U. S. .Army officers. Tlie attack on the Chinese Na-malist strong'iold is being »•atched closely in Washington. “We are alert to our responsibilities in the area,’.’ a Defense De-»rtment spokesman said. The two .Americans killed in a ve-hour artillery attack on Que-noy Friday were members of the 1 1111 a r y .Assistance .Advisory Group of Formosa They were: Drad Listed I.t. Col. Frank W Lynn. Medical Corps, whose wife, Mrs. El-eaner Lynn, lives at Chicago. I.t. Col. Alfred Mendendorp. infantry. whose father, Cornelius Mendendorp, lives at 117 Griggs St. S W., Grand Rapids, Mich. The two officers were on a training and inspection mission to Quemoy, seven miles off the Red-held mainland, across th« Formosa Strait from Formosa. In Washington, Fred A. Seaton, assistant secretary of the Defense l>epartment, told a news confer-eiKt the diriment is “alert to oitf reaponsibililies” in the Que-nwiy region. He added that “certain unit« of our fleet are at sea” The U. S 7th Fleet is in Formosa Strait * under oi-ders to protect Formosa, the seat of Chiang Kai-shek's Nationalist government, from Communist invasion. Seaton said, however, he was not aware of any “specific orders” to the fleet to protect any other National ist Islands. Seaton told reporters the V S found the relatively low traffic toll encouraging. Commented President Ned H. Dearborn: “If this low death rate is maintained, the toll will be considerably below our estimate of 390 for the three-day weekend. And we w'ill be delighted if it is.” Dearborn commented that the traffic toll in the early stages was similar to the tallies in the corresponding period of this year’s Independence Day holiday. The three day traffic toll then was 348. Most of the nation had dry weather. Millions of motorists were on the roads. National Guardsmen joined police in three states in a counteroffensive against recklessness on the highways. In Michigan 668 soldiers reinforced state police in patrolling roads. Airplanes and helicopters flew patrol over the highways. In Wisconsin a unit of about 86 National Guard MPs was called out to help in traffic patrol work. Some 300 volunteer National Guardsmen are on duty along Tennessee’s major highways, urging miHorists to drive carefully, Louisiana state police planes dropped leaflets urging drivers to “slow down and live” State police troopers there are working 12-hour shifts. Experts at the National Safely Council have predicted that traffic fatalities will total 390 in the holiday period It began at 6 p.nv Friday and will end at midnight Monday. LIGHT TAKEN FROM POLICE DALITS, Sept 4 I# - Two policemen hunted a theft with more than the usual vigor today. The culprit stole a spotlight from their car last night as they made an invesiigation. NO RAIN Holiday Outings To Be in Order Fair weather with high temperatures near the 95-degree mark la in store for l.abor Day celebrants Sunday and Monday in Abilene and surrounding area. The Weather Burau forecast calls goTe'rnmenT'if’watchirig ' the Quo-' for good picnic weather both days “but we have ao! and even adds a timely note for moy situation idea on the extent to which it might go or where it stops” A Chinese Nationalist army s^K»ke«man said the Communists probably would soon attempt an invasion of Quemoy Lt. Gen, Chang Yl-ting. head of the Defense Ministry’s political section, however, said there is no concrete evidence of a Red invasion buildup. He added: “We are prepared for anything ’’ The U. S officers were killed bv a shell which hit a bunker where they had taken refuge. those unlucky enough to have to build the iMcnic cooking fires. Wind 18 expei'ted to be mild and from a southeasterly direction. An in case the little lady tries to load down the family jalopy with an old rusty umbrella or two, the Weather Bureau says no rain is fwecast. Business in Abilene will be at a standstill on Monday as all mem-t>er firms of the Abilene Chamber of Commerce, banks, and city, county, state, and federal offices will be closed for Labor Day. Follow 'Red Arrow' Signs To Form North of Potosi Tlie Sam Beam. Jr . farm. í 5, about five miles until you approach miles north of Potosi. will be easily j Ray’s Servie« Station, a compara-atvessible to those attending the :    large,    two-story    structure. Reporter-News first annual Soil ¡    ^    ^ Day program Tuesday    farm-lo-market The ruuU    j®,    |    road to Potosi intersecu at a farm will be    désignât^    y j    ^ • red arrow directional signs along ,    ^ the highway.    !    ^ ^    you    etane    to To reach the Beam farm from Abilene drive to Treadaway Boulevard and travel it south to the intersection of South nth. Turn east on South 11th. the old route (rf U. S. Highway 80, and travel the main entrance gate to the Soil Day activities Directional signs wiH be installed along the Potosi road to guide visitors ABaSNK OLD UJS. 60 U.S. Pledges To Support Philippines MANILA. Sunday, Sept. 5 iP -The United States has promised the Philippines substantial aid in building up their armed forces and quick help in case of attack. U.S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles told the Philippines’ representatives during mutual defense talks yesterday: “I wish to state in the most emphatic terms that the United States will honor fully it commitments under the mutual defense treaty. If the Philippines were attacked, the United States would act immediately.” The Filipinos appeared highly pleased with Dulles’ statement. After the meeting of Dulles and Carlos P. Garcia. Philippine vice president and foreign minister, and their aides, one of the Filipinos ■ was asked if there was anything I they wanted frwn the United States and didn’t get. He merely shook his head and smiled broadly. A joint communique said: “The Philippine government presented specific proposals for the strengthening of its armed forces for external defense, including a plan to reorganize its army on a four-division basis “The United Stales concurred in the necessity for this objective. Secretary Dulles stated the United States would furnish the major portion of the military material requirements for such an expansion of the army and would search for ^ means to assist the Philippines to- : ward meeting the toreign exchange : and other burdens occasioned | there.”    _ Plane Crashes Near Putnam; 4 Aboard Escape Injuries The pilot and three passengers escaped injury Saturday when a private airplane crashed on takeoff about seven miles north of Putnam. M. M. Brantley of Midland was pilot of the Piper Tn-Pacer that; petition for writ of mandamus wai EDC Death May Stir Soviet Security Plan OPERATION GLORY BEGINS—A white A.my jeep leads a convoy of eight dark green Russian-built mortuarv trucks between two long line of white gloved honor guards as Operation Glorv, the exchange of war dead between U. N. and Communists began Sept. 1 in Kork. There were 193 Americans among the first 200 exchanged. The other seven were unidentified. At right are U. S. soldiers and at left are South Korean troops. Court Writ Asked Texas Deaths In Kent Dispute 'HheloSix By LON PATE Reporter .News Correspondent HASKELL. Sept 4 (RNS> — A crashed. Ttve three passengers were not identified. A spokesman from the Civil Aeronautics .Association control tower at Municipal Airport here said the pilot “advised us that the plane suffered major damage.” The C.AA spokesman said the plane crashed about 6:20 p.m., apparently on take-off from a private landing field. The pikk and passengers went to Midland Saturday night by car. NEWS INDEX SICTION A C-CitY ioard ..... .. . 5 Prop«rty Gworded..... 6 Letters ......... ... 7 Adloi Stevenson...... .. . B GOP Convention...... . 10 Oil news 12-12 SICTION B Reporter-News Soil Dey 1 McMwrry opens ■ . . ■ f C»ty Hell Beot ..... » Editeriels . . . . . . . 10 Book News . 11 SECTION C Septemker brides ... 1 Newcomer« . . 7 Hollywood beewty . . B Pesbionebly speekinf 10 SICTION C Sport« ..... . 1-1, 12 Amusement« . «-5 Church new« .. 10 Perm, merkot«....... .. 11 filed in the di.strict clerk’s office here at 2 p m. Saturday in an effort to force three Kent County commissioners to meet with the Conimis.sioners’ Court at Jaytoo and designate a courthouse there. The petition alleges that as result of arbitrary action of three of the county’s commissioners in refusing to meet and designate Jayton as the county seat, that Kwit County is in effect without government. Heariag Friday Hearing on the petition has been set for 10 a m. Friday in 39th District Court here. Judge 0. L. Parish of Ballinger, district judge of the ll9th Judicial District, will preside. Thirty-ninth District Judge Ben Charlie Chapnvan is disqualified by reason of previous action as trial judge in the county seat election cwitest and other proceedings developing out of the controversy. 