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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: January 7, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - January 7, 1954, Abilene, Texas                               PARTLY CLOUDY "vt, A mtitw OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES" Byron FINAL :VOL. LXXIII, No. 205 Frat (AH ABILENE, TEXAS, THURSDAY EVENING, JANUARY 7, PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS PRICE DAIJ.Y Se. SUNDAY Ite ONE CANDLE IS ENOUGH Sam Rayburn of Bonham, House minoritv leader and top House Democrat, needs only one candle on the cake to prove he'was 72 Wednesday. The tirthday came right along with the re-convening of the 83rd Bill to Hike Cotton Acreage WASHINGTON bill hiking .the 1954 national cotton acreage allotment to acres was approved today by the Senate Agriculture Committee. Chairman Aikea (R-Vt) said the measure will be rushed to the Senate fdr consideration Monday and that it will be substituted on of the Senate for passed year by 'v wSalir" the effect of sending' the measure to a House- conference committee as Rjie: Senar? The bill provides for a base Acreage of 21 million acres, .plus Poll Tax Payment Pace Up Slightly A total of Taylor Countj- residents had indicated their in- tentions of voting this ye'ar when the county tax collector's office closed Wednesday. That was the number of poll taxes that have been paid since Oct. 1 last year. Rate of payment of poll -taxes has speeded up slightly since the first of the year, with 265 paid from Jan. 1 through 6. From Oct.j 1 through. Dec. 31, 1953. the tax collector's office is- sued 922 exemption certificates, Bringing the county's voting strength so far for this year to 3.173. Warm Weather May Leave by Weekend First hint that the warm weath- er of the past week may be leav- ing Abilene and vicinity came from the weatherman Thursday when he said a cold front early this weekend. The high Wednesday was 70 degrees, about" 10 degrees warmer than is normal for this time of year, and the forecast was for an- other high of 70 today. A year ago today the high and low was 70 and 36. comparing to within one degree of.Wednesday's high and low of 70 and 35. 315.000 acres as a national reserve, acres to., .and Arizona to keep'them from being cut more per cent from their 1952 cotiwT acreages and additional Stores to meet special htrrlship It also provides; in an individual Trnay- be the higher 65 'per cent .ot tnV'.'aye'rage planted to 'cotton the years or per cent of the highest area planted to cotton in any one of. those However, no cotton'-allotment can be higher thanoSO'per cent of-the total cropland in the :farm; Under another proviso a-.farmer who doesn't use any or all.of his allotment this year may surrender the unused portion to the county committee for re-allocation "in the county. County conimittees like-, wise may surrender unused-alloca- tions to the state committees. Ike Sees Prosperity, Taxes Cut. Atom-Geared Defense AMBASSADOR WARNS Italian Communist Strength Rising WASHINGTON Clare Boothe Luce has cautioned top officials here there is new danger, in Italy of slowly rising Communist strength, it was learned today. Mrs. Luce, who conferred yes- terday with President Eisenhower, is reported to be urging continued American economic and military aid to Italy to bolster its pro-West- ern government. Neither airs. Luce nor the Presi- dent, reliable sources said, be- lieves there is any imminent threat that Italy's already power- ful Communist party can seize power. Can Bs Solved The ambassador is confident, it is said, that the current political crisis caused, by Italian premier Giuseppe Pella's -resignation can be solved quickly without playing into Communist hands. However, sne is reported con- cerned about the long range threat posed to Italian democracy by the new. non-violent tactics adopted by Italys' Beds. By exploiting Italy's serious :ua- employment problem and pressurr ing non-Communist unions to co- operate in strikes, the Red leaders are reported to have gained added influence and prestige in Italy dur- ing the past year.. This opens up the grim possibil- ity.' she is said to-fear, that the Communists might actually be able'to take.over the country in a ryear if there is an unex- pected worsening of Italy's eco- nomic plight-" demonstration of American support for Italy's present govern- ment, the State Department late