Abilene Reporter News, April 28, 1954

Abilene Reporter News

April 28, 1954

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Issue date: Wednesday, April 28, 1954

Pages available: 64

Previous edition: Tuesday, April 27, 1954

Next edition: Thursday, April 29, 1954

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Publication name: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - April 28, 1954, Abilene, Texas WARM; SHOWERS®i)c Abilene ^jporter~iBtcU)si"WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES"—Byron MOBNING VOL. LXXIII, No. 315 Attociated Press (AP) ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY MORNING, APRIL 28, 1954—TWENTY-FOUR PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS JOE ACCUSES Stevens Denies ^No Facts^ Chorge WASHINGTON. April 27 UPL-Sen. McCarthy (R-Wis) accused Secretary of the Army Stevens face to face today of “not giving us the facts” in their bitter dispute. Stev-ens heatedly denied it, and the fourth day of nationally televised public hearings ended on that angry note. It was a day of storm and stress from the outset, when (1) Stevens’ lawyer accused the McCarthy forces of “shamefully doctoring” a photograph they put into evidence, and (2) the McCarthy forces retorted Stevens ordered the picture taken to butter up McCarthy and put a damper on his investigation of the Army. McCarthy’s chief counsel, Roy M. Cohn, took the stand and got in some testimony on this and a number of other points. Side By Side The picture showed Pvt. G. David Schine, the drafted McCarthy aide, side by side with Stevens. The Army secretary’s counsel, Joseph N. Welch, Jr., produced an uncropped version showing two other men were standing with Schine and Stevens when the pic ture was taken. Off and on, disputes over these poster-size photographs flared up all day, while TV cameras recorded every maneuver in the fast-shifting probe by the Senate Investigations subcommittee. Then, to cap it all, McCarthy tangled with Stevens over a report the Army made last month accusing the senator and two aides— Cohn and Francis Carr—of bringing “improper pressure” to get special treatment for draftee Schine. “You’re not giving us the facts. Bob,” McCarthy chided Stevens at one point. Positively Denied Hotly, the Army secretary replied: “I positively deny anything I said here was not the facts, so far as I know.” McCarthy contended Stevens filed the charges against the McCarthy side to halt their hearings on alleged espionage at Ft. Monmouth. N.J. Stevens said that just wasn’t so—the Army made its report, he said, in response to a request from Sen. Potter (R-Mich). “Let’s be a little more honest now.” McCarthy said. “What do you mean, ‘be a little more honest?’ ” Stevens demanded, reddening. McCarthy ignored the question. McCarthy also hammered on another point: He proposed that the “pressure” charge against Carr be thrown out as “a vicious smear” since Stevens couldn’t quote anything Carr said to him by way of seeking favors for Schine. Going To Think Stevens asked for and got permission to “think overnight” before saying what charges he personally wants to press against Carr. But acting Chairman Mundt (R-SD) said the charges will stand at least until the end of the hearings. There woh’t be any “piecemeal” disposition of these charges Mundt declared. One new name came into the Inquiry — that of newspaper col umni.st George Sokolsky. Stevens named Sokolsky as the More on Hearings, Pg. g-B hitherto unidentified person reported to have hinted last February that if the Army gave liberal treatment to Schine. McCarthy w'ould tone down or maybe call off his Ft. Monmouth investigation. The Army secretary said this information was given him by Army counsel John G. Adams. Completely False In the day’s other major development, Stevens labelled “completely false” the McCarthy charge that he and associates tried^ through Schine to “blackmail” the subcommittee into dropping its Army probe. Stevens went on to deny, one after another, a series of McCarthy allegations against him, and did so after Sen. Jackson (D-Wash) told him somebody In this See STEVENS, Pg. ^A, Cols. 4-5 PRICE DAILY 5c, SUNDAY 10c3 Tornadoes Bombard Area leash Rains Kids Ready To Be Shot In Corpus By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS A bunch of second-graders in Corpus Christi