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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: July 30, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 30, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               1- 3 COOLER FINAL "WITHQUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL. LXX1V, NO. 42 (AT) ABILENE, TEXAS, FRIDAY EVENING, JULY 30, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS PRICK DAILY Sc, SU1TOAY 3 More Charges Filed Against Cpl. Batchelor SAN ANTONIO more -charges were: filed by the Army today a g a i n s t Cpl. Claude L. Batchelor, the young Texan who elected, to stay with his commu- nist captors in Korea and then changed his mind. Batcheior, 22, of Kermit, Tex., is in 4th Army custody awaiting a court martial on charges of giv- ing aid and comfort to the enemy while a prisoner of war. Informing Charged The 4th Army headquarters said two of the new charges accuse Batchelor of informing on other prisoners-of war in North Korea. Batchelor always has maintained that in the North Korean prisori, he was known as a "progressive who didn't squeal on his buddies." The third charge accused Batch- elor of taking part in a trial in a prisoner of war camp. Tie pris- oner in question was reported be- ing tried by "progressives" in the camp. Batchelor faces trial in San An- tonio next month. Until today, he has been accused only of making speeches in which he tried to convert American sol- diers to Communism, writing ar- ticles to make prisoners accept en- emy propaganda and writing let- ters which the Army said ex- pressed disloyalty. Statement Lt. Dillard Barrera. 4th Army information officer, told of the new charges. He said two of the counts resulted from sworn statements made by former prisoners. Bar- rera said these men accused Batchelor of informing the Chinese Reds of activities of other prison- ers and that this resulted in pun- ishment. An Army court martial has con- victed another prisoner. Cpl. 'Ed- ward Dickenson of Virginia, of charges of collaborating with the Chinese Reds while a prisoner. Both Parties Profit on Tax Bill CLAUDE BATCHELOR. set month COMMISSION OFFERS HELP Water Well Near City Polluted City Commission heard Friday, that residents of an area just east of Carver Addition use well water "unfit for drinking." Abilene-Taylor County Health Unit filed a written report. It said residents of houses built by B. J. Crow are using "heavily contami- nated" water from a well pro- vided by Crow. The houses are outside the city limits; Yet commission members Friday said they regard the situ- ation as a health menace to Abi- lene, They pointed to the danger of .typhoid. Commissioners planned to con- tact Crow or others associated with Y Okays Handball Courts, Health Club i "The YMCA board unanimously authorized the con- operation of a Health Club and handball courts at a spe- cial called session at 4 p.m. Thurs- day. A committee was appointed by Evalyn Fields, president of tha board, to meet with the Health X-RaysSoar; Deadline Near Business was picking up a little at the-State Health Department X-ray unit on the ground floor if Thornton's. Saturday will; be last day for the free unit here. The unit chalked up its best rec- ord Thursday when 775 people filed past to have chest X-rays made. It: was the first day the unit had had a waiting line during its three-weeks :Stay here, Technician Joe Cabazos said. As of 11 a-m. Friday, 200 peo- ple had come in. This looked fair to set a record of over 800, Caboz- os predicted. So far, X-rays, have been taken by the unit, about less than last year's final total. The chest X-rays are free and are helpful in detecting such lung troubles as tuberculosis and can- cer in their early stages. County Officials Visit Waco Fair Taylor. Comity's judge and com- missioners are seeing how Waco's fairground facilities compare with Abilene's. Judge Reed and Com- missioners Floyd Tate of Buf- falo Gap, J. T. McMfllon of Lawn, Rufe Tittle of Merkel am Claude Newberry of Abilene lefl Friday morning for Waco. They will inspect the buildings there, and discuss with McLennan County officials the development of their' program. Completely new facilities have been recently com pleted there in the northwest sec tion of the.city. Club committee to make the final pproyal on the construction and iher "details. A motion to appoint the com- mittee was made by Alex Bickley. he committee was given author- y to expand present, facilities