Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 30, 1954 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - August 30, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               HOT Abilene Reporter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR- WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Byron VOL. LXXIV, NO. 75 AaocitUfd Pnm (AP) ABILENE, TEXAS, MONDAY EVENING, AUGUST 30, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS PRICE DAILY 5c, SUNDAY lOc AIR BASE for the Abilene Air Force Base Chapel are reaching up- in nnrtTi rvni-Hjin n-T 4Ho tir__tt. ward in the north central portion of the base. Quisle Construction Co. of Fort Worth began construction on June 14. and expects to complete work in November .'Staff photo by Don Hutcheson) ;fH i Second Air Base Job Hears Completion; Million Spent anron will By WARREN' BITIKETT Previously completed was the three more major projects Completion of the second major Avgas and jet fuel storage-byj Bids on contract at Abilene Air Force Base ,'Gerald Mora Construction Co. I 7,   ing for dismissal of tne charges. Upressed the opinion Sat the ac- No rulmg was given immeaiate-1 is a traitor." u, f n Mrs- L- Batchelor. Hermit, Attorneys for Uie 22-year-old sol-1 mothcr of accused and Mrs' dicr from Kermit, Tex., asked for PorUa Howe of Malden 'MJ J JJ the dissmisal on several grounds. Lach pther ta lhe Mrs including the clam, that no thor-jHowe is the mother of Richard cugh and impartial investigation Teitneson, one of the 21 Americans of charges bad been made and that who repatriation from the charges were vague and the dc-! Communists in North Korea .endant was unable to understand I Batchelor. 22. of Kermit Tex is some of them. j chargcd The motion came after a mem-i the enemy and informing'on his ber of the general court-martial buddies during his 31 as a trying Batchelor asked to be ex-1 prisoner of war in North Korea cused on the grounds he believed) He was one of 23 American pris- Batcnclor. was a traitor. He was oners who decided to stay with the excused. j Ccmmunisls after the Korean ar- Thc trial opened in a sheet-metal! mistice. But he changed his mind building at Ft. Sam Houston. and came back to the Allied side Batchelor came into (he room I last Jan. 1. i are to be opened Sept 15. They underway on are similar in construction to the seven dormitories and two admin- istration-mess buildings, now un- der construction by A. J. Rife Con- struction Co. at a contract cost! of August's progress report for I Abilene Air Force Base was re-j leased this week. Third contract nearest comple-l tion is the Doerfler Construction j Co. work on the sanitary sewer! system. Work on the sewers is 87 i per cent completed. Following are other jobs in prog- ress and their status: Runway, apron and Texas Bitulithic Co., 77.5 per cent Republican party doesn't amount to anything in Texas." Sewed Up With the victory, it was felt cer- tain Shivers sewed up continued conservative control of state party machinery and would be in the saddle at the Sept. 14 State Dem- ocratic Convention. The convention will control Texas' delegation to the 1956 Democratic National Con- vention. Recruiting Station Moved The only other American of the 23 who came back was Cpl. Ed- ward S. Dickenson of Big Stone Gap. Va. He was convicted by a court martial last May 4 on charges similar to (hose brought against Batchclor. THE WEATHER smiling. He told a reporter. "I'm xlari to get it over with." He was in the uniform he wore as a mem- ber of the 1st Cavalry Division and looked sturdier than he did when he left the Far East earlier this year. One of his attorneys said in an interview he would claim that the Army "promised Batchclor immu- nity and then went hack on its promise." j The attorney. Joel Westbrook ofj San Antonio, said Batchelor imtnt euser to clear himself with the American people. SO As the trial opened, a member ol the general tlie jury in a military asked to be excused from service on the grounds he Iwlicvert "the accused is a traitor." He was Isl 1.1. Edward li. Schowaltcr Jr., stationed at Ft. Sam Houston, whose home is Metairle, Iji. Ho was excused. The trial judge hod nsked if any- one wi.uld chnllcngc the right of nny man lo serve the court rinrlinl bonrtt. .Schownllcr. H lull, lui.sky man, (rose from his place unit said: f. S. DEPARTMENT OF TOMJIKSCK WEATHER !U'RE.u: AH1I.K.NK AND VICINITY Vnrtly IBTH CF.NTRAI, ami WEST TEXAS- SOUTH TEXAS Clfsr 10 partly cloudy throucti Twfsday. TKMFEK Sim. P.M. s Mon. A.M. R3 90 I3..J0 hj Snntrl InM nleht p.m. SnnTIM- Itxlty :13 A.m. tnnlgM p.m. lurnmrlcr rrnillnl: At ISjM p.m. RrtHtlvf ritimMlty p.m. 3i hflura IIIK nt w.ni.l Minimum UK m n.ni.i.71. r tor 2 lor il kmri nil. to completed. Dorms: -10 Per Cent Seven men's .dormitories and two mess and administration E. McKee Construc- j tion Co.. 40.5 per cent completed. Water and gas Con- struction Co.. 79.7 per cent com- pleted. Primary B. Zachry Co.. 57.1 per cent complete. General purpose warehouse- Robert E. McKee Co., 13.9 per cent completed. Hospital and hospital heating .7 per cent. Grid duct Elec- tric Co., 54.3 per cent. Base Construc- tion Co., 23.4 per cent completed Hydrant refueling kin Construction Co., 6.7 per cent complete. ground storage lAifkin. 2 per cent completed. i BOQ's Two bachelor's officers quarters Construction Co., 2.7 per cent complete. Maintenance Con- struction Co., 6.6 per cent com- pleted. Transmitter and Receiver build- 12.5 per cent. Motor pool 6.2 per cent complete. Crash and structural (ire sta- to former Guber- natorial Candidate J. J. Holmes ot Austin, 6.J per cent complete. Two Jobs arc pending. One is the awarding of the communica- tions building contract. A. J. Rife is the apparent low bidder with The other Is the order from the Corps ot Engineers tor H. B. Zschry to begin work on tho runway lighting system. He has the contract for but no Abilene Army Recruiting anc Induction Main Station opened Monday morning in its new loca- tion, the old post office building on Third SL Also in the new location for the first time Monday morning was the Abilene Armed Forces Exam- ining Station. That establishment gives physical and mental exam- inations for prospective entrants into all branches of the military. The two groups occupy the sec- ond and third'floors of the old post office. Both of the organizations have heretofore operated in a city- owned building at North First and Cedar Sts. Capt. Don Stewart is command- er officer of both. Still in the North First and Ce- dar Sts. location are the Army recruiting sub-station for Abilene proper, and the Abilene Air Force Recruiting Detachment. The sub-station expects eventually to move to the old post office building. Abilene Air Force Recruiting De- tachment will move out of the North First and Cedar building. No announcement has been made as to where it will go. Maj. Julien LeBlanc Is its commander. Fifty West Texas counties are covered by the Army and Air Force recruiting and induction headquarters here. WHAT'S NEWS ON INSIDE PAGES state represen- tatives lost In Saturday's primary. Page 3-A. IUP6ET to spend Ins thii vwr than lost, Poge 1-B. Editorial answers Yarborough's charges, against the press. Pooe 2-B. Monday in connection with an alleged burglary and a check forging and passing spree. Delbert Eugene Davis, 18, of Candyland Courts. Abilene and Thomas Don Benthall, 18, Boute 1, Hawley. each were charged vrith burglary and with forgery and passing. By mid morning Monday city police had verified that 20 checks forged on the McAiister Trucking Co., had been passed at- local business establishments. The youths, when qestioned by Detective Lt. George Sntton late Saturday had stated that they forged 20 checks on the trucking company. They gave Sutton the list of the places where they said they passed them Each check was for In every place the boys report- edly purchased a small amount of merchandise, receiving the change in cash. in Possession Vilisn arrested by Sutton. they had in their possession The youths said in written state- ments to Sution that the money was from the cashing ot the forg- checks. They stated that last Friday night they broke into the Pender Co.. where Davis said he was employed, and stole a check-writer with which to put the amount on the checks. Detective Sutton said the boys also had about 50 more similar checks on the trucking company in their possession when The charges were filed with Justice of the Peace H. F. Long. They will be considered by the 42nd District Court grand "jurv. which meets Sept 7. Long set bond of S1.500 for each boy on the burglary charges. Still In Jail The suspects remained in city jail Monday morning. Places which cashed the checks were: Army Surplus Store, Thornton's (South 12th and But- ternut Thornton's Depart- ment Store (South Fourth and Oak Piggly Wiggly Store (North luth and Pine Lintz Depart- ment Store, J. C. Penney Co.. Sears, Roebuck t Co.. The Pop- ular Store. Mack Eplen's Ca'fe- teria. Grant's, McLcmore Raj- Drug Store, M-System. Store 'South 33th and Butternut Vt-System (North Eighth and Or- hange Store (North j Eighth and Hickory Leon-' ard's