are ready to get shot Wednesday in the interest of polio control. They will be the first Texans to take the first shots in the nationwide field tests on the salk polio vaccine. Plans were shaping up for the tests in eight other Texas counties. Originally, 10 Texas counties were chosen for the tests. However, San Antonio and Bexar County decided to drop out, temporarily at least. Corpus Christi expects to inocul-late about 4,000 second-graders. The tests were called off Sunday night after a case of paralytic polio was reported. But they were re-set Monday night after it was found the polio case was in adjacent Kleberg County. Vaccine supplies for Harris, Bexar, Nueces and Orange counties arrived last weekend. The state health department expects supplies for Dallas, McLennan, Taylor, Wichita and Tom Green counties to arrive Wednesday and for Tarrant County to arrive Friday. Dallas has scheduled its first; polio shots for May 5; Houston has set May 11. San Angelo, Waco, Abilene and Wichita Falls are awaiting the actual arrival of the vaccine before setting starting dates. Winds Unroof 4 Buildings At Rochesier More pictures on Pg. 2-B TRAVELING OUTHOUSE — Hap Smith, Rochester druggist, got quite a jolt when he looked up and saw a tin outhouse sailing about 30 feet over his head during the Rochester storm Tuesday. Smith was making a run for his car at the time. The outhouse landed up against ¿n old brick incinerator at the Farmers’ Gin lot. (Staff photo by David Barros) RAIN MAP SIS HURT Mother's Little Helper Starts Car; Oh Man! Three-year-old Mike Moore of 1^1 Woodard St. was just going to help his mother by starting the car for her Tuesday. Instead he: Drove the car through the garage door, over a lawn mower and up onto a washing machine in the garage. His sister, Ellen, 5, who was getting into the car, was thrown clear and badly bruised. Mrs. Earl K. Moore said Tuesday night she had to call a wrecker to get the car out of the garage. The garage door was lying on top of it. Mrs. Moore said Mike had carried her purse to the car for her. He apparently decided he was “going to start the car for me, not realizing that he couldn’t.” his mother said. That Mike is quite tho boy, his mother added. Rain, Rebels Hit French NEWS INDEX SICTION A Wemeii's News.........4 Oil...................é Sports..............•,    f SICTION I R«4ie A TV............3 IJjforiaU..............4 Comics...........  S Claiiifitd Ads 4« 7, 8 forai & Markat.........f HANOI. Indochina, April 27 (AV-Under pelting rains and despite heavy rebel mortar and artillery fire the French flung up new “last ditch” fortifications today in the heart of Dien Bien Phu. The long-awaited big seasonal monsoon rains turned the northwest Indochina fortress area into lakes of red mud and crippled French air strikes at the Communist-led Vietminh besiegers. Mazes of Fence But the French carved out more trenches and flung up thick mazes of barbed wire barricades in their main defense area, now reduced to a little less than a mile in diameter. They exchanged artillery blows with the Vietminh but there was no sign as yet of any mass rebel infantry assault. One French patrol struck out from a southern strongpoint three miles away from the main defense complex and managed to destroy a long string of rebel trenches. For the French the task was to tighten the defense bulwark as much as possible. All around the main defense area the Vietminh were chipping slowly away at key spots. 'The French operational headquarters of Brig. Gen. Christian de Castries were less than 600 yards from advanced positions of strong Vietminh forces. On the rim of the fortress the Vietminh set up more machine gun nests and nnti-aircraft batteries to try to shoot down the planes which parachute men and material Into the fortress. As long as the narrow “dropping zone” is held in the heart of tte fortress it can go on living and resisting. But a fresh big push from any of the encircllhg points held by the Vietminh couid put them virtually in the dropping area. If that happens the lifeline of the fortress would be gone and the final chapter would be written in bloody hand-to-hand combat. ABILENE Municipal    Airport ...........30 1889 South    8th ...............80 909 Hickory    St................73 1450 Clinton    St................5.5 2225 Edgemont ...............55 