Abilene Reporter News, April 13, 1954

Abilene Reporter News

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Location: Abilene, Texas

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Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - April 13, 1954, Abilene, Texas DRIZZLE / — ^€í)t Abilene Reporter -Bcütë MD™E"WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES"—ByronVOL. LXXIII, No. 301    AuocUued    Preu (AP) ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY    MORNING.    APRIL    13,    1954—EIGHTEEN PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS_ PRICE    DAILY    5c,    SUNDAY    10c Sfate Senate Kills Giant School Board Rejects ON TRIAL FOR FRAUD—William Estep (left) on trial in U.S. District Court, poses for a photo with his attorney, Maury Hughes of Dallas. Estep is charged with using the mails to defraud and violation of U.S. Security Act of 1933. The charges are based on a company he organized to manufacture an engine that would need no fuel. (Staff Photo by Don Hutcheson) Witnesses Tell Part in Estep’s Atomotor Firm By GEORGIA NELSON Three government witnesses told Monday afternoon in U.S. District Court of the part they played in William Estep's Atomotor Manufacturing Co. One of the witnesses said she invested $5,000 in the company and has since sued Estep to recover her money. Estep is on trial on charges of using the mails to defraud and violation of Security Exchange Commission regulations. He pleaded not guilty. A 10-count indictment returned against him in Dallas in January alleges that he used I    ‘ the U.S. mails to sell stock in paid him in cash for 5,000 shares a company which he said would stock in the company. She testi- manufacture a “fuel-less, self-energizing'’ engine. Introduction in evidence of a copy of the Atomotor Manufacturing Company’s charter revealed that the incorporators were Estep, Joe Burkett, prominent San Antonio attorney, and Mrs. Leta Paet-znick of San Antonio. Former Legislator Burkett is the brother and father of two members of the Texas legislature, Omar Burkett of Eastland and Joe Burkett, Jr., of Kerr-ville. lie is a former district clerk and county judge of Eastland County, former member of the Texas House and Senate and of the Texas Highway Commission. Mrs. Paetzniek was named in the charter application as secretary of the corporation and Estep as treasurer. A list of stockholders in the corporation included the names of 47 Abilenians and six others from Hawley, Cisco, Weatherford and San Angelo. Mrs. Muriel Merrit of San Antonio told indignantly of repeated demands she made to Estep that he return to her $5,000 which she 1 See WITNESSES, Money Bills AUSTIN, April 12 Lfl—More than a dozen bills that would have appropriated nearly two million dollars were killed in the Senate today on a single issue. The senators refused 13-11 to suspend a rule which held the bills trapped on the eve of the special session's final adjournment. Sen. Jimmy Phillips, Angleton, had invoked the rule that permits any senator to “tag” any bill for a mandatory public hearing and 48-hour notice, applying it to every appropriation bill passed by the House since the session’s major business was completed last week. Sen. A. M. Aikin Jr., Paris, called on the Senate to suspend the rule, contending similar measures introduced in the Senate had already had public hearing last Saturday night. The test vote was called on one of the many “tagged” bills — a measure that would have appropriated $644.000 for junior colleges. Aikin’s motion set off another flare-up of tempers. Aikin told the Senate his motion was not debatable when Phillips attempted to argue against it. “The senator from Lamar has been unwilling to let the light shine on anything that’s been done in this session,” Phillips retorted. Aikin whirled from his front row desk and made his way through the intervening desks. “That’s not true, senator,” he snapped as he went. “That’s not true and I’ve had just about enough of it.” Sen. Ottis Lock, Lufkin, stepped between the two as Lt. Gov. Ben Ramsey, presiding, rapped for order and the sergeant-at-arms. Phillips asked for permission to speak on personal privilege, declaring, “My feelings have been hurt.” Phillips told the senators “nothing but bones” were left after the major appropriations urged by Gov. Shivers had been taken care of. He argued there was not money enough left in the treasury to pay even for the junior college bill. Aikin apologized to Phillips. “I’m sorry I lost my temper,” he said. Caught by the rule were measures to provide money for a supervised