to ccommodate the Health Club as ong as it does not interfere with he youth prcf ram at the YMCA. To Meet Tuesday A special committee will meet Vesday at the YMCA building 1th contractors and architects to pprove final plans for construe- idh'of the Health Club and one o three handball courts.' "The Health Club, a national ranch of the YMCA, is to the fMCA what a service .club is to he Earl Hardt, exe- utive secretary, explained. Hardt, who has worked with youth for approximately W year's, aid the Health Club will be one f the greatest steps yet made for the YMCA and the community. Cost of membership is year and is open to businessmen if Abilene. The executive committee of the club reported that 85 member- hips have been sold and a few idditional memberships would be required in order for handball courts to be included. Goal Raised to 130 The committee had an origina goal of .100 members in the club jut that has been increased to 130. It is-expected Shat the Health Club will add fnra to MO worth of equipment each year rhich will be available to the club and Y members. Club membership will entitle each member to a massage twice weekly, access to'steam cabinets wat cabinets, ultra-violet and hea amps, as well as other exercisi equipment. WHAT'S NEWS ON INSIDE PAGES WATK KMt MEliKEU-City op- proves 31-year wafer contract with okays pavina. and onrwxotion. Pose QUIINS TONIGHT Touring for of the West- TixQt-New. Mexico League visit Sox Stadium tonight. from HardirwSiiTHnoru University and MeMuny wmnur bond i schooh 7-A. im. The city tentatively plans to ler to extend an existing water upply line a short distance to a just east of Lytle' Creek, if le developers will run laterals to erye the houses.' Dr.'Hugh J. health :unit irector, wrote the.report on row's well. He stated, in part, in July 26: "A water-sample was collected s Mr. Crow's well last, .week hich showed the water to be eavily contaminated and unfit for rinking purposes. The occupants et'the water at the well." Stennis.'. letter said there are half -a- dozen or -so small resi- ences'invo.lved." It called attention, also, to si- lilar conditions found in 1952 and )53! in Carver Addition, which is [so outside the city.. That addi- on is Just: west of the Crow ouses. The city has run water lines into Carver Addition, to provide esidents with a safe drinking upply "A series of water samples were tested in 1932 and agiain in 933 from wells in the Carver Ad- Stennis wrote "These .veils are all- very rang- ing from 10 to 15 feet'in depth, ince this area is not sewered, lost of the residences have in- :alled pit type privies: Many ol are less feet from: the wells..' 'As.was expected, these wells shewed heavy contamination, and cases actual fecal pollu ion was determined. The water rom-these wells was-used- for general domestic purposes..Many amilies used it for drinking. No rater samples have been collect- ed from these wells since city water has been made available D this addition." Crow Addition and the Car- Addition have no relation to me another, except that they are o'cated close together. Crow wasn't involved in connection with he Carver wells. THE WEATHER U.S. DEPAETMEVT OF COMMERCE WEATHER BtjmEAU ABILENE AND Fair today tonight, and Saturday. Cookr RrMay after noon. High temperature today 90-93; ton tonight 75 degrees. High Saturday aroawl OKra5CENTHAL cloudiness with showers occasional rain' tonight and Saturday and in and ctntral portions this afternoon. WEST TEXAS Partly cloudy trilh widely scattered mostly afternoon and even ing ihowers Friday afternoon, night and Saturday, except occasional rain extrem east portion and South Plains tonight an '_ Considerable cfoudlnes. with shower.? and occasional rain this after noon and nxwtly In north and central pot iKHU tor.inht. Saterdfcy partly cloudy, wnl scattered Uinnderaliowers. A Ilrtlc warmer SSOirrH CENTRAL TEXAS-Partly cfeudy with widely scattered mofUy afternoon evMfef afternoon, tonlfht Saturday. occasional rata, 4.-30 :-aa. HW M Probe Favored Over Censure Of McCarthy WASHINGTON av-Sen. H. Alex- ander Smith (R-NJ) today quoted Vice President Nixon as saying Smith is "on the right track" with a proposal to investigate Sen. Mc- Carthy (R-Wis) as a substitute for a move to censure McCarthy. Smith told reporters that if Ms substitute is defeated, however, "I would feel compelled" to vote for a resolution by Sen. Flanders (R- Vt) proposing to "condemn" Mc- Carthy's Red-hunting tactics as chairman of the Senate Investiga- jons subcommittee. Special Cemmittee As a substitute for the Flanders resolution, Smith has proposed that the Senate create a special com- mittee, headed by Nixon, to invest- igate "the alleged good or evil of so-called McCarthyism." The com- mittee would report to the Senate early next year. 