2232 Walnut St................55 2418 N. 18th .................65 857 EN 13th...................61 Aspermont .....................19 Baird...........................05 Ballinger ......................40 Big Spring .................... Tr Breckenridge...................27 Bronte.........................2.00 Brady ..........................70 Cisco ...........................60 Clyde...........................35 Colorado City..................1.37 Cross Plains ...................25 Crews .........................1.50 Fluvanna.......................30 Hamlin .........................28 Hermleigh .....................40 Hobbs ...........................50 Lueders ........................40 Merkel .........................25 Miles ..........................1.00 Munday .......................1.13 Neindr .........................45 Norton ........................l.]8 Rising Star.....................50 Robert Lee ...................1.7 Roby ...........................30 Rochester .....................l.oo Rotan ..........................30 San Angelo.....................04 Snyder .........................30 Sylvester .......................50 Weinert ........................41 Winters ........................70 Wylie...........................45 CONFUSION REIGNS Rochester Folk Go Underground By STAFF WRITER ROCHESTER. April 27 — Just about everyone in Rochester spent most of the afternoon Tuesday in a storm cellar. T. R. (Hap) Smith was one of those who couldn’t make it when he saw the storm coming. Hap, who is a druggist, Red Cross chairman, «county hospital board member and one of the town’s top citizens, was on a mission of mercy when the storm hit. He had gone to a migrant labor barracks at Farmers’ Gin (north part of town) to make arrangements for Mrs. Nicanora Gonzales who is gravely ill with tubercu losis, to be hospitalized. Rochester fire sirens began screaming a warning as the cloud approached. “I hated to leave that sick worn an alone in a storm,” Hap said. He stayed until he thought the worst was over. Then, he made run for his car which was parked nearby. “Two two-hy-fours landed about that time in front of my car. “I looked up, and sailing over my head about 30 feet in the air was an outhouse!” The building in which the ill woman lives was not hurt. in pipe burst during the storm the Rochester Reporter office. Dale Graham, publisher - edi tor of the paper, said water ruined about $30 worth of supplies and left his office a mess. Somehow — thanks to wind or more probably lightning — a water WOOL BOOSTED Administration Wins Farm Vote WASHINGTON. April 27 (^Pl-The Senate passed a bill today provid ing for government paj-ments to encourage domestic wool production, but refused to tack on to it an amendment to support major crops at 90 per cent of parity for another year. Both votes were victories for the Eisenhower administration. 'The wool program, approved 69-17, had full administration support. But Secretary of Agriculture Benson wants a lower, more flexible system of farm crop supports after the present law expires at the end of the year. Under the wool bill, domestic growers would sell their wool for whatever the market would bring. The secretary of agriculture then could make special incentive or production payments to expand wool production and increase the income of the growers. These payments would be made from 70 per cent of the duties col- lected on foreign wool imports, making about 30 million dollars a year available for the program. The special payments plan aims at ending storage of large stocks of home-grown wool in government warehouses under a previous loan program while large foreign wool imports were consumed in this country. The measure now goes to the House, where its fate is uncertain in view of strong sentiment there for a one package support bill instead of special treatment for the wool growing industry. After defeating 48-40 the move to extend high price supports another year, and before taking a final vote on the wool bill, the Senate: Rejected 80-32 an amendment by Sen. Humphrey (D-Minn) to cancel the recent 15 per cent cutback in price supports for butter, cheese and o)her dairy products, and to hold future cutbacks to 5 per cent a year. Graham figured in some success ful fire - fighting Tuesday after noon when some enthusiastic "vol