yesterday announced it was draft- ing "a substantial program" of de- fense orders for Italian .factories as well as a plan for.limited eco- nomic-aid. Figures. Not Disclosed No specific figures were dis- closed. But responsible informants said the combined program would total about 300 million dollars dar- ing the next six months. This would be some 40 million dollars less than Italy got during a similar period last year. Foreign aid specialists in the Ei- senhower administration believe (his amount should be sufficient for this fiscal year, provided follow-up program can be devised for the 12-month period beginning next July 1. Mrs. Luce. lias reported during her round of conferences here thai Russia is pouring millions of dol- lars into Italy to back up its dream of turning it Into a Communist state. 7 Killed, 7 Hurt as Navy Plane Crashes PANAMA, Panama Bl The flaming crash of a U.S. Navy photographic plane last night took the lives of seven men. One victim was dragged alive from the wreck- age and died today. Three of. the seven other sur- vivors were reported in critical condition. The four-engined bringing a photo reconnaissance platoon from Miramar, Calif., to the Canal Zone, -.vent down in. flames In jungle area near the Trajis-Isth mian highway; Capt, William A. Thorn, com minding officer at the Coco Solo -NaValTiase: the iUane had undershot by 2H miles destination near Colon, on the Caribbean side of the isthmus. He said Levi Anderson and James Hyatt, two farmers living near the crash areat did "heroic service" in dragging several of the injured men to safety from the flaming wreckage. The survivors were taken to Coco Solo Naval Hospital with severe burns. Names of the casualties .were withheld pending notification of next of kin. ARTICLES IN REPORTER-NEWS Scrapbooks for Civil Defense Clippings Go to City's Schools Several thousand serapbooks for Abilene homes are being delivered to the public schools this week, in which citizens are asked to paste a series of articles soon to be pub- lished in The Reporter-News." That was announced Thursday by Harry Dobbyn, 5eneral chair- man of Abilene's civil defense and disaster emergency relief organiza- tion. The articles will contain valuable information on what to do and what not to do in case a disaster oilier natural phenome- non or warfare strikes Abilene. Dobbyn said. They will begin, in the Sunday, Jan. 24, Abilene'Reporter News and continue for. flboiit 20 to 25 Sundays. All will. be in Sunday issues. Scrapbooks will be available to all school children at 25 cents each. They also may be obtained by persons who don't have'1'- school children. Such an individual should get a neighbor school.child to pick TOWNS URGED TO CUR SERIES Outlying towns of this .area were urged Thursday to clip out and save the series of civil defense and disaster relief arti- cles which The Reporter-News will begin publishing Jan 24-in Sunday issues. Harry Dobbyn, chairman of Abilene's civil defense and dis- aster set-up, said the informa- tion will be very helpful to other communities who desire to organize for relief of disas- ters. Abilenians will put the ma- terial into scrapbooks. up a scrap book for him or should go to any of the public schools and get one for himself. Price is 25 cents. The scrapbooks have hard cov- Timing Unsettled For U S -Red Talk WASHINGTON United States and Russia were agreed to- day on starting preliminary atoms- for-pcace talks in Washington, but the important question- ol timing was still up in the air. The Soviets announced the agree- ment last night In Moscow and the State Department quickly con- firmed it. Russia said its ambassador In Georgi M. Zarubln, would represent it at the talks to set a time, place ami subject mat- ter for full scale negotiations. No date was mentioned. The State an hour, announced Secretary Dulles "proceed at an early date lo lnvc the procedural conversa- tions." That was another goad to the Soviets to gel the talks going. Time Is short for Dulles, who U expected lo leave two weeks from today for Berlin and the Foreign Ministers Conference, there Jan. 25 tmoni United States, Ruuli, Britain and France. Dulles has been pressing for early negotiations ever since Presi- dent Eisenhower proposed. In his Dec. 8 address to Na- tions, that the world.unite to strip the. atom'.of "It's'military casing and adapt it to the arts of peace." the Eisenhower plan, atomic .materials and know-how would be pooled for peaceful pur- poses by the United States, UussU and other nations with .a contribu- tion to make. 