'Smith said he discussed the plan with Nixon this morning and "the Vice President thinks I'm on the right track." "I asked Nixon, 'didj embarrass 'He said 'not a bit'." Smith said stoe senators have told him they would not support his substitute because it. looked like "ducking the regarded as politically "explosive. Not "I'm he con- tinued. "If my resolution is de- feated, I'm going to vote for the Flanders resolution." He said he would feel "com- pelled" to' do so. I've been compelled, much to my regret, to criticize Joe Mc- Smith said. "I have urged him to work with the administra- tion but he .never seems to." Smith said several senators want to make it clear that "they are waiting to he counted" on the Mc- Carthy issue, Sherman Hospital Bond Issue Fails SHERMAN (H-Sherman voters turned down a bond issue yesterday. If the proposal had car ried the money would have been used toward purchase and opera tion of St. Vincent's Hospital and for the expansion and improve- ment of Wilson N. Jones Hospital L.B.Powell, Planing Mill Owner, Dies; Rites Saturday L. B; Powell, 69, died Friday nVorning in his residence at 1902 Walnut-St; He was. the owner, with his son, of the Powell Planing Mill at 902 North Seventh. Powell had been in-poor health 'or some time, and seriously ill for the past two weeks. He came to Abilene in 1921 as carpenter.. :From :1928 to 1333, Mr. Powell was wo'rking with the Service Planing Mill. He then returned to carpentry work until 1938 when he and his son, William Powell of -557 EN. 18th St., bought put the Powell Planing Mill. The ori- ginal owner was no Mr. Powell was born in Jasper Ciiihty, Tex., -4, 1884. He aid Siss.Ollie Moore of Waco were wed there in lived in Jasper Ceaaty until moving ti Abilene. He was a member of St. Pau Methodist Church. Survivors include his wife; one daughter, Mrs. 1. M. Baltes o San Antonio; his son; two broth ers, P. H. Powell, of WoodviU and Dr. W. R. Powell of Laredo and three sisters, Mrs. .James H Roark and Mrs. H. B. Zachary of San Antonio, and Mrs. Wesle Cudd of Ontario, Ore.; and four grandchildren. Funeral will be held at 10 a.m Saturday in Kiker Warren Cha pel. Dr. E. D. Landreth of St Paul will officiate. Burial will be to Eimwood Memorial Park. Pallbearers will be W. T. Aus tin, J. B. Lewis, Bob Dent, R. L Vicars; Ben Barnes, and Roy Boa right of .Abilene.'. STEAM CATAPULT Cutlass jet fighter, nose high and.with its tail almost scraping the deck, leaves a steam catapult during a test at the Philadelphia Naval Base. The new plane-launching device is being installed aboard aircraft is hoped that steam catapults will reduce danger of accidents such as occurred on the Carrier Bennington earlier this year.___________________________________________ Yorborough Accuses Shivers Of Stirring Up 'Hate War' By MAC ROY RASOR Asioclated Freu Staff Gov. Allan Shivers and Ralph Yarborough were both confidently the verge of kicking off what promised o be a bitter run-off battle for Texas' governorship. Both have held meetings of tan- key campaign workers and -both nave held press conferences giving their analysis of first primary re- Speed Cited On Anson Road Old Arison Rd. remains "a despite recent city an- City Commissioner W. D. Rich'said Friday. He gave that report to the com- mission. who lives on that asked that speed- limit .signs be erected. He suggested a traffic jignal light at the intersection of Ambler Ave. and Old Anson Rd. City .Manager Austin P. Han- cock promised to check into the situation. He implied, the control devices will be, erected. Recently the commission annex- ed Old AnsonHd. to Abilene, from Ambler Ave. to Anson Ave. Control of'speeders was given as the.main reason for annexing the street. A measure suggested by Com- missioner J. Floyd Malcoin for better traffic flow in South Abi- lene was adopted. Malcom's re- commendation was that; Ross Ave. be made a from South First St. to South 14th Sts. That means that stop' signs will be placed facing the cross streets at their intersections with Ross. Only exceptions will be the South Seventh and South llth Sts. intersections. Seventh and llth are protected streets .and will remain