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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: July 14, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - July 14, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               SLIGHTLY COOLER VOL. IZX1V, NO. 27 'WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD, EXACTLY AS IT M CTY TWA 'ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY EVENING, JULY M, 1954-TWENTY-SIX PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS' EVENING FINAL PRICE DAILY 5e, SUNDAY IQe Silvers'GOP tote to Get Court Review AUSTIN Bl-Tbe state Supreme ourt agreed today to review a ase challenging the use of Repub- an votes cast for Gov.. Shivers the 1952 election in figuring con- ention strength. It granted a writ of error in Beaumont test case in which e court could spell out what sys- m the Democrats should use this ear in computing the size of dele- ations to vital party conventions The issue is whether Shivers' 952 GOP votes should be counted addition to the Democratic ctes, or whether the Democrats an base convention delegations nly on Democratic votes cast in 952's general election. It is something new because hivers WES the first governor in 'exas' "history to be elected as he dual nominee of Democrats and Republicans. IT'S HOT HERE, may look pretty chilly, but it- Is around 20 degrees hotter here in the ice cream vault of Foremost Dairies than usual. Fred Johnson, vault man, holds' tip a thermometer which registers five degrees below zero where the normal temperature was 18-25 de- grees below zero before the heat hit this week. (Staff photo by Don Hutcheson) SHOWERS MAYBE? Air Conditioners Busy in TOTHeat "If West Texans had the sense of a "they'd move" "for the summer. "A bird comes south in the win- ter time and goes north in the summer." this was the Abilene weather- man's feeling 'about "the over-100- degrees weather1 in' -the -area. he predicted a slight cooling in the city'and surrounding territory: He saM, the. temperature range wouiH be''between 10K104 degrees. Due to showers east of.Abilene and" a cooling.of East where the winds are coming from, he should feel a drop in the There is a bare chance of: show- ers Wednesday nightt hfe said. Codling' wfll 'follow the'broiling 107 degrees registered Tuesday. Abilene's all-time high temper- ature was. JU .degrees, recorded on Aug. 10 of 1943. Tuesday's high reached-'at 4-p.'-m.' Electric-Business Booms But instead of making like a bird, Abilenians seemed inclined to sweat it out. They were using every: known, coojing. device. Air conditioning salesman ported they were being swamped with orders-for-new-installations. The biggest rush comes in the aft- ernoon. West' Texas' "Utilities' Co.' Tues- day set a new record for provid- ing electricity. -Transmission. .Su- perintendent J. F. Longley said the load was six to seven per cent higher than bis-record- for -last year.-Last-year-, -the- -peak electricity in August This year, it hit jn July, to make the consumption of electri city seven-to-eight per cent above this time last year. Loiigley "said he was sure.mos increase went into air con ditioners.-- Electric .power was.off for. about 12 minutes Tuesday night, ''.south and southwest" sections o 'Distribution Enginee John Hutchison said the power los was not. due to the extra demands but possibly because somethiri; was.on.the lines. Area included in the "blackout was west of Elm Creek, and be ween the Texas and Pacific tracks and South 12th St. Heat changed the habits of swim mers. Managers of both the VFW.and American Legion pools reported lore people were swimming later Rather'than face the direct ray f the mid-afternoon pools, folks were staying in the the.sun went down, they flocked o the pools around 7-8 p.m., swim ming until closing time. Highways in the area are hold ng up well. The maintenance per onnel of the Texas Highway De- partment said the only roads de manding new gravel were in area south of Merkel. These road were tar soft en and run on the roads bu most highways were holding firm Trace of Rain -Early risers around Abilen were met with a light sprinkl around 6 a.m. It recorded only :race at the weafter station. Bus Driver "Red" Wise reported his run into Abilene from Fort.Wort was .studded with showers all th way. Good showers were found t See HEAT, fg. 7-A, Col. 1 Pittsburgh Police Get Special Dujy- On Golf Course PITTSBURGH HI. Sever Allegheny County (Pittsburgh) p licement have a choice assig ment. The cops, all golfers, will go o on.the three county golf cours next week. They'll, look .like-t average fellow