parole program, new buildings for the Waco State Home, work of the Water Resources Committee, work of the Texas Commission on Alcoholism and numerous other projects. Shopping Center Plan PROBE SLATED FHA Under Fire As Boss Resigns THE WEATHER U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE WEATHER BUREAU ABILENE AND VICINITY — Cloudy with drizzle Tuesday morning, partly cloudy Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday. fied that she sued Estep and obtained a judgment for $5.000 but that he ha., since restored to her    ,0    Lo. only $1,500. When U. S. District Attorney Heard L. Floore asked her if she had made efforts to get her money back Mrs. Merrit asserted, “A thousand times!” Operates Hospital Mrs. Merrit said she operates a 110-bed hospital in San Antonio and that Mrs. Paetzniek sometimes worked for her. Mrs. Merrit testified that when Estep induced her to pay him $5,-000 he told her there were only a few shares of stock available in the company. She said he told her he had paid $5,000 of his own funds to Samuel G. House of Abilene for the patent on the fuel-less motor and that it was already in production at Texas Engineering & Manufacturing Co. at Grand Prairie. Estep told her, she testified, that “big automobile manufacturers are clamoring for franchises on the motor.” Mrs. Paetzniek testified that she Tuesday mght 50. High Wednesday 80. NORTH CENTRAL AND WEST TEXAS: Mostly cloudy with scattered showers and local thunderstorms and slightly warmer Tuesday: W’ednesday. partly cloudy and warm with widely scattered afternoon thundershowers. EAST AND SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS Mostly cloudy with scattered showers and local thunderstorms, mainly In north Tuesday: Wednesday, partly cloudy with widely scattered, mostly afternoon, thundershowers; no Important temperature changes: moderate to fresh east to southeast winds on the coast. TEMPERATURES Mon ■ 60 Mon P. M 63 64 64 62 62 62 60 59 59 Pg. 9-A, Col. 4 A M. ............ 1 30 ............ 2 30 ........... 3:30 ............ 4 30 ............ 5:30 ........... 6:30 ............ 7:30 ........... 8:30 ........... 9:30 59 ............ 10:30    ............ — «0 ............ 11:30    ............ — 60 ............ 12:30    ............ — High and low temperatures for 24 hours ended at 6:30 p.m.: 65 and 56. High and low temperatures same date last year: 61 and 49. Sunset last night 7:06 pm. Sunrise today 6:14 a m. Sunset tonight 7:06 p.m. Barometer reading at 9:30 p.m. 28 42 Relative humdity at 9:30 p.m. 92 per cent. WASHINGTON, April 12 UPf—The administration cracked down on the Federal Housing Administration today, letting its boss resign but forecasting a number of dismissals and possibly some criminal prosecutions. President Eisenhower accepted the resignation of FHA Commissioner Guy T, O. Hoilyday. That announcement set off a round of disclosures of alleged “fleecing” of householders by home repair crews and profiteering by apartment house promoters. But Hollyday’s resignation was handed in, the White House said, to permit the Federal Bureau of Investigation and Hollyday’s chief, Housing and Home Finance Administrator Albert M. Cole, a free hand to investigate the agency. Cole told reporters he considers Hoilyday, 6t-year-old former mortgage banker from Baltimore, a “good Christian gentleman.” He may nevertheless be blamable, Cole said, because he apparently “was aware of it (the alleged prevalence of abuses) and did not act.” Eisenhower ordered FHA’s records seized and impounded by Cole. The latter announced the launching of a two-pronged investigation —one inquiry into “irregularities” in FHA. another into possible criminal violations, to be undertaken by the FBI. Cole, who as head of the Housing and Home Finance Agency supervises FHA operations, ordered withdrawal of the acceptance of the resignation last year of a second official—Clyde L. Powell, assistant FHA commissioner for rental housing. Cole said he wanted to keep Powell in the government service until “it can be determined whether he is personally responsible for what I deem very negligent operation of the program.” Powell is from St. Louis, Mo. Fourteen senior officials of the FHA will find their conduct under scrutiny, Cole told a news conference. He said “numerous” of them will lose their jobs, but not all. Cole issued a statement saying there have been: 1. Alleged “serious irregularities and abuses” in the home moderni zation and repair program, whereby some home owners have been charged twice the value of repair jobs and in some cases obtained “shoddy” work to boot. 2. Evidence of “illegal or unethical actions” in the financing of FHA-insured apartment projects under “Title 608,” the so-called middle-income rental housing program which expired in 1950. The housing chief said investigation has turned up 251 cases In which FHA insured mortgages on apartment houses exceeded the actual cost of the projects. Vote Taken After Henson Leaves The Abilene School Board Monday night voted unanimously to recommend that the City Commission deny Arthel Henson’s plan to build a shopping center just west of the new high school in West Abilene. Specifically, the board recommended that no property just west of the school be annexed in Zone F (Ircal retail). This virtually assured a stormy City Commission meeting for next Fridav. when the shopping center issue is to be considered by that body. The mat- DR. OPPENHEIMER . . . face* probe (See story, bottom P. I-A) AT GAP CREEK Man Narrowly Escapes As Flood Sweeps Away Car WINTERS, April 12. (RNS> — A six - second margin saved the life of a Brownwood man in a flood near here early Monday. That was the short space of time which separated Ruel Crow, engineer for the Santa Fe railroad, from a watery grave at 12.45 a.m. when his 1951 Nash stalled on a Gap Creek culvert eight and one-half miles east of Winters on Farm-to-Market Road 53. After hard rains had reduced Crow’s head - light visibility to zero, a wall of water pushed so hard agaiust the upstream side of his car (the driver’s side) that Crow couldn’t open his door. His wife and another passenger, T. M. Martin, Santa Fe fireman from Brownwood, got out of the auto on the downstream side. Mrs NEWS INDEX SECTION A Women's news . . . 4-5 Sports .......... Oil news........ SECTION B Editorials ....... . . 2 . . 3 Farm news ...... • • • • .. 7 Rodio it TV log . 8 Crow screamed to her husband to hurry. The surging, muddy waters swept the car off the culvert as soon as Crow got out, the trio said. High ground was reached when the trio formed a chain with their hands and waded through waist deep water. The battered Nash was found at 3 p.m. Monday by Clarence Ham-bright, Winters farmer, about 400 yards downstream from the culvert. When the auto was pulled out &t 5 p.m., the top was caved In, the front was crushed, and several inches of mud was on the seats. Searchers, including an airplane spotter, had hunted for the vehicle since morning. The trio had been en route to Brownwood from Sweetwater, Vhere Crow worked on relief duty during the week end. The Crows had been returning to Brownwood with groceries and a clothing sup- piy. After escaping from the auto, the trio was taken to Winters by two unidentified oil firm employes, who were checking the safety of oil rig men. Several other autos in recent years have been washed into Gap Creek at the same culvert. The most recent incident occurred last September. Rain Will Follow Heavy Rain-Maybe SUSPENDED BY AEC Famed Atomic Physicist Faces U. S. Security Charges NEW YORK, April 12 (/P)—The New York Times says famed physicist Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, who directed the making of the first atomic bomb, has been suspended on security grounds by the Atomic Energy Commission. A panel of the commission’s Personnel Security Board, headed by Gordon Gray, president of the Univesity of North Carolina and former secretary of the Army, started hearings on the case today, the Times said. Meanwhile, the dispatch by J^mes Reston from Washington says Oppenheimer has been denied access to all government security documents. Oppenheimer directed the atomic bomb project at Los Alamos, N.M., during World War II. He Is one of the world’s foremost atomic physicists. The Times story said most of the principal charges against Oppenheimer, 50. have been reviewed by the Atomic Energy Commission, the White House and the Departments of JusUce. State and Defense over a period of 12 years. The newspaper said the main charges are that he: 1. Associated frequently with Communists in the early 1940s, including his brother Frank and Frank’s wife; that he fell in love with one Commmr.ist and married a former Communist and that he contributed generously to Communist causes from 1940 to April of 3942.    ,    . I. Hired Communists or former Communists at Los Alamos. 3. Gave cdntradictory testimony to the FBI about attendance at Communist meetings in the early 1940s. 4. Rejected as “traitorous” an attempt by an alleged Communist to get scientific information from SWEETIE PIE” She is a concentrated little bundle of energy and mischief that will odd sparkle to the morning edition of The Report-er-News, in which she will make her debut April 19. You'll find mony o chuckle in this new cartoon panel. him for the Soviet Union, but failed to report the incident to the government’s security officers for many months. 