unteers” couldn’t work the regu lar fire-fighting equipment. Just as flying debris cut power lines nearby, fire broke out in the rear of J. M, Stockton grocery. Confusion was pretty great in Rochester about this time. Some high school youngsters went into action. They manned the fire truck and got it to the grocery. But, they couldn’t manage the hose. While others were connecting a garden hose to get water to put on the fire, Graham grabbed an empty syrup bucket and began scooping up muddy water from a puddle near the store’s back door. The syrup bucket and the garden hose did the job. Fire damage A« as slight. By KATHARYN DUFF Reporter-News State Editor ROCHESTER. April 27 - A storm which “looked like a tornado that didn’t quite touch the ground” swept over Rochester about 4 p.m. Tuesday. It unroofed at least four buildings, damaged roofs on dozens, uprooted trees, demolished a barn and scooted two migrant labor barracks along the ground. It also threw a large scare into the town which remembers well the death and damage of a tornado 13 months ago brought to neighbors in O’Brien and Knox City. No one was injured in Rochester’s storm Tuesday. Damage was estimated in the thousands of dollars. Pounding Rain The storm brought with it a pounding one-inch rain. The rain was dumped on the town within 15 or 20 minutes. There was a pepper of small hail. Sam Loftis, garage mechanic, said he watched a funnel formation which dropped out of the green and black cloud dip nearly to the ground and pick off roofs in the western part of the town. Dale Graham, Rochester Reporter publisher-editor, said evidence around town was that It was a twister - type cloud which stayed above the level of the ground. Giant trees tom up by the roots and damage to buildings pointed to great suction force in the wind. The damage was scattered about the town. In some sections television antenna were still upright. In others they were bent over like tired old folks. A row of buildings on the western edge of the community showed great damage. Roof Shaved Off The roof of Mrs. Florence Burleson’s home was shaved off clean and dumped about 250 yards to the north and east. Mrs. Burleson and her daughter, Ekla Fay Rochester^ Ballinger Hit By DON NORRIS Three tornadoes dipped into West Central Texas Tuesday. In their wake they left wide-spread rains and some damage at Rochester and Ballinger. The third twister, or possibly two small ones, dipped to earth about 1:15 p.m. in cultivated fields near Big Spring. No casualties or injuries were reported from the twisters. Officials of the Weather Bureau at Abilene Municipal Airport said the turbulent conditions in West Texas were caused by a squall line. The scjuall developed from south of Big Spring across to Colora(io City and on into Sweetwater. The Weather Bureau at New Orleans had issued tornado warning about 3 p. m. C. E. Set ROCHESTER, Pg. ^A, Col. 1 Sitchler, chief meteorologist at the Abilene Weather Bureau, issued a severe weather warning for the Abilene area about 5 p. m. Sitchler said th« possibility of tornadoes in this area passed with the squall line about 7:30 p.m. High winds accompanied most of the rain. At Ballinge»* a small tornado hit the north side of the Runnels County city, lifted up and then created a sand storm on the south portion. Home Unroofed The twister hit on the northside of Ballinger about 5 p.m. It tore the roof off the Henry Stokes home on Second Ave., broke out numerous windows, and blew down tele vision aerials. When it struck again on the south side of town it blew off a metal roof, uprooted trees, blew down signs, tipp^ over a garage on Eighth St., and then swirled up loose sand. In its wake the tornado left .41 inch of rain at Ballinger. The twister at Rochester hit about 4 p.m. It unroofed an implement company, unroofed about four buildings and damaged a great many more. Rain there was one inch. Hail Covers Highway In the southwest part of Runnels County at Norton, small hailstones fell in enough quanlty to cover the highway from 4 until 8 p.m. Winds and murky skies drove residents of the area into cellars. In Abilene rainfall ranged from .30 of an inch at Abilene Municipal Airport to .73 inch at 909 Hickory St. A fall of .61 was reported at 857 EN 13th St., .65 at 2418 North 18th St., .55 at 2225 Edgemont on the south, and .55 at 1450 