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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 20, 1954 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - June 20, 1954, Abilene, Texas                                 PARTLY  CLOUDY  ®he Abilene l^poÖerSUNDAY  'WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES"—Byron  VOL. LXIII, NO. 366  Associated Pres* (AP)  “abILeNE, TEXAS, SUNDAY MORNING, JUNE 20,1954—SIXTY PAGES IN FIVE SECTIONS  PRICE DAILY 5c, SUNDAY lOC  Guatemalan Admits  Rebels Drive Inland  MEAL TIME Y'crda Spann. 4, sits closely by while her mother, Mrs. Jimmy J. Spann,  feeds 10-inonth-old Jimmy. Mrs. Spann is the widow of Patrolman Jimmy Spann, killed Thursday night in a biazing gun battle. (Photo by Charles CockerelP.  TOTAL: $3,028.10  Dollar Fund Growing Fast For Jimmy Spann's Family  <Kfl«tcd M*m% »« r«<»' •  Tl'^hc.atoJ M'ileriî.ins s,a tvday  h.oi,    ■    • : ■ .lifviry Sf .nn    Vnpri'-  i.„t    .1    fu"d t- .. to'a. OÍ    rj8 W  Ml.    the tolal 't'd 1-    J’    ! r -'t.  th.-UKM. for tiH-iCS an entire Id-t‘me ahe.«tt f«»r Mtí s '.-.nn anu tr.    you:- ’te"".    4 »>. '•  . -imy. 10 ir ’il.h T';ey l<>-t t’ie.r n'-*• imi i t,i-f T. loi*.-’" '1  I ;t in yun    !c  a ♦ ; ’H‘\e m a MerK-I filL* y I..'!,  Kunoi.il f'T >he \*>U!    |V‘! '• nuin  ••• * uo (or Ili a ni MtHHi.iv at 1 .e H • hl.tnd fhuroh of v’hni.1 f\i t'.H' -ei? NVllI IV»    r-s    of  ti»e .Ahiirne Polu e iVi .îrtiîiont TN’v are t'apt. Thon'as P. Sum ineis. spi Milburn K DefU'.nn and Paîrelmon Jame*:    A Stanford.  Henry 1 Zimnunman. Fl*’>d v'' I:« h-1!. Martin K K.^ir!.. J, me*- O e- ; .a d <>!» n H sur -  'S.'.e Vk.ï- a 'tady jiriK i All tl i> !•■!»- UiUUyv into the He ;• Neus ■ iiu- Witt* (•■'.( > brin.*:* :■ 'ti • l'i ti: ’ îund They ! It t.l li-ty Hov^.Â;d. aro'^'dei.t of S a d Me -nants \a :> 1 np! : Cluii. pte . K ;T fiki freon liu'  MARTIN, GUNMAN NOT RELATED  W K Martin. 197h Savles Ht>uk‘\ard. s^id Saturday he is ni)t a brothcr-in-iaw of WiUanl Prankhn (BiUy' Gaither, as vtj prv.iously published.  G. 'Ou'r IS the gunman uho ;n ci’.iryi-il \uih fatally wounding Policeman Jimmy Spann m a gun balUe in a Merkel ru. e station Thursday night.  It was al .Martin’s home that llH- incident bt'gan which led ti» Sp.mn s death. Viaither con-(UKicd a reign of terror with a gun on .several iK'ople, in-iluding three txilicenien. al Martin’s home Martin is serv-KC manager for an vd vvell Si ! \ King compan.%  M.irtin .s full story of the aft-eriKHUi ot terror will apt'ear m .Monday mornirg’s Repnirter-.News.  Louik I. Ward........... 5.00  H. Wellman ....... 5 00  V k M Bank Club ...... 1361¥)  Thurman .\lhson ...... 2    00  Chark'.s Mead .......... 5    00  C. B. Hicks ........... 5    W  Anor.3 mous    .. ..... 5    00  .Mr -Mrs Lloyd M* Party    2000  Ladies .\u.\ihary \ F W -Post 2012    23    00  Guy W. -McCarty. Jr.    10    00  Anonymous    5    00  Empioyees of M si; M,  .\uto Works    ..    6    00  Frances C»sborne -city employ ee    —    2    00  Ross KempT. H    P.    ...    5    W  Noel Perceful-M\ I  of DPS      .'00  C L. Biown-Lic.  k WT of l> P. S    5    00  Collected al Hub Fvans Sc'tMce Staiu»n  240i> bliK'k of .’v>ulh 1st St.  By Friends of the  You'll Help, Won't You?  (An editorial)  In a period of less than two years, two Abilene policemen have met death in line of duty. The first, Patrolman Billy Rose, lost his life October 10, 1952, in a collision of his motorcycle and a car. The second, Jimmy J. Spann, died in a gun battle with a man he was trying to arrest last Thursday evening.  