5. Strongly opposed development of the hydrogen bomb in 1949 when he was chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission’s General Advisory Committee, and lobbied against it, even after former President Harry Truman ordered the AEC to proceed with the project. Oppenheimer, described as a sensitive, soft-spoken man, has admitted association with various Communists in the late 1930s and early 1940s. He has flatly denied, however, that he was a member of the Communist party. He lives with his wife and two small children on the grounds of the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, N.J. He is a director of the institute. In addition to his work at Princeton, he was, until his suspension, a member of President Eisenhower’s Science Advisory Committee and consultant to the Atomic Energy Commission. He was also adviser to the Departments of State, Defense and the National Security Council on armaments and their regulation, continental defense, civil defense and the use of atomic weapons in support of ground combat. Cloudy with drizzle Tuesday morning was the U. S. Weather Bureau’s prediction for Abilene and vicinity after good rains fell here and throughout West Texas during the past two days. Light mist and sprinkles were reported falling at scattered points in the area Monday night. The heavy rains boosted lake water supplies and were a boon to farmers and ranchers. A forecaster said partly cloudy weather would continue Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday. High temperature Tuesday will be 70 degrees and the high Wednesday 80. Water Pumped City pumps on the Clear Fork of the Brazos River had pumped 29 million gallons of water into Phantom Hill Lake by 7 o’clock Monday night, Curtis Harlin, water and sewer superintendent, reported. Two pumps were put into operation at noon. By mid-afternoon the lake had risen about two tenths of a foot. Elm creek was flowing a little less than half full into the lake. Lake Kirby caught about 3 inches up to 4 p.m. A lakekeeper told Harlin after driving over the watershed that it looked like that would be about all the lake would get until more rain falls. Lake Abilene caught about 2 inches. Harlin said that Abilene had about 13‘i* billion gallons of water stored in its three lakes before the rain Monday. Based on average evaporation and present consumption, this would last an estimated two and a half years. Over Spillway Water was running over the spillway at Lake Daniel near Brecken-ridge. The lake caught 2.20 of an inch and Breckenridge got 3.20. Sweetwater’s Oak Creek Reservoir was up from four to five feet at mid-morning and water was still running in. Kaiser Creek and Oak Creek, both of which flow into the lake, were bankful at 10 a.m. City officials estimated they had already gained 4,371 acre feet of water. Lake Baird overflowed and wat- Weather, rescue pictures on Page 1-B er was backed up over the local road to Admiral. Water was two feet deep over the bridge near Admiral. Lake Seilers that supplies wrater to Aspermont rose 10 inches. Mist and sprinkles were reported at Aspermont, Haskell and Seymour Monday night. A total of 2.59 of an inch a rain had fallen at Sey mour and similar rains were general over Baylor County. The rains are life - savers for farmers and ranchers. It’» a question yet whether the moisture came in time to save the wheat crop. Most areas reported the bulk of the wheat crop is lost, hut rain will rescue some. The rain meant moisture for planting cotton and feed. The official measurement at Abilene was 2.00 but up to 2.65 was reported at 2225 Edgtmont Dr. ter was placed on the city agenda at the last commission session last Friday. Most school board members indi-ciated they will voice their opinions in person. All board members were present, except Mrs. George Swinnev, secretary. The motion was made by Morgan Jones, Jr., vice president, and seconded hv Roy Skaggs. The shopping center motion was made shortly before midnight, long after Henson and two associates had handed the board an architect’s sketch and had left the meeting. Earlier, Skaggs had sought positive action, such as recommending that the board ask the City Commission to annex the property as Zone A (one family residential) — the most restricted zone possible. When Skaggs asked what would happen if a