'Hie case is styled the State of Texas et al vs. Mark Cave et al. The defendants are hlark Cave of Clairemont. commissioner of Precinct 4; Jim Wyatt of Girard, commissioner o# Precinct 2; and A. C Cargile of Polar, commissioner of Precinct 24 PlalaUffs There are 24 plaintiffs, including cotuity officials. The petition al^e« that the mandate of the Civil Court of Ap peals at Eastland, issued July 29. 1954, officially. legally and finally removed the county sesA from Clairemont to Jajion and that Jayton has been from that date the legal county seat. It further states that on or about July 29 and continuously since that date and on numerous occasions the plaintiff John H. Montgomery, cqunty judse and presidmg officer See DISPUTE. Pg. *-A. Col. S THE WEATHER r. • Drr4«TMKXT or ì ommkbce WEATHta BlKEAl ABILENE A.ND VICINITY-Falr. bo* muiB ciion«» m to«ip«r*»iire Sunday **d . Monday Hi«h bo*à day* M Low Sunday j ■tiht 70 U> 75.    ' north CENTBAL TEXAS! Fair tlirousW Monday. No Importan* icmpera-tur* rtiaiura.    ....    _ WF7ST TEXAS: GewaUy fair Oirwisli Monday, «»«pt low Uiuiidortbowor*. mom-ly wott of Pocot VaUe». No imporUnt tomporaturo c*iaa«o* EAST AND SOITH CENTRAL TEX.AS» Partly cloudy throufh Monday wtU* few ttaundorahowors. moatlv aouth. No impor*-ant loniporaiuro ckanaoa TEMPERATI BES Sal AM.    *•« 7«    I»    « 77    *:»    ■    •» 75    J» ......... »* 74  ........ 4:» .......... - « I 74    , .......... 5»      «    ! 75    ..  ........ 7 » .........    Si    i 7*    ............ S3»  .......... S4 tS --    -    S:»      « S5 ..... IS    »      t as    n    la as    IX    >•    i Hiih and low tcmpersturto tor T4 houri oadnd at 4 >0; *4 and TJ.    1 HtSh and low tenipcraturM aamo dato laat yonr: 7t and SS Sunrta* laat nlglK 7;S6 p.m Sunrino f-diay S;17 a.m. Sunacl toniaht S:5S p m. Barom.-icr madtnf al » 50 p.m. SS.aS. Relativa hnoudity nt S:M p.m. SS<%. By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Texas Labor Day violent death toll reached six Saturday night, four ia traffic. Sarah Owens, 36, was fatally shot at her home two miles southwest of Longview. An airman Rationed at Perrin Air Force Base. Grayson County, was killed Satunky when the car he was riding in overturned near Denison He was Billie Leon Childs, 26. Clarence Hoffart. Mi. Houston, was killed Friday night when his car overturned north of Beaumont. A pedestrian at Dallas, .Arcadio Gonvez, 49. was killed Friday night by a car as he crossed a street. The driver was held for invesuga-Uon of negligent homicide. Louis Gutierrez. 29, San Antonio Cannery worker, w as shot to death Friday night in a tavern fight. ON SAM BEAM, JR., FARM Reporter-News Presents First Soil Doy Tuesday ffiniKii rm way to soil day iin Rj HOB COOKE Rrporter-News Farm Editor The Reporter - News will present it.s first annual Soil Day Tuesday on the Sam Beam Jr.. farm north of Potosí Cooperating with the newspaper In presenting a program designed to place emphasis on «oil. water, and plant coiLservation are nine implement dealers of Abilene, personnel of the Stiil Conservation Service and other finiis The pixigraiii begins at f am at the Midwa>’, where all exhibits of the coojieraling dealers will be s^ up K.d N Wishcaiuper, managing editor of the Reporter • News and the day’s master of ceremonie«, will explain the aims and purjHwes of the Soil Day program J. B Harlan. Abilene work unit consenationiat of the St'S, will outline the consei\alion problems and define hrieñy the proi'osed atepe ef tk.e day’s program to study these probleim Terrace Baildlag Flmi Terrace building will begin at t H) a m. with five equipment ftrnxa luppb t^ the machines and ofteratora tii eonstrwtio« el the terrace« Cooperating la this will Mere SeU Day Stertea Appear la SeetkM B be Farm Equipment Co., Central Texas Machinery, Bible Hardware A Equipment, ChUdreas Tractor, and Plains Machiner>' At 10 a m. technicians of SCS, assisted by F. M. Churx'hlll. head of the ACC agriculture department, and Keith Justice of the same department, will conduct demonstrations emphasizmg soil needs, introduced grasses, summer and winter legumes, range cover and management. Theae dMDonstrations are to be repeated at SO minute intervals during th# morning. 