The w’ork of a policeman is necessarily hazardous. They are hired, often at very low wages, considering the hazards involved, to stand between the public and the lawle.ss. Their devotion to duty and their fearlessness is often not properly appreciated.  The tragic death of Jimmy Spann, a popular and efficient officer, shocked and grieved our community. The only practical w'ay we can e.xpress our grief and give meaning to our appreciation of his courage and devotion is by e.xtending help to his widow’ and two children, one an infant of 10 months, the other only 4 years old.  The Jimmy Spann Appreciation Fund offers an opportunity to help his grief-stricken little family, and give proof that the community does not forget those who serve it. even to the extent of giving their lives in line of duty. The Reporter-News has undertaken to receive these funds and to see that the widow' receives every penny contributed. We hope our people will find it in their hearts to be generous and prompt in responding. Every gift large or small will be acknowledged and appreciated.  3,400 T-Patchers Parade In Record 'Guard' Review  EXITED NATIOXS, N.Y.. June 19 jP—The United Nations Security Council will meet here at 2 p.m. (EST) Sunday in extraordinary session on the Guatemalan con-  him the Texas Service Medal and the Faithful Service Medal with 1 two bronze cactus leaves.    1  The Ambulance Company llUh | Medical Battalion of Whitney, was j awarded the Eisenhower trophy, given each year for the outstanding company size Texas National  NORTH FORT HOOD. Tex..  June 19 wP—I nder a blazing sun that parched troops and .spectators alike, more than 8.-100 sUcked-up T-patchers of Texas’ S6th Infantry Division today paraded before Gov.  -Allan Shivers and top civic and military figures of the state.  It was ‘ governor's day” and the ^ Guard unit in Texas.  T patchers ignored the 95-defree ^  ...............  heal to make it the biggest National Guard review in Texas peacetime history.  In the review also was the very latest military equipment, motor j vehicles and modern weapons. |  Shivers chose the occasion to j name Col. William E. Williams, prominent Austin physician and 36th DiMSion surgeon, a brevet brigadier general and to  8 Abilenians'  Fraud Trials Set Monday  Trials of eight Abilenians charged with fraud in connection with Veterans Administration housing loans are due to re-open in U. S.  Court at Lubbock Monday.  Trial of the cases started May i 12 and continued through May 18 with only one of two cases that | came to trial being finally disposed , of.    I  Raymond Thomason. Sr., was j the defendant in both of the trials, j The first resulted in a conviction | hict instead of Monday afternoon on all seven counts of the indict-1 ^ previously scheduled. The ment against him and the second change was announced late tonight ended with the jury being dismiss- i ^fter Guatemala s delegate ed after reporting they were dead-1 pressed repeatedly for the urgent locked lO-to-2 in favor of acquittal, session Thomason still faces trial on the second indictment.  Others who are under indictment and whose trials are set for Monday are Raymond Thomason. Jr.,  Monty Don Thomason. Mrs. Helen McMurry, Weldon L. Russell. Taylor W. Long, Jr.. \V. O. Hayter,  Jr.. and C. G. Stephens.  