developer put up a shopping center outside the city limits, W. E. Fraley, board president, replied that a developer couldn’t afford to do that due to the prohibitive cost of water and sewer facilities. Prior to the vote, OUie McMinn. • board member, said, “We might as well have bought a piece of property for the high school ott Pine St. lt would have been just as busy (If the shopping center is apD roved)." Henson proposes to erect the shopping center on the west side of North Mockingbird Lane between North Sixth and State Sts. The new high school is being constructed on the east side of North Mockingbird Lane. It is just north of North Sixth St. Principal difference between Henson’s latest plan and previous ones which have been rejected by the zoning board and city commission is location of the buildings and a buffer zone. The developer now wants to put the buildings for retail use on the w'est side of the area. Before plans were to place them immediately on North Mockingbird Lane. Last Monday night the planning commission approved a plat of the area. It okayed a site 260 feet wide and 1,374 feet long on the west side of the street as Zone B (two - family residence). Henson says he plans to use this area as a parking lot for the stores. The remaining 150 feet of the area was approved as Zone F (local retail). That is where the stores, offices and probably a gasoline station would be located. Henson says the nearest shop ping center building would be about 770 feet away from the high school academic building. The school gymnasium and auditorium would be about 475 away. 80-Foot Buffer Zone On the side of the shopping area’s parking lot towards the zone. Henson had offered Monday night to leave it to the School Saa SCHOOL, Page 9-A, Col. 2 WHERE II RAINED ABILENE Municipal Airport ......... 2.00 909 Hickory ................ 2 94 2225 Edgemont ............ 2.65 1829 South 8th ............. 2.50 2418 North 18th ............ 2.15 857 EN 13th ................ 1.55 2233 Walnut ............... 2,80 1450 Clinton ...............2.40 LAKE ABILENE .......... 2:00 ALBANY .................... 175 ANSON ..................... 1.80 ASPERMONT............... 1.97 BAIRD .................... 480 BALLINGER ................ 6.21 BIG SPRING ................ 2.00 BLACKWELL ............... 3.75 BRECKENRIDGE...........3.29 BRONTE ................... 2.05 BUFFALO GAP..............2.50 CAPS ........................ 1.80 CISCO ....................... 3.00 CLAYTONVILLE ............ 2.59 CLYDE ..................... 3.40 COLEMAN .................. 3.50 Hortl’s Creek Lake ........ 2.57 COLOR AIK) CITY .........2.10 CROSS PLAINS ............. 3.00 EDEN .......................65 EASTLAND.................2.50 FUNSTON .................. 160 GORMAN .................... 4.50 HAMLIN ..................... 150 HASKELL...................1.85 HERMLEIGH ................ 1.70 KNOX CITY..................1.50 LAWN ....................... 2 10 LUEDERS ................. 2.90 MATADOR .................. 2.19 MILES ................ 4.70    - 7.50 MENARD .................... 0.35 MERKEL ................... 1.85 MEMPHIS ....................0.85 MIDLAND ................... 1.20 MORAN ................ 2    - plus MCCAMEY .................. 1.00 MUNDAY ................... 2.19 NORTON ................... 200 OPLIN ...................... 4.50 OVALO.......................2.90 PADUCAii .................. 1.75 PUTNAM.....................2 75 RADIUM .................... 1.50 RANKIN .................... 3 25 RISING STAR ................3 25 ROBERT LEE .............. 4.70 ROBY ........................2 30 ROTAN ......................3.00 ROSCOE .................... Ifc5 ROWENA ................. 425 RULE .......................f,00 SAN ANGELO ........ 1.36    . 2.10 6 Mile East ............ 3 ¿5 SEYMOUR ............... ’ 2 59 STERLING ................*    300 SNYDER .................. 170 SONORA .................... 1 25 STAMFORD ............ o 93 STANTON ......  ¡15 SWEETWATER .............. 1.70 TALPA ...................... 3 00 THROCKMORTON .......... 100 TUSCOLA ................... 2.00 VALERA .................... 2.00 VIEW ........................ 1.70 WEINERT  .............. 1.75 WINTERS................ 2-3.50 A LITTLE WET FOR AUTOS—Three men from Baird cross    result of welcome rains Sunday    night and Monday. Left to a bridge on a rural road near Baird Lake Monday but in a    right are Col. Dyer Jr., Earl    Blakely and Roy Biakeiy. boat instead of a car. The water was two feet deep as a    (Staff Photo by Don Hutcheson) ;

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