Department Store, Hutchin- son's Food Town Market, Spec Burns Tire Co.. Safeway Store (North, 12th and Pine Safe- way Store (810 Butternut and F. W. Woolworth Co. Found la Trash Davis stated thot "about a week ago" he found a bunch of McAlis- er Trucking Co. unsigned checks n a trash can behind the Pender Co.. where he was employed. He said he removed them from he can and took them to his apartment, snd wrote in the name 'Eddie Earl Person" as the payee and wrote the date Aug. 27, 1954. Davis said that Friday night Davis said. Practically all the merchandise that the boys purchased was re- covered when they were arrested, Sutton reported. Two License Number! L. Goldblatt, owner of the Armv Surplus Store, furnished the tip about 4 p. m. Saturday that led to the boys' arrest. After giving them change on one of the checks, Goldblatt noted that the automo- bile in which they were traveling bore two' different license num- bers, front and back. He then checked, .-with. McAiister Trucking 'Co.. and learned the check was forged. Goldblatt phoned police, giving them a description of the boys, their car and the two license numbers. The information was given on the police radio to all city police cars, the Sheriffs Department and Texas Highway Patrol. About p. m. Saturday De- tective Sutton, driving east on South 14th St., saw the wanted vehicle coming south on Poplar SL He pulled over and waited un- til it went on south down Poplar SL past 14th, and then quickly overtook it. Revision Parley PARIS French National Assembly today interrupted debate on the European Army Treaty after one of its supporters in- sisted on an immediate call for new negotiations to change the treaty. This move by the group in favor of the European Defense Commu- nity Pact immediately brought a counter move by the opponents to shut off the debate and bury EDC without further talk. The morning session of the As sembly was devoted exclusively to the questions of procedure. None of the approximately 60 orators wanting to talk about the treaty itself had a chance to speak. Under parliamentary rules, a de- cision on these motions must take precedence over the rest of. the debate. A truce was reached yes- terday and both supporters and ad- herents of EDC agreed to with- draw their opposing motions to permit the general talks to pro- ceed. This morning, the pro-EDC group had a change of heart and the resolution calling for new talks with the other five EDC nations was reinstated. So was the anti- EDC motion. Both Working Parliamentary experts were try- ing to figure out a solution. Both factions, were working to line np votes for their side. The motion submitted by Alfred Chupin of the small UnionTot Dem- ocratic and says that there is reason "to in- vite the government to follow up its efforts, prior to the vote on the treaty, for an agreement among the signing nations on the basis oi the project of protocol submitted by France at Brussels and to re- new with Germany the negotiations of the Saar." It proposed resum- ing the debate Sept. 21. Opening the'treaty debate yester- day, Mendes-France maintained his on-the-fence attitude regarding the European Defense Community Pact but he choked off several at- tempts to stall discussion and cleared the way for the pro-EDC faction to have its say. Former Premier Rene Mayer was the first to accept the chal- lenge with an urgent plea for adop- tion of the treaty. With 69 more speakers to be heard from, .the de- ABILENIAN'S FATHER SLAIN Officer Fatally Shot Near Tahoka LUBBOCK Lynn Counts- deputy sheriff was shot to death late yesterday at Wilson and short- ly afterwards a Negro who fled in the officer's car was found slain in a farm field 12 miles from Tahoka. The dead were: William Francis Henderson, 52, the deputy. He is the father of an Abilene woman. R. C. Stansberry. 27, of Tahoka. Henderson had stopped a car in which five Negroes were riding. Officers said Stansberry got out of the car, a scuffle resulted and the JJegro took Henderson's gun and shot him. Investigators said the Negro also used the deputy's gun to shoot him- self in the head less than an hour later. Lynn Count'-- is just south of Lubbock. Mrs. William F. Morrison, of 4178 Russell Ave., Abilene, is a daughter of Deputy Henderson. She and her husband, a geo- physicist for Stanolind Oil 'and Gas. left Abilene Sunday night for Wilson, after learning of the trag- edy. bate is expected to last at least until Wednesday- There appeared some chance that before voting to ratify or re- ject the treaty, the Assembly would ask Mendes-France to seek new