Indicted along with them by a grand jury in Lubbock the first week of May is American General Investment Corporation, which has its home office in Houston. This case also is set for trial Monday, i No indication has been given as * to which of the cases will be called | for trial first.    j  Judge T: WhitBeJd Davidson of j Dallas will be presiding in the court at Lubbock for the trials.  Predicts Own Army Will Win, However  TEGUCIGALPA. Honduras, June 19 (/P)—Guatemalan President Jacobo Arbenz Guzman declared in a radio address tonight that invading forces have made penetrations of “some kilometers” into Guatemala but predicted victory for his own army.  Parts of the speech w'ere inaudible due to jamming by the clandestine Guatemalan radio.  Security Council    Arbenz,    speaking in a  Sets Special Meet  NEWS INDEX  Reds Closing Gap, Defense Men Told  SECTION A  Teachers' Pay.........Page 4  Gambler's Death.......Paga 6  Crop CantTolf   Page 7  Poiittc« .............Pot« 9  SECTION B  Famous Hendrick Home . Page 1 Magnolia to Abilana .... Paga 1  Senator, Mather  Page 2  Buildirtf New*  .......Page    4  New Abilene High ...... Page 6  Beak News........Peg«s    t,    9  Bditonais ...........P«g«    10  Business Outlook  Paga U  SECTION C Women's News ....Paget 1-10  Church News........Paga    11  tadia, TV ..........Paga    11  Amusements Pagas 12, 13  SECTION D  and strategy’ matters. But even while the defense chiefs were meet-  in, I 'r'l 1,1'  H, T> W the Y  ' n.  a  .( ai : ll;o  brought to the Hejxirler-News or m..iK J to the iuv.>paper. Ghevks siiouid Ih* made pa>able to the Jiniiny Spann Appreviatuni Fund Hie tuiid Will be usiii to provide flu Mr.N Sp.uin and the children.  tv a T  I . !* ■*1 *.-d d.  t .‘ii  . -I p - ket a. v-J! ’ Ú  C V"  k<;  1* t \ut>  lUiubk I *:  \ i Indep  \ . in, ..iUl'il    .  . t>n a -    •'=    .    ‘    -  ¡UI.- ijnty, t 1.= T’    .’Vi.  i-U    u,i\ r    - ! ‘    Î    n    ■ I    1*.    Í ■    • ■  dug    do=    !i    ui    t--    "  1 ■ la i«* up an dil-ui  vti.ei ot    .-^1 h  St-    It    'V    .,ji 1  ! ■    -t.;'    •( U'wn  ;!i    I'  . . 1! .ay I: V - i . e\lH . Î !  , i T t iwn  Î--.Î r a t  >!M out ' ■  tt'- \lVvK  AÎ-'  I .*d lUi'i!  WjUv Akin. Abih ne ni.tnai-er of I esûle Theatre-. announceii li.it the I’.irauioiiut >mI1 'l.ge a midriijit matinee th* n. hi of .luly 9, With all the pr.^ »■*»(> g*un ■ to t ie luiul. Kmplo\e^ wdl *î. ?u te tiiCíf tunc No    'S "ill be  oeduetvd from the pr^.veJ.  l outribiUion to ih. u«*1 may b*     l\i poi ter New ■»    $3iK> 00      Y k M Bank    tki      1 il./cn> Bank    . . 5tK> 0Ü      K;: L;!y Kiwii"";    00      Aii*>;)yiii‘Hii>    1ÜÜ0      mous    .5 00      May*ir C F G.'itlin    .. , 10 00      J h t**yd Mall *MU    ... 10 W      Hr W 1) Rich    . , lo w      A C batll ......    .... a 00      J.:n Paulk . ....    ... .10 00      (. Fiii.iugh    500      \1\ .i ul Mrs .1 V          \v,.'.‘rc.p    10 00      H..I honifield    5 1X1      Vnonv moil.'    5-lX)      in.';qviKient l.o.ui Co.    .. 2.3 00      I- \ iwllcrh    23      Drug Co    .. 10 00      .1 1) MiddlcbriHiks    5 00      Anouv mouN    •Al 00      CnHHxc F Muiri.'    5 m      AbJone Saving.' \»n    UK) 00      N.'ll McFall    5 00      Clt.u'le> Clarke    10 00     State-Wide Water Convention Asked     ’ Spanns    21 10      ' M & M Auto Works ..    23 00      Anonymous •.. •    100.00      Highland Church of          Christ ......    10 00      Don W Brad.ihaw    500      Geodwmical Sunov.s    25 00      Mr & Mrs S H Jennings          Sr    .3 00      ; F I.. Wtlh-s    SIX)      i Bryan Dun.?gin. Merkol    lO.tX)      i Mr A .Mr.* James .\          Reiger    .3 (k)      I W E. Yawn    a (»0      t William L Richardson    1 00      B H Boney    .3 00      T I) McCarty ... ...    SIX)      -Anonymous ......    10 00      ' B*'b .Alexander . .—    5tX)      i Windsor Garage .....    25tX)      ! Childers k Childer.s    .3tX)      .Anonymous    500      Sthuk k Webb    25 00      : Mr Ä: Mrs Carroll Dicken          MMl    1000      ' Bilhe McCiH'k    .3 (X)      ! .Anonymous •. .    lOOO      i .Mr k Mrs T F          i Trai'cy ....    3 00      i .Anonymou.'    10 00      ' H W I lobby n .......    10 iX)      .Anonymous    3. IX)      ■ Dr S H Kstos    10 00      I SiH'nce Hartman of -Abilene,      f Inc.    25 00      Harold Drillmg Co    25 00      .Mrs Jack D Landrum    lOOO      Abilene ImU'iH'ndent .Auto      Ikuilers .Assn.    100 00      The following lndei>cndeiu      Auto Dealei>    149 00     Cool Masses Bring lome Heal Reiiei  QU.ANTICO. \ a.. June 19 IT—  The nation's military high com-award j mand wa.s given disturbing word i ^    new and significant  today that Soviet Russia is moving | developments    abroad, including  closer to the I nited States in the,    uprising in    Guatemala against  great amrs race of the atomic age. j    Red-tinged    government there  Donald Quarles, assistant sec-j    military    conferees received  retary of defense for ^e^earch, ‘    move with obviously  made this view clear in addressing i pj^^^d    but    unofficial reaction,  i the defense chiefs at their annual ^.^n^vthing to remove the threat of meeting here when he said .Amer- communism from the Western iea’s v eapons technology pj^iuon jicmisphere. and particularly from today is “less favorable than it, geographical prcximity to the was a year ago.    y S.-owned Panama t’anal, was  Quarles spoke at a morning busi-! good new s for the men who are ness session of the four-day con- responsible for defense, ferente shortly before tlie arrival,---------  —-------  at Quantico of Pre.sidenl F.isenhow-    o T L.  er. The commander - in - chief • jtCpS TO I OkCIl  solemn voice, said the departments of Barrios and Chicamula “have been penetrated by the invaders.”  The Pre.sident accused Col. Rodolfo Mendoza, former chief of the Guatemalan air force w ho fled the country several weeks ago, of “machine * gunning women and children” in Guatemala City.  The broadcast, heard in Tegucigalpa, called Mendoza a “traitor.” The only deaths Arbenz mentioned were one child who he said died from wounds when hit in the mouth by a machine gun bullet.  Six persons had been reported wounded in the strafing.  Leaders of the “liberation army” of Col. Carlos Castillo Armas said their forces had penetrated up to 25 miles inside Guatemala in their march on the capital city and, “The people of Guatemala are arising to our cause ”  An invasion headquarters had been set up at the Honduran town of Copan, four miles from Guatemala's border.  Four of the top leaders, includ-’ ing the liberation army’s chief of information- Manuel Orellana Por-tilio, pmrticipated in the briefing of reporters there.  Fighting -Sporadic “Only spwadic scraps” with Guatemalan army forces were being fought, OreUana Portillo said. He added that at many places Guatemalan border guards had j been w ithdrawn. lea\ ing the frontier virtually undefended.  Earlier, the anti-Communist forces had reported the capture of Guatemala’s two chief ports, the shipping center of Puerto Barrios on the east coast, and San Jose, an air and naval base on the west coast. This claim was disputed by the Guatemalan gov-WASHINGTON, June 19 #-Jo- emment-seph Rider Farrington, delegate! The rebels said two other into Congress from Hawaii, was land towns, Zacapa. a dairy cen-found dead in his office at the | ter near the Honduran border, and Capitol tonight. He was 56 years RetalhuJeu in the opposite corner.  Sport» ......  Clossified Form, Markets  Foget 1-5 Poges 6-9 Poge 12  Congressman Found Dead  To Avoid Squabbles  B> THE A-SS(KIATED PRESS Two cool air masses Saturday brought spotty relief to the nation's superheated midsection, but ‘ spt'ke briefly and informally at a spilleii heavy rains and thunder-' lun*t>*Hjn of the wnterees. but what j storms where they bumped against ; he t-üked about was not disclosed , WASHINGTON. June 19 .P—Sen hot areas    !    The    conference    of    160    deîense    |    iR-SD*    said    today    he will  The rams caused floods in north- ^ >ervice secretaries and mili-    White    House    his  ern .^nd northwestern low-*i. forc-!{.^i-> commanders was called for i pj^^s for averting m the future ing hundretls of families to fli'C discussion of routine management j • completely reprehensible squab-  THE WEATHER  r S. DU’VBTMKNT OF tOMVIKBCK «AIVTHEK BlRKCl  CBU.FAI- VNP VICINITY Parti'  - . high Mond*i SS-  s.*. S M  !U  ANAlll A*’. J‘:ne I *    ^    N*    !'  1 Muii' B    pi*‘    '<'*1    (-do'  . - iiH't ’ < ouveiitu'ii -d nil (i,i!n>ns *n I V it' V;J>'l I" <le*  ■1 \ is w -‘et pi- 1 •W,    'V    î>.  i, ui\ I'im-piiul  Wilier    '  jM t'il 1., il clear o pv.'ple Ihi-m-elves . i«uit-.e we shoulil t.d .said in a s|>eeeh prepaied tor de livery at the tenth annual firii fiy of the Fraternity of the White Her on.  He said a gru.ss roots conven fioii “could bring tocellu i the pro lilemi of navigation of IUmhI urn tiol, of Ifrigution, ol sod cohmt vatiuB.”  t il!,, ei r i c IU..V on it  bil! >pi lit!  i>h U1I» tlu  \Sbat we Ml (lam the  . U) w ¡».It  .lohn . '11  it I.mid protiiKT a Texa plan m. do in Texas tor Texans U mulil '!ep up tremendously the do vel 'pineiu of our .state." Jotuison U'ld h s aiulienee  pie H .ilernilv ol Ih« \Uuit' Her 01; nil h Jttlm.M'ii addi es.M'd is an or i-m.dion of iKTMm.s interested ill I'lomi'lmg deveKipment and im piovt'menl ol the Tnmly river Ji'hnson comnuMide*! progrès.-; m.uie in developing the trinity iind uihei livers on an individual basi.'  ‘Dm real need is to luck le the watt'i problem on • slalevvide basis with the same energy and enthusia.sm Ihal hat been displayed on Uie Trinity.” said Johnson, who is up fur reelecUon this year “We must canalize all of our rivers th.it offer practical iwi'sibi lutes foi baige navigation”  à  Ben F. McGUuhlin A Sons Automobile Auction Co Abilene Auio S»'rvue Tay Uu CiHinly Wrovkms; t o I    H    R.    Hendrix  t    S    N    Hafc^ett  i    T    R    \tebb Automobi!. -  lime Lamb Moior-Mon us Oliver M*itor j    M    ,A    St-:;i-:us Molois  I    Thail    U.dl  I F \V. t'ouch Auto-Rose Finance Co 1,'he.s McGlothlin A*;enc:  Texas \VnHkiivg Cumiumv Owens  Mii.ser M*4ors Stovall MtHers John Gray Motivt V 0 Dunn Minllcal Arts Phannacy    50 00  Anonymous    U)    IK)  Ray Trammell ..    5    oo  TOTAL .............. |3#2«W  their iKvmes and ruining ctoins j They aLso cooled oli some parts ' of theMidw est which has Iveen wilting under a record-breaking spring j heal wave.  j Crop damage mounted by the hour in northwestern and northern Iowa a.s fltxid waters raged through a score of river valleys. The floods began Thursday night and early Friday when most of the area got storms averaging thri*« to six inches of rainfall Hundreds of northern Iowa families had either evacuattnl their homes or moviNl some of their pos-.se.ssions to safety. Rescue teams with motor boats were onlered Sat-unlay to the town of thuiwa near the ^Iissouri River on Iow a s western Inmler In Sioux City, wherei a flash fliHwl on the Floyd River twk 14 lives a year ago. residents | ulo’u; the .stream got ready for an J overflow due to I'caih its ere.st late Satunlay mghi or early Sun day.    i  No loss of human hie w as re- j poitiHi m the Iowa IUhxIs    (  One stationary high pressure mass over the Appalachians pre-ventvxi the normal flow of weather 1  out of the Midwest fur several ^ * , , , -, dj-%vC davs. The other cixU mass ihH u{ |^aLLINC ALL BUT j the Pacific Norihwe.st has slowlv ^houldertHi under the Midwest hot air nui.ss The two Civol ir.óNSi's iouunI lorces over the htsid ol the Gn'al Lakes early isaturda.v .-\n unolfieial Irt inches **f rain was nu'iisurcHi in Iowa while Rinh-e.ster. Minn., had nearly 2'^ inches olfuialb.  bies ” such as he said marked some parts of the .McCarthy-.Army hearings.  Mundt. who presided at tlie stormy telev i;^ sessions, is draft* i ing legislation to create a special coonlinatmg committee to seek cooperation and peaceful relations between congressional invest igal-  oid.  Metropolitan police said a report to them indicated death was due to natural causes.  Farrington, a Republican, had represented the territory’ since 1942.  His was the second death of a member of Congress today .  Sea. Lester C Hunt. 61. committed suicide by shooting himself in the head with a .22-caliber rifle this moncng.  Police saia it was reported that  near the Mexican border, might well be in rebel hands though they made no precise claun.  Col. Castillo, leader of the revolution, was reported to have established a secrN; headquarters inside Guatemala.  Casualties Reported First casualty reports came from the Guatemalan radio, which said several persons were killed and injured during a bombing raid on the capital this morning. The number of casualties was not given. Tliis was the tiiini bombing raid  wurm    MMi  Washington. D.  or    iJ*owri»  grt MiouiiO nu>: '.,ns  I KNTRxi XNp wrsT tkxas  »tHS    SuiVUAv    HI-.'    Xt'-n  t4-i> vvhirb neiti-red ihunUer*».'««!» Sue-ád} *(\i'rrec'or nir.r.U  TI MI’AR vn «àS  Sil r M  I »  : ^  t  . M t- SI  u  • U>  branch oí the government.  Farrington died of a heart attack. | on the capital. Two attacks were When he failed to keep an ap- ^ade there Friday.  and it was learned he Except for the rkis, .Associated Press dispatches from Guatemala City said, the capital was quiet. The people were sanl to be taking the situation calmly.  The rebels’ secret radio report-  was a native of i C.  not at home, a check was made si his office, where he was found dead.  Police and summoned  the coroner vrere  See REVOLT. Page 2-A, Cel. I  U.S. EMBASSY SHUTTERED  h-i  IÍ !