so. Malcom, in urging the Ross Ave. measure, stressed what he regarded as the need for another north south protected street west of Sayles Blvd. suits and issues to be debated in the_coniinfr'fpur weeks. Ctltat Conference Yarborough. called a press con- ference Friday morning quickly on the heels of the governor's Thurs- day press conference. He denied Shrren' charge that Texas Ne- groes have been "promised some- thing" for their support. He said be has not and will not promise "any any- thing not promised publicly in tins campaign." He accused the governor of try: ing to stir up a be- tween the white and Negro races. "I think he has purposely gone out and tried to inflame the whites to get them to forget. everything else about his Yarborough said. Yarborough said his first run-off speech will be at Johnson City .Sat- urday night and challenged Goy. Shivers to meet him there for an open debate on the issues of the campaign. Meeting Slated Regional meetings of'his cam- paign workers are set for next beginning Tuesday at Lub- bock. The rest of his itinerary is still indefinite, he said. Yarborough also'told his-press conference that he: 1. Has "absolute confidence" of winning the fun-off, 2. Considers "integrity in public office" his primary vote-getting is- lue in the first primary campaign 3. Favors segregation of the races in public schools but believes they should have equal facilities 4. Thinks the'gownor hik pallet his "maximum strength" and wj never again get as many votes in Texas as he got in the first pri mary. Mercury Falls Into Low Cooler today! That's the word-from the weath erman concerning the string, o hot days dealt over Abilene. and vicinity. Rain is falling in East Texas near the Louisiana line, and'is ex pected to drag temperatures her into the 90-95 degree range. There isn't enough .push-from'this -Gu! storm, the weatherman t bring rain into West Central Tex as, but it win cool the air coming into the area. Thursday, the hottest it got was 99 degrees. This was the secon day in a row the temperatur stayed a shade below the 100-de- gree-or-over bracket SUNDAY HEADLINERS IN THE REPORTER-NEWS What's- in store for Central West Texas Crippled Children? Sunday's Reporter-News will give the construction date of the Taylor County Rehabilitation Center for Crippled Children; There'll also be a story.of how child- ren with'- bright minds, locked in-handicapped-bodies, are overcoming their problems: The Sunday Reporter-News will report on how and when additional millions will be spent in the next few months on Abilene Air Force Base. There'll be-the usual full coverage of sports, farm, oil and general news. You can reserve extra copies of the Sunday Reporter- News with your agent or nearest newsstand, for 10 cents. Action Sent To Ike After 61-26 Vole WASHINGTON Uti Congress ompleted action last night on the rst complete overhaul of the na- on's tax laws in 75 years, and loth Republicans and Democrats aimed they would profit more oliticaliy. Whatever the political effects lay be in the coming campaign or control of Congress, the action to the White House for vir- ually certain approval the bill resident Eisenhower had desig- ated as the cornerstone of his 954 program. Before a 61-26 vote in the Senate sent the bill to the President, Dem- xrats seized a final chance to nipe at some provisions. Only three hak Longer (ND) and Williams (Del) joined 22 Demo- rats and Sen. Morse dnd-Ore) voting "no." Supporters incliid- ed 42 Republicans and 19 Demo- crats. Assorted Cits The revision bill carries in-assorted tax cuts for in- ividuals and corporations in its irst year of in ater years. It does not change major .tax rates except to main- tain the 52 per cent levy on cor- poration income which dropped to 47 per cent April 1 and is extended retroactively. "Republicans the bill as capping a 7ivbfflion-dollar tax-reduction for any single year. This already has reen used in GOP campaign ma- terial. Democrats interject here that wo big boons to the taxpayer took effect automatically under a 1951 aw enacted when their party con- rolled -Congress. Z Big Reductions These include two big reductions vhich took effect Jan. billion dollars through a 10 per cent personal income tax cut and two billions through expiration of the corporation excess profits tax. On April 1 yarious excise tax cuts totalling a billion dollars took effect. These were fought by the Treasury but enthusiastically sup- ported by Republican