'The aitemouA program wilt begin at ! p m. Speech at Hit P. M. Only speei'h on the day’s events is slated at 1 15 pm when Paul H WaUter, Temple, dejHity stalt con.servatiouiat, wilt make • brief ad*lre«i at the Midway. The afternoon wiR be devoted to demonftratifina with various kinds of plows ui tluhble mukhlni, »bb-soiling, ehtseling. awesp plowing and Ukrrace maintenanoe la ad-dttlea Iba aqutpmeot daalare MU- ed, others using tlieu- equipment in this work will be Antilley-San-ders, Thomton’i Department Store. Shaddix Implement. and .\bilene Farm Implement Co A demonstration with a Hancock elevating scraper and the inoculating and planting of winter peas will be features of the afternoon. Food and cold drinks at the Midway will be supplied by the Hamby and Tuscola home demonstration clubs Tlie Abilene Chamber of C*mimerce will be in charge of a booth where there will: be plenty of free ice water. The Miiklle Clear Fork S*iil! Conservation District officials will man the headquarters booth w here tome conservation displays will be exhibited Dtlier firms c*x»peraling include Cttixens National Bank. First Slate Bank. Fanners and Me^ chant* National Bank, Phillips Petroleum C«., with Leon Reeae and Dub Prttchelt in charge. Western Cottonoil. Tayior Electric Co-(H‘. Abilene ChrUtian College, Fraley A Co., Montgonvery - Ward A Ce.. Buddv f'We*! Store, and PWl laird’a AGRO FefUiiaer Co. el VaMI Ira Boy Slain Accidentally SNYDER. Sept. 4 (R.NS-Charlie Dean Loper. 9. was fatally shot about 2:40 p.m. Saturday in a firearms accident while playing at a neighbor’s house near his parents’ home in Ira Charlie Dean was killed when a .22 calibre rifle discharged after it had been stood upright in a corner by his ll-year-old brother, Elvin Myrel Loper. Charlie Dean was the son of Mr. and Mrs. William R. Loper Sr, of Ira. After the shooting the yougsler was taken to Cogdell Memorial Hospital here. He was pronounced dead on arrival. Survivor* include the parents, three sisters. Sherry Kay. Barbara. and Mrs. Wanda June Merritt. and five brothers. Elvin Myrel Jesse Joel, William Robert, William R. Jr. and Lonnie Loper, all of Ira. Funeral will be al 2 p m Monday at the First Baptist Church in Ira The Rev. C. J, Smith, pastor of the Knapp Baptist Church, will (rfficiate, assisted by the Rev. Richard L. Johnson, pastor of the Ira Baptist Churv'h. Burial in Ri«e Hill Cemetery at Merkel will be directed by Bell Funeral Home. Wage Hike SelHes Fiiedone SIrike 4 «fv-A ClJSVEl^ND. Sept three-week atrike of M.OtW Firestone Tire A Ruhher Co. worker* was settled tonight with a new ctmtraci granting the 64-cent pay increase pattern set ui the rubber izidustr> A jvnnt statement by the com paay and unkn aaid the aettle-ment previdea “a new working agreement." to addition to the pay tocreaae. Terms of tho working agreement were not cttactoeed and a Fire«tone effteial aaki there would be no aiittlnil iaiAlto InoifhL United States from its Eu-_ ronean allies and in the condition of w'eakness thus created to extend Communist nower through Germany and France. Last Monday the French Assembly killed off the EDC under which West Germany would have been rearmed, with its forces becoming part of a six-nation defense system. Although American leaders are confident that ways will be found to give West Germany sovereignty and organize a German army in a year or so it is now clear that the EDC defeat dealt a staggering blow to the unity of the Western powers. The formerly close cooperation' of the United States, Britain and France, which have formed the hard core of resistance to Red aggression, was badly damaged in midsummer by the United States split with Britain and France over the Indochina peace negotiations at Geneva. In addition there is a j steadily widening rift between j Washington and London over the whole question of relations with the Commiukist bloc and particularly with Red china. Edea Absent Allied Gxnfusion Stimulates Move WASHINGTON, Sept. 4 iiP)—Russia is expected to make a new move soon to promote its all-European “security* plan, taking advantage of Allied confusion resulting from i the defeat of the European Defense Community. ! Officials agreed today that the stage is almost ideally set for a fresh Soviet maneuver. However, they expressed hope that a pending American - British - French note to