Clinton St., on the north side. After forming near Big Spring the squall line moved in a northeasterly direction. With it came the three tornadoes, wind and rain. 1.37 at Colorado City Colorado City received 1.37 inches along with light hail. Over an inch fell in the Munday area, wiUi wind blowing foliage off trees and tipping over television antennas. When the murky skies enveloped Snyder about 2:30 p.m. anximia See TORNADOES, Pg. g-A, Cel. t Radar Shows Storm; Area Cities Alerted The storm 'Tuesday cancelled one major event in Rochester. It caused the Rochester High School hand to call off its spring concert. Churchill Cheered hi He Refuses Troop Commitment LONDON, April 27 (4V-Prime Minister Churchill refused today to commit British troops now to Indochina. He held out the hope that the Geneva conference will arrange a cease fire in that troubled land. Waves of cheers echoed through the House of Commons when Churchill—gripping the dispatch box before him—slowly and carefully said: Her Majesty’s government are not prepared to give any undertakings about United Kingdom military action in Indochina in advance of the results of Geneva. We have not entered into any new political or military commitments." Churchill gave his government plenty of maneuvering room both at the 19-nation Geneva conference on Asian problems and afterward. He said his Cabinet has the fullest confidence in the course it has agreed Foreign Secretary Anthony Eden ‘’should follow in circumstances so largely governed by the unknown.** A LONG STEP — “Unde” Luke Martin who was for 27 years Rochester’s nightwatchman ‘rode” several feet during the Tuesday storm. He lives in a barracks on the Paymaster Gin lot. The house was scooted off concrete blocks by the wind. Uncle Luke is standing on his door sill and front step. Before the wind the ftep was against the house. (Staff photo by David Barros) Recently installed radar equipment at the Weather Bureau at Municipal Airport was used to keep area towns alerted as possible tornado conditions neared Tuesday night. C. E. Sitchler, chief meteorologist, said close check was kept on the squall line from the time It formed until after it had moved northeastward out of this area. Weatherman said the turbulent conditions were caused by a low pressure trough which collided with cool air aloft and moisture below. Sitchler said he issued the severe warning for this area about p. m. after the New Orleans warning came out earlier. Sitchler said Hamlin was warned that it was in the squall line’a path, also Munday, and a Stam-fo»tl radio station. He said the squall area formed long white line on the radar scope about 20 to 30 miles wide. It extended from San Angelo to the vicinity of Wichita Falls. It moved through Abilene about 7:30 p. m. Tueeday. At 10:15 p. m. was on a line between Camp Hood and Dallas, he said. THE WEATHER . s. DErASTHENT OF COM.WBSCB WEATHEB aUREAtr ABILENE AND VICINITY — ParUy cloudy asd warm Wadnaaday and Thnra-day war poaalbJ« aftamooa or avaning ■howars boUt days. High tampcratur« botA day» ao. Low Wedneaday night about M. NORTH CENTRAL TEXAS:    Partly cloudy and warm WedaMday and Thuri-<Uyj widaly scattarad thuadartbowara Wadnaaday aftamooa. WEST TEXAS: Partly ckwdy wttb widaly acatterad thuadartbowara la Paabaadia Wadnaaday aad Thursday coolar la Paa-handle Tburaday altaraeoa. EAST AND SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS: Partly cloudy aad warm Wadnaaday aad Tburaday 2 widaly acattarad aftaraooa abowart Wodneadaya modarata Is fraab aouthaaM and aouth winds oa the eaaat. YEMPBSATl'aES Tuaa.-A. M.    Tuaa.-P.    M. ft ............ ije    ............ m f  .......... I:»    ............ rr f ............ 3:»    ............ n •• ............ 4:30    ............ n •• ............ 3:3#    ............ M 2 ............ •:»    ............ SS 2  » «1 2 ............ •:30    ............ M 2    •« n ............lOiSi    ............ — n ............ 11:3»    ............ — w ............ 13:3»    ............ — High »ad law temparataraa tor M boan eadad at 1:30 p.m.: 01 aad 3». Htgb and low tamparataraa aama data Uat yaar: M aad S4. SuaMt laat alght T.IT p.m. Suartoa today 9;SS a.m. Suaaat tooigbt T:U pja. Baromatar raadlag at 0:30 p.ai. «.14, Ralaitva bumMl^ at 1:30 s.ai. ft fw ;

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