congression- al leaders. Republicans also contend the big revision bill will be politically help- ful to them because it contains benefits for such groups as retired persons, families with heavy medi- cal expenses, mothers who must work to support their children, fathers with children in college who earn part of their way, and farmers 'With big soil conservation expenditures. GOP leaders froih the President down argue the bill will spur busi- ness by providing more funds for plant expansion and modernization through a wide variety of more liberal deductions for businesses. This will mean more jobs, they say. Democrats, claiming they witt benefit, say the bill concentrates benefits for big corporations and the wealthy, but does little or noth- ing for. the average little ,man. They tried in House and Senate to put-in a general tax cut, but were beaten back on close votes. The minority its fire on a provision in the bill giving relief to stockholders on their, dividend income. This provision was sharp- ly watered down from the form in which the President first recom- mended-it. But Democratic ora- tors contended that once the princi- ple went into the law ft could sever be uprooted and probably would be extended. Mere Are Few Savings on Tax Bite IB-- Here are some of the you as an in- dividual taxpayer can benefit through" 'the big tax revision bill how on President Eisenhower's deskr for almost certain signature: 'DIVIDEND INCOME-If you're a stockholder, you won't have to pay any at all on the first of incomevin Fur- thrimore, you can take 4 per cent of any .dividend income above and deaict that from your tax pay- EXPENSES You may deduct medical expenwsf above cent of income, .fch of S 'per cent at present, But jni mint remember that from now on-jw oolj deduct wnu spent for-drugs and medicines above 1 per cent of your income. Also, you can have a total med- ical deduction of for your family; the limit has been RETIREMENT INCOME-You won't have the basic '20 per cent tax rate on the first of re- tirement income .received after you pass. 65. If you're (retired government employe such as a teacher, fireman or policeman, you can get the benefit sven though you're under 65. WORKING MOTHERS-v-If you must wort to support children un- der 11 or other and if your hatband it incapacitated or fte combiMd team (f irjdf lentan ftNt. JMIMV dt- duct up to spent for child care. SOIL CONSSRVATION-If you're i farmer putting a lot of money into soil rebuilding, you may de- duct these outlays up to 25 per cent of your gross income. COLLEGE STUDENTS-Jf you have a child who is under 19 or is in .college and has a job which pays him more than year, you may continue to list him as a dependent with exemption on your return it you pay half of Us support.' CHARTTIES-You may deduct up to X per cent of ysur income for "charitable, contributions, la- irtead may deduct the' carrying charges! on such purchases, even though they're not specifically stated as interest in the contrad. HEAD OF HOUSEHOiOJ-If your husband or, wife djes, you may continue for two years-to get the full benefit of'income splitting at on a return. HEALTH i ACCIDENT PLANS you miss work because of an illness or an injury, you are en- titled to .tax exemption on pay- ments made to: you by your em- ployer, up to a week, if they, ore issued under a regular health and accident plan. The exemptum does not apply in the first (even days of u adtu 7011 DECLARATIONS 'OF ESTI- MATED TAX-If you're married and have up to of income, practically all of it subject to with- holding, you no longer need to file a declaration of estimated Ui. RAPID DEPRECIATION If you're a businessman or farmer, you may use the new double de- clining balance method of quick depreciation oo a plant or piece of equipment. This means that' in the first year of life, you can write off twice the amount for deprecia- tion now allowed; thus 'you can concentrate of the write-off in the early years of use of tat item. The accelerated plan wiB tantt get other relief, too, including: More liberal treatment for re- search expenditures. Greater freedom to set: aside sur- pluses. The rsjtt to offset a tea apfast profits of two prior yean instead 3 one at now. Elimination fee utilities of 1 per cent penalty tax OB dated returns. Greatly teptadej iowaacm ht miataf .A crt-off date Aarll; _ for the 8 per corporate IB rate, at wkfck'ttea it ft fr draft to f BIT eeat i   

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