trying to brei par. But they have orders wo ry too much about their "scor They've been ordered.to keep the lookout for an apparently we organized gang of boys steali golf balls. Usage Spurts Absentee Voting jghf in Primary Ninety absentee ballots in the uly 24 Democratic primary elec- on had been cast in the county erk's office at noon Wednesday. An additional 66 absentee ballots hat have been mailed out brought total absentee voting strength date to 156. Mrs. Chester Hutcheson, county erfc, said another four requests or absentee ballots that will be lailed out today would raise the gure to 160. She said-the absentee voting is extremely light in comparison with revious election years and credit- d interest in the City of Abilene's bond election next Saturday with drawing .in some of, the absentee rotes. Mrs. Hutcheson said many vot- rs come to her office to vote hi he Democratic election after casi- ng ballots jn the bond election at the city hall. After Wednesday only four and one-half days will remain for ab- sentee votes in the''July" 5K pri- mary. Tuesday, July 20, is "the deadline. Foreign Aid _ Arguments Slated WASHINGTON Ifl-The Eisen- hower administration goes .back to Jongress today with arguments for ts foreign aid program, already rimmed than 10 per cent and facing probable attempts to cut it further.- The 'Senate Armed Services Committeexalled Acting Secretary, of State .Walter Bedell Smith and Adm. Radfprd, chair- man of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, to a closed session today on the mea- sure, now slimmed to by the Foreign Relations Commit- 'Back Water, Other Scarborough Urges Voters Americanized Quick LONG Calif, m Ca- nadian born Ronnie Tadman, in- surance salesman, sold his first policy in the morning. In the af- ternoon, he drove to court where tie became an American citizen. When, he returned to his car, he found his first traffic ticket under his windshield wiper. GONE FOREVER Precious flood waters which the city could hap saved .with .f-nSrl! statooftj quate iacilities are shown going over ihe -picture shows the water ilowpg the dam about 2 r waste It will install thre additional David Barros) and muchlof it' 'all Phantom Hill? election thfe city will preveSt this in jthe dam. (Staff photo by WHAT'S NEWS ON THE INSIDE A'HAPPY 10 years, how about working o 30-hour drawing more pay? See Hal Boyle column. Page 8-A. GUATEMALA warning to the United States is plain in the recent incidents down in Guatemala. Page 6-B. ELECTION UNFAIR Circuit Court of Appeals .rebukes National Labor Relations Board, voids elec- tion among. West Texas Utilities Co. employes. Page 6-A. War Bride's Found in Texas By EAKLE WALKER Dallas Scarborough, attorney and former mayor, Wednesday urged Abilenians to support all bond issues on next Saturday's city election ballot He has been an outspoken fight- er against some earlier bond pro- posals "here. But Scarborough said he will vote for each of the five bond is- sues on Saturday's ballot Speaking of the waterworks bonds, he declared; Keep Adding: More "A growing city seldom solves its water problems. When we built Lytle Lake, the people thought we were all fixed When we built Lake Abilene for about S.ooo people, we felt like we were fixed Then we added Lake Kirby ;or a couple thousand more. Again we thought we were all fixed "If :it hadn't been for two flash floods on the Lytle in the last three years, we would be in a predicament right now for water. "The plan worked out by the-en- gineers will add a substantial amount of .water to our presen supply. We must make available an the water on all the streams within Scarborough didn't, mention Lake Fort (Phantom :Hill, the city', largest reservoir. Increasing'the supply in Phan torn Hill lake is one of the' mai objectives of the waterwork bonds.' Deadman; Creek will be chan neled into Lake Fort Phantom HOBIiS, N. M. (fl The five-1 received lacerations, a Seminole -1---'-'------" reohths'-old daughter of a Japanese war bride and a former soldier was kidnaped and attacked early today. Jackie Jo Davis, daughter of Mr." and Mrs. Jack Davis, who live just across the Texas line from here, was abducted from her home by a dinner guest, who police'said lives in Seminole, Tex. The strapping 195-pound riian was heU in'Seminole following his arrest, near the car. iii which offi- cers said he abandoned the baby. Gaines County (Tex.) Attorney Bill Curry said he.: would file charger "kidnaping or rape or both, depending on the condition physician said. He. described .her condition, as "good." Curry said the arrested man was a dinner guest in the