concessions from the other Eve prospective members of the alliance Italy, West Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Lux- embourg; Mendes-Franee failed to get the changes he wanted in his talks with the other five foreign ministers at Brussels earlier this mouth. In his three-hour speech yester- day he still refused to take a stand for or against the treaty. But he warned that West Germany cannot be denied sovereignty much longer. He said that if the EDC treaty is defeated, he will call the As- sembly back to ratify the Bonn Accord, the companion pact to give the Germans virtually full control of their own affairs. Bell Workers Get Pay Hikes In New Pact ST. LOUIS' w-TAe Southwest- ern Bell Telephone Co. signed a Dew contract today with the CIO Communications Workers, cover- ing employes in six states, after an all-night negotiating, ses- sion; The contract for one year gave wage .increases ranging from ?1 to p.50 a week. The present wage scale .ranges from to a week. The settlement was reached in a closing negotiating session which began at 10 a.m. yesterday and continued through the night, lasting nearly 24 hours. The con- tract runs to midnight Aug. 29, 1955. Although the old contract ex- pired at midnight, both sides had agreed to continue it until one party or the other gave notice of tarminating it Neither side had done, that Employes in 14 towns were awarded higher wages by reclas- siftcation of the towns in a higher salary brackets. Some changes were also made in working condi- tions and a few job titles were changed under the new- contract The towns reclassified included Christi. Big .Spring, Mona- lans and Plainview in Texas, and Sand Springs, Okla. A company spokesman said it las not been determined whether the wage raise will require an in- crease in some customer rates. COLLEGE STUDENTS... The Reporter-News has a special for you 9 months ly mail only, to any address in he U.S., Morning Sunday or Evening and Sunday. To order dial 4-7271 Abi. ene, or see your local carrier. Benthall was at his apartment, and that Benthall wrote the name 'R. A. Roberts" at Uie bottom of the company checks. Then the two boys, Davis said, went to Pewter Co., burglamed it breaking out a back window. They took the check writing ma- chine to Davis' apartment, he tnid, and used It to wrlito the amount on each check. Then Ihoy went to Fender Co. and re- McCarthy Won't Call Any Witnesses in New Hearing WASHINGTON McCar- 1 speaking tour, and for investiga- thy said today he will call I can't plan anything. no defense witnesses in the Sen- ate's new investigation of his con- duct which will start here tomor- row. Flying in from Los Angeles foi- the new inquiry, and to learn the verdict seven fellow senators have reached in the McCarthy-Army hearings, McCarthy said he is ready to testify in his own behalf in the new inquiry, if he is re- quested to (to so. But he indicated no desire to tes- tify. His hope, he told a reporter, U for a quick windup of the inquiry, which he termed "a great waste of time." 'I will cooperate to get tbii thing out of the way as quickly possible." said in an interview. "H up my plans tor in active Republican campaigi "It is a great waste of time through no fault of the committee. Once the charges were made thev have to be resolved, and that is task of this committee and the senate." McCarthy said that "some of the things alleged "by the three sena- tors who precipitated the new in- quiry "will be admitted." "For he said, "the fact I said Sen. Flanders (spear- head of the new move to have him censured by the Senate) was sen- ill! is uixiueitioMd. It will free- ly admitted. He can prove he's not if he can and wants to." Asked how many witnwaej be plans to call fat the inquiry McCar- thy said: "I have none to call. If they uMiit me to appear 1 will. "I will, tt courtt, attend sions." Flying back from Los Angeles to attead the inquiry, McCarthy told a reporter he sees no, reason why the new investigation should be a long one. A special bipartisan committee headed by Sen. Watkins (R-Utan) planned a closed-door meeting later in the day to complete plans for the scheduled start tomorrow of public hearings on a resolution to censure McCarthy for what Sen. Flanders (R-Vt) has charged'was conduct "unbecoming a senator" and tending to bring "disrepute" on the Senate. Cn another front, the three Democratic of the Sen- ate subcommittee sought to complete S p.m. deadline their minority report on the 38-day McCarthy-Army hear- which wxM UU Juot If.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication