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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 19, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 19, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               FAIR, HOT "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT EVENING FINAL VOL. LXIII, NO. 365 (AT) ABILENE, TEXAS, SATURDAY EVENING; JUNE PAGES PRICE DAILY Se, SUNDAY Me :NEW PREMIER Premier designate Pierre Mendes- Franceycenter, talks to newsmen in Paris after visit with trench Pres. Rene Coty. Mendes-France's sweeping vic- tbry in his bid to become France's 20th postwar Premier came as a surprise to many Americans. (NBA Telephoto) French Premier Homes Cabinet By PRESTON GROVER PARIS Pierre Men- des-France today, named his new 20lh since France's liberation 10 years ago-rof 16 min- isters and 13 secretaries of state. He kept tbt foreign ministry for himself. Two members of the cabinet wen' from the Popular Republican Movement which had ordered its members to abstain from the voting when Mendes-France was confirmed. The MRP also decided net to participate in the govern- and take disciplinary action against members who defied the two MRP members named today were Robert Buron, minister of overseas territories, and Andre Monteil, secretary of state for the navy. Buron and Monteil voted for Mendes-France in spite of the party call for abstentions. Mendes-France named Edgar Faure minister of finance, a job he held in the Laniel government Gen. Pierre Koenig. a follower of Gen. Charles DeGaulle, was ap- pointed minister of defense. Fran- cois Mitterahd, who resigned from the Laniel cabinet because of dif- ferences of policy on French Union affairs, was named minister of the interior. He is a member of the Democratic and Socialistic Union of the Resistance. 2 Guatemalan Ports Reported Captured OFFICERS HELP Fund for Spann's Widow at French-American Talks Seen On Indochina, Other Issues By JOHN M. HIGHTOWER WASHINGTON '.ai -Top-level talks oo Indo- European defense, and other appeared possible to- day as a followup to the Eisen- hower-Churchill meeting opening here next week. This prospect was brought out yesterday in a letter sent by Presi- dent Eisenhower to French Presi- dent Rene- Coty and made public bv the White House. Eisenhower, noting he would be meeting informally with Prime Minister Churchill and British Foreign Secretary Eden the week- end of June IS, told Coty he looked forward "to resuming with the government of France such inti- mate conversations as I have had the past." letter was regarded by dip- lomats as a gesture of friendship reassurance by the American leader in advance of a meeting in which the French will not partici- pate, and at a time when the (ov- efFraaee had into banif of a new premier, on whose'.ideas American officials have in the past been critical. The Eisenhower message was. considerably more than an action of friendship, however, because in carefully constructed language it warned the French that so far as the United States is concerned time is running out for ratification of the proposed European Defense Community. The EDC is a V.S.- supported plan for a six-nation de- fense system in which Germany would take part The message advised the French government, moreover, that while the United States remains deeply interested in forming a "united de- fense" against Communist forces in Indochina, it is reserving the right to judge what might be done under any future decision. The Jimmy Spans Appreciation Fund climbed to an even Saturday morning. The fund was launched Friday with SSOO gifts each from the Re- porter-News. Citizens National and F. and M. National Banks. It win be used to assist the wid- ow and two children of Policeman Jimmy Spann, who was fatally shot at Merkel Thursday night is a gun battle with a fugitive. Gifts may be brought to The Reporter-News, or sent by mail. Checks should be made out to the Jimmy Spann Appreciation Fund. Strong support for the fund was wing given by radio station CWKC, which told of the campaign in newscasts Friday night and Sat- urday. Manager A. C. Etter said the station is eager to boost the effort The city commission Friday urned over its paychecks to the und. It included each from HEW DONATIONS Gifts received Friday: Previous total Key City Kiwanis...... 250.00 Anonymous 10.00 -J. Fiwi 10.00 Dr; W, D: Rich 10.00 A: SM Mayor C. E. Gatlin, J. Floyd Mal- -om and Dr. W. D. Rich, and from Crutcher Scott. Commission- Jack Minter was absent from Friday meeting. Officers and ex-officers were do- ing their bit for Jimmy Spann. Contributions have come in from Texas Hanger Jim Fault High- Patrolman G. G. >ltzhugh, ormer policeman Dick Wynn, and ;-Police Chief J. V. Waldrop and Mrs. Waldrop. Eden, Smith Leave Geneva Conference By EDDf GILMORE ..JGESEVA W-British Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden and U.S. lidfrstcretary of State Walter Smith will leave the Geneva conference tomorrow. There was no information as to whether either intends to return. A U.S. announcement said Smith was flying back to Washington at the request of President Eisenhow- er and Secretary of. State John Foster Dulles to nuke a personal report on the Indochina peace talks. During Smith's absence the U.S. delegation will be headed by the American ambassador to Czechoslovakia, U. Alexis Johnson. Informed quarters said Eden would return to London by way of Paris, where he will talk with the new French Premier, Pierre Mendes-Fraoce. The British em- bassy in Paris announced Mendes- France hat accepted an invitation THE WEATHER OEPAHTMC.-T OF COMMEHCC :w- ll'UUC ABILENE AND >M IKK SXUnUy HUh both Oil. M-1H. Low 73. NOXTX CCKTIUI, AND WEST TEXAS: rtrtlr EAST AND SOCTIt CENTRAL TKXAS: tocKMir Uvrawli MUr aflemooa Mohrnte U tocul- tf WM>  about straw, bat of the officers bettered dfrfnmOtd by MtW ef fvrcnHM U.S. tOeUs iipusiid tan mtot crwtktt PHENEC CTTY, Ala. W-Crime- fighting Albert L. Patterson. Ala- bama's newly nominated attorney general, was gunned to death in his car here last night just as he had predicted he might be. The 59-year-old Democratic no- minee, who was to take office Jan. 17, was shot in the mouth by an assassin who, officers said, appar- ently rammed a small caliber pis- tol between lips and fired twice. One steel jacketed cartridge was found wedged in an opening where two or three front teeth had been knocked out Early today, following an autop- sy. Circuit Solicitor Arch FerreB said Patterson bad been shot three times, but be declined to tell where the third boDet struck. State investigators and the asso- ciate state toxicofogist who per- formed autopsy referred an questions to Ferrell. An associate in the ai.ti-vice cru- sading Russell (County) Better- ment Assn. blamed what he called Crime Syndicate" for the former state senator's death and vowed swift So did Patter- sto's former Army major ton, father's law linn. Howard presUeat Betterment Assn., which hat campaigned for years to clean up OB once and gaudy Phenix City, told reporters he had baard Patterson sty only Tuesday night that "they might try to me." said there's you to heht rv- criM. Mir tttm thtt K Ihtf M Hsl ht didn't want them to get by with it And they Then only Thursday night, just 24 hours before he was slain, Pat- terson told a Phenix City church group that "I have only a 100-to-l chance of ever being sworn in ai attorney general." Feaniogtgn said be will ask GOT. Gordon Persons to declare martial law in Phenix City and -that hit organization will demand a special grand jury and a special prosecu- tor. The Betterment Assn. has been deeply critical of Circuit Solicitor Arch Ferrell. who normally utoea cutes on behalf of. the state. The governor ordered Maj. Gta. Walter J. Hanna, Alabama adjut- ant general, to Phenix City imme- diately with fun authority to take whatever steps he considered nec- essary. Uniformed National Guard officers steed by. Trime in this Southeast Alabama city across the Chattahoochee Riv- er from Columbus, Ga., long has fattened on soldiers from nearbr Ft Benning. Patterson's death came two separate investigation et nt- ing in the recent Democratic pri- mary ekctiom in which thePhe- oix City lawyer worn the Central mninatmi ever Lee ter of Gadsden by a margni ef a few hundred Totet. As Dem- ocratic nominee, Patterson wtt as- sured of formal election h) Nntjtt- her in this Democratic of the deep South. A special primary may he to select a HW DeaMratfc taMnll   

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