Moscow on the Soviet proposition may blunt whatever thrust the Reds have in mind. The basic aim of Moscow strategy has been to defeat the EDC, to paralyze or destrov the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, to isolate ^he U.S. Vessels Cruise Near Quemoy Island WASHINGTON. Sept 4 yB-Hie Defense Department, apparently seeking to keep the Red Chinese guessing, said cryptically today it is “alert” to its responsibilities in the area of Quemoy Island and ha* “certain fleet units” at sea. Quemoy has been undo- bombardment by Chinese Communists for two days. The remaiks were made at • news ccHifesrence held by Asst. Secretary Defense Fred A. Seatim. But in response to further questions he said be was “not aware of any specific orders” to the U. 8. 7th Fleet to go to the aid of Na-tionalist-heki Quemoy, juet off the Red mtonland. Raises QaestiaM This left up to the ato;^ big I question: Would the sbriltog ef ttie island, which has resulted to the dMith The decision of British Foreign of two U. S. officer*, leed to a -    ■      90^ Secretary F^ao not to eo to the Manila conference on Southeast Asian security. op«iing tomorrow, was made against the urgings of Secretary State Dulles, who is attending, and was a disappointment to the State Department. Now both Washington and London give every evidence of being full of worry and distress itoout the future attitude and policies of France. IhiUes has announced a reappraisal of American policies toward Europe. London is maneu-veruig to stave off French demands that Britain assume new responsibilities in Europe. clato between Red forces those of the United State*? The answer could depend in part on what further action the Red* take, if any, to follow up the bombardment In some quarters, it was believed the gunfire was not a prelude to any outward thrust by the Communists but was designed primarily as a feeling out process and perhiq)« m an effort to sow disharmony to the Southeast Asia defense conference opening to Manila Monday. Prwident Eisenhower ha* warned that if the Red* tried te See ALERT, Pf. f-A. CeL • REP. MAHON HOME 'Flexible Props Big GOP Error' LUBBOCK. Sept    4—The    new flexible support farm program is the Republican administration’s greatest mistake to date, Con-gresMiian George Mahon said here; Saturday.    i Mahon has returned to Lubbock i following the adjournment of Congress Saturday he oivened his office in the Post Office Building, where he commented to reporters on the major problems of foreign relations, the domestic front, taxation and the farm pro-, gram,    j Although he does not always agree with President Eisenh*>wer. he believes Eisenhower is doing his best to provide the country with able and honest leadership and thinks the country should continue to support the President in his foreign policy efforts Mahiin will speak Wecinesday noon al a s«mI conservation meet-, tog at Levelland. Saturday he will j intrvxluce Assist.mt Secretary of State Thruslon Morton at Sudan s annual I'nited Nations Fertival. Te laimesa FlesU He will be a guest St*{q 1« at laime>a’s third annual Fie.sla and will attend the Loraine homecoming Sept 25^21 The ciingrcssman said some re REP. GEORGE MAHON . . . iMieki Ike’s fereig* peUey eat mistake to date, and I vt^xr-oualy oppoaed It, feeling that the 90 per cent program was to the interest of both the farmer and the people generally.” •Farmer Badly Hart’ Mahon 5aid the fanner will be I badlv hurt and there will be at lution to the |«oblem oi cnto 8W- ably inevitable, but momentum was given the declining uicome M the farmer by the determined fight oi the aiimlnistratioii in behalf ot the flexible. siMalled sliding scale, suitoort program “The aiiministrauon has won its fight for the sliding scale prin ciple and broken the bai* of the 90 per cent of parity »upporl program The Republican* appear to feel that the new flexible support program is their greateet accom-pliihment i* two year*. “la m    R to Itotor gr«M- plu.iies. Moreover, he said, control «I crop plantings will not he reduced. On the contrary, he believe* crop ctmirob m 19M will probably he more rigid than at any ttoie to the laat 19 years. la commenung on the world pie-ture, Mahon taid it to far tmm bright ‘The Ctiinmunist* eenttoM* te Bee MAttON, Pg- i-A. CiL M ;

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