Davis home last night and had baked a chicken for them. Mrs. Davis, 26, left him in the tiny two-room cabin in which Jackie Jo was sleeping while she went to the nearby Club Morrice just across' the'state line in New Mexico where her husband is a bartender. The Davis cabin a only 20 or 30 feet inside the Texas line.' When she returned "the child and Davis.were the Davis1 other child, SMI, Johnnie, 5, wai stih, asleep' and un- JackM JO. t Hny brunette infant. Banned. Mr. and Hrt. Davit oat- THE WEATHER ried in Japan, where their son was nm. Davis left her there for a time while'he became established in the United States. He returned his family to this country just a year ago yesterday; Mrs. Davis said she had been told a knife apparently was used to mutilate the little girl. Deputy Sheriff J. C. Fort of Lea County, N.M., said Davis found the man with Ws daughter in the car, seized her from him and took" her to the Seminole' hospital. There, he notified Texas .officers who called police in Hobbs. Seminole police took the -ear, which had been- abandoned. Fort said the car was fone when he. HW1 arrived, bat ha tracked UN U.S. DETAITMEST OF COMMEKCE WEATSEK ABILENE AND VICINITY this tonight, a Thtmfer. oxter OOf UUnm Milimum temptataTB 1M-1M dccrm Unr-tWItlit at Ti'ttfntt. Hllk Thradaj Uie nine. Bxrc ebanee for showers NOKTH CENTKAL AND WEST TEXAS Pirtly clown Uiroojh Ttamitf with wld If scattcrtd. Not mv ki m -icmperauire.- __ EAST AND -SOOTH CESTKAt -TEXAS Ttrtt-f ttauofV ItaniKf. .WMe Kttterol UiffluHniioireri. Not randi duM T .__. TEMTEUTDWES DALLAS' SCARBOROUGH won't scratch'an-issne Hill More pumps will be added the Clear Fort pumping station o as to lift more water from tear Fork into that lake. Gates will be made in, the channel dam, Iso; to giye Phantom Hill more from "the Clear Fork. Scarborough is well acquainted with the struggle Abilene has made for an adequate water supply to meet its growth. Lake Abilene was built in his admihis ration as mayor. As to the sanitary sewer bonds, Scarborough said: "The sewer is- sue must be carried The people lave been dnnkiag sewer water long enough. It should have been done in the first place, but since it wasn't done, let's get the sewer farm off the (Lake Fort fhantom Hill) Water shed as quickly as [wssible." town he said. "Some of my neighbors don't" He. loons upon the fire station bonds as a way to cut down on the fire losses in AbUene. This, he said, would mean a reduction in the fire Insurance; premiums. Scarborough put in a plug for the park and playground bonds as a help in preventing delinquency. Delinquency Problem "Child delinquents are one of the problems in our civiliza- he declared. "Chjldren who are entertained seldom turn out badly It's a lot cheaper to main- tain parks and playgrounds than the" penitentiary and Juvenile de- linquency to the criminal courts." Qualified voters who are also city taxpayers win vote Saturday on five separate bond issues'. (1) Waterworks, million; itary sewers, million, (3) street improvements, million (4) fire stations, (5 parks and playgrounds, On Geneva LONDON Minister Churchill bitterly with Clement- Attlee former Labor Prime'Minister, today in a House of Commons debate over the seat- ing of Communist China in the Uni- ted Nations. Attlee started off by accusing Secretary of State Dulles of "play- ing right into the hands of the Communists" by failing to return to the Geneva conference. He said it is "wrong, unwise and contrary to tie principles of the United Na- tions" to bar Red: China'from that organization. Churchill replied that an effort now to force Red China into the UN would be regarded in the United States as an "uncalled for act-of unfriendliness." Cnurchffl accused Attlee of mak ing "one long whine of criticism against the United States and of course advancing the importance, if not the virtues, of Communist China." Churchill emphasized that Red China was still technically at war with the United Nations and was "stimulating the war in Indo- Consumption Far Above Other Years Abilene water consumption this week soared to a new all-time than 22 nullion gal- lons a the heat climbed over 100 for the fifth day in a row. Tuesday total consumption rose to a new high double the amount used July 13, 1993. Last year on that day, the city used only gallons Until this' summer, the record high was set on August 11 of 195J. The record for last year was used on June 23, 1953. However, Tuesday was tte fourth day this year that Abi- lene's water consumption was over 22 mdliou gallons this year. The other days were July 7, 9, and 12. Is there any chance of water rationing? Not unless there is an equipment failure, Harlin said. Mow, the city is attempting to meet the peak demand by running its machinery, pumps, and filters wide open during the rush hours. The rush starts about mid-aft- ernoon and continues until around 8 p. m, Harlin said. As he demand builds up, the water department speeds up and opens up more equipment As use falls off, the machinery slows down. 