>'  Three Air Raids Strike Guatemala's Capital City  TItUih inU kl« leiuivi lor Î4 houit )W S JO pm -V »ml '♦ his * w'd k"* lemivTiluitfe hc 2« iK-urn Imi    *««1  su;*»*-* 1»»; OKIU 4« f m    u<  d*)    .13 » m *>an»*r$    " AS 1'  liân'iiu'iii    «I    •    a*    P e* *  UrL'U'e huiniUii} »I A Ä V »« A4'..  IÏ  .wst by the revolutionary forces warm'd Guatemalans of large-.•scale airpower demonstrations agamsl the government day.  TO GOLF TOURNEY  ■«I  R.  riH"  , II'*    Ab ivi'O  rv't 5*en» if* crttfv ' T,i Of** '».aI Af-ilivii-ill*. I  .bdin  Sam  Trumon Und«rga«s Emergency Surgery  BlT.l.KTlN KAN’S.AS CITY. SuBday Jua# tt .Ik—Fenner PreeWent Truniaa was taken t« eurierjr ta Reneareh ||o!*plUl at lf;M a.m. today for aa einergeacy operatloa.  ■I.- be v.»e U’ui 'Ci..;' l'ame i.'  »He st vf'O c.it thè ent-s Motvk p,!.;*' N D    sc.'tu'rt    in  ' KepOftef-Nlev*'    ftturn t»  t*v tmail K' thè »poftv *j«'^'ort’went  Remember. thete •' r*o e»vtf> tee orni .40 qreen tee *v chofqe*.f dur-ìiyg hJurrtOfi'ent competition. And, tor o look ot thè hondsort»« trophios to he o*'Otded    tN picturt in  th# sport' sectke»  Remember. mail vour erUrv blook todov  GUATEMALA. June 19 iP — J The fir-^t raid came at about 4 Three air raivls have    struck    Gua- P ('(■    .'^J^terday.  tómalas c.i|)il-l nly    m 11»    lirsl    Cl.,mi«liiw    radio r»|»rU broad  24 iHHirs ot the anti-Conununist »iKHHing w ar against President,  Jacobo Arbenz Guim.vn’s government  .A tighter plane - appareiuly a ThundeiiJolt — met antiaircraft I fire as it strafed the cdv airtHvrl al 8 am imlay in the latest at-la*.k. The straiing    damaged a  plane on tlH> gixjund    On the    wav  back to Us base, the lone itghver , IvomiHvl the small sulnirban community ot Villa Canales Diving through ram ctouvls, a C47 eailier swept over the center I ol the capital at about II p ni last night. Tracers from aiilian-craft guns throughout the capital  Sixty persons have taken refuge m the El Salvador Embassy, awaiting safe cmiduct papers to leave the counu*y.  In a broadcast today. Interior Minister Charnaud MacDonald an-later to- iK'unced “new and flagrant acts of ' aggression by air against the cap-  .Vs tension grew here, the I S . Httl Embassy iniUed iron shutters over all wimiows and doors, damping heavy bars inside Ambassador Jdui Peuriioy is remauung inside the embassy He conferred early tvkiay with f  Guatemalan Foreign Muusler tiuil-lermo Tonello in the presence of French and British diplomats here The embassy aiuiouniievl that tw o V S families on a Point Four as signment on a rubber plantation  • \llies’ Mentiuoed  MaclHinald charged that the raids were caused by “the enemie.s of tiuateinala aini their powerful allies "  The Interior Muustry announced  blazed. Some narrowly missevl the, have been evacuated to the com plant, which disa|vpeared after a ^ paiativt safety of Guatemala City Itaflei-dropping barrage .A govern- J Pan .American Work! Airway s ment fighter plane reportedly and other commtrcial airlines an crashed in the tumult last night.! nounced suspension of all flights kilUng Um pilot    I    ui and out of Guatemala  I  I  the lull to anii-Cominuiusl invaders of El Flonda. a town on the Honduran frontier Hut the nimis-try denied reports tluit Guatema-la’.s chief seaport. Puerto Barrios, hzal been cai>turctl by rebel forces leil by Carl<M Castillo Armas.  Reports reaching here said that peasants mobbed a passenger train between Plierto Barriai and Guatemala City, forcing all Ida passengers to get out.  i    *    '   

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