'Hwlui said-Wednesday that if Saturday's vote approvertbe new bond issue, there will be little danger of being caught short water oexf For one thing, the bonds will give the city money to build lire million gallons -worthjrf; clear wa- ter storage. Now, ih'e-eiiy.ljas no cushion against huge demands, should equipment fail With the new storage, the" fl- ier plant can work open when de- mand is low to fill up the new storage tank When demand in- creases, water will be turned into the mains from the extra storage Pressure drops in the southern area of Abilene when there is a heavy draw on the water supply. The bond issue will provide funds for one and one-half million gal- lons worth of overhead water storage on the south side. This will mean both more pressure and more storage another cushion to growing demands. MONEY CROP DESPITE HEAT STELLA, Neb. Herbert Walker stood watch- ing the hot winds blow over his com field and casually remarked that even if the crop did ourn up there was money in the field. He had plowed under his podtetbook, containing ?87 while cultivating Use crop. HOLMES NOT MAD AT ANYBODY New Sewer, Plant Top-priority project under the sanitary sewer bonds is to build a new sewer treatment plant -and sewer farm away from the Lake Fort Phantom Hill watershed. Some sewage from the present disposal farm gets into that city lake. The ex-mayor said he believes the street improvement bonds should be passed in fairness to all the people. "I have pavement' to rifle to Yarborough, Skivers Swap Reds; Tidelands Charges By CLAYTON mCKEBSON Associated Press Staff Gov. Shivers says Ralph. Yar- borough is the capttve of persons who don't want to get tough with Communists. Yarborough Shivers was duped on the tidelands deal by the governor's Republican friends." The jibes featured the gover- nor's race Tuesday. Shivers told a "rally at Center he knew Yarborough was no Com- munist. But he said the Austin at- a captive: of certain peo- ple who do not approve being ough on Commvnists." ook Mr. Shivers oa a tidelands snipe hunt." The Republican administration, .'arborouga charged, now seeks to back out on the tidelands by rec- ognising only three miles offshore, ather than 10.33 miles, as .Texas' Senators fo Check WASHINGTON Senaton were ready today to check on re-, ports that a former head of a federal lending agency made a windfall profit on a goveminent- insured apartment construction loan after ht left his job. "Is it Shivers, in a ques- tion to "my principal asked, "that- you wfll try to get Anti Communist Law re- pealed? Since you said, seven weeks ago, that you would not comment on the US. Supreme Cowl's sefretation decision until yon had studied'the opinion, when are you goim to maki a statement clarifying yoor pntthnt" Yarborough, speaking to a Bay- town rally crowd. Kid Ttiwr Shivers has said be supported Republican Dwight Eisenhower for the presidency because Democrat Adlai Stevenson said he wooM veto a tidelands bill. "The governor's 'big oW ap- parently turned into a Taw deal' and the most cokoal polit- cal fraud of an Yarbor- oufh shouted. Shivers aiain asked Yarbonwgn .0 deny that he has promised Saota Tent pottkal bon George Parr that a deawip County win be called off. Yarboroufh denied' the accma- lioo aad m torn Mid SWrm a went dol-with Pur the water conservation program for the state. He said Texas needs SO new dams but that Shivers blodrSd projects on the Nueces and Cana- ian Rivers., Yarborough tbM the laytown rally: "Mr. Shivers didn't object to the Falcon Dam being built on the Rio Grande. He has property down there." The governor accused Yartor- ough of starting "an ntfy that they'-by impBofioe, were going to abolidt the State Orphans Home at Corsfcana." "That, in my the tw- ernor said, "fc the cheapest form of demafoguery and lowest down political trick Tre ever heard of -trying to make a pctt-cal foot- ban out of a bunch of poor orphan chOdren who need the saot ten- der, Mat care TOOT Mm chaaren need." rota Doke rf YarberooH Bajtown _t _ J fcaa Rf WMCwa iHlfMB Ml Wffluai UcCnw, famr Taut wto AdW SIMM.. nl. a radto s sn ..v Craw saM 
                            

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