'An International agency, under United Nations aus- would control the The hope Is that such International ef- fort might ultimately lead to con- trol ot atomic weapons also, Dulles tta: said he planned .to discuss the Idea with Soviet For- eign Minister Molotov at the Ber- lin conference, originally proposed for Jan. 4. Biit when Jhe meeting was postponed to Jan. 2S, he In- structed Charles E. Bohlcn, U.S. AnitMiMdor at'Moscow, to Ukt it up with Molotov. Last night's Soviet communique, reporting talks yesterday and last Thursday between Bohlcn and Mol- otov, said Bohlen sought prelimi- nary atom conversations in Wash- ington before Jan. 25 or at Berlin during the foreign ministers' get- together. At yesterday's meeting, the com- munique said. Molotov told Bohlcn Russia "considers it desirable" to Set going and agreed to start in Washington. There was no mention In the communique of the Soviet objec- tion that Eisenhower's plan does not go far enough. The objection. Dec. 21 when Russia first agreed to negotiate the plan, was that it provided for peacetime atomic development but offered no restraints against atom bombs. Russia said the bomb should be outlawed, much poison gas was, under International pledges not to ers. On the outside printed the words "Abilene Civil Defense and Disaster Emergency Rdief Pro- gram." "We want to emphasize the importance of all the people hav- ing these scrapbooks and pasting in the series of Sunday articles." Dobbyn said, "not only so they will know how the city will operate in case of a disaster but also for their own protection." Information in the series of newspaper articles will include: (1) What to do and what not to do when disaster strikes. (2) How to protect the food in the home. (3) How to purify the water. (4) Control of sanitation within the home when there is no water. (5) Emergency provisions for caring for.the-saniiation problem of babies in the home. (6) Best places to go in sase of a tornado. (7) How to protect one's self in his own home in a tornado. (8) Many ideas on building storm shelters and protecting one's self and one's family. WHAT'S NEWS ON INSIDE PAGES VIOLENCE GONE U. S. and Korean rift has, tcmnororily of least, been set- tled on the disposing of pris- oners of war. Pocie 3-A. McMURRY CAGERS HOME McMurry College's basketball team will ploy host to South- west Texas State tonight. Page 6-A. TAKE GOVERNMENT SERI- OUSLY Sen. Lyndon 8. Johnson tells of his experiences as he tours Texas. A SURE WAY.. To act your soles message before the buying power of this West Texos trade area is to use> the Sunday Wont Ad section of The Sunday deadlines: Word Ads: Saturday Noon. Spoct Ads: Friday Noon. You con call 2-7841 gnd your ad over Jeltphone. BUSS FOR THE GOVERNOR Ann Bryant, Dallas polio victim, kisses Gov. Allen Shivers after gov- ernor signed a proclamation declaring January as March of Dimes Month. At right is state March ot Dimes chairman R J: Smith. NO OPINION GIVEN Court Denies Plea To Oust Laughlin AUSTIN Supreme Court of: Texas today refused 'to order immediate suspension of 79th Dis- trict Judge C. Woodrow Laughlin of Alice prior to a'decision on re- moving him from office. Suspension "without further mo- tion" had been sought in the high court yesterday by the. same 11 attorneys who had brought earlier court action to remove Laughlin I from T office.. i The .Supreme Court's overruling I of .the-motion was withojit written opinion. It followed a brief-, early-! morning -conference of the appel- j ate judges. The petitioning attorneys had i contended suspension pending the court's final decision on whether to remove Laugnlin is authorized by the state constitution. Such action, they added, would protect the peaple of the 79th Judi- aal District against possible con- tinued practice of the acts for which the attorneys think Laaghlin should be ousted from'office. Justified by Findings Counties.in the district are'Jini Wells, Duval, Brooks, and Starr. The 11 attorneys said suspension of Laughlin. is. justified by four indings of .District Judge D. B. Yood, who was appointed by .the Supreme Court as master to hear testimony during the month-long removal hearing last summer. Those findings, they the following: 1. That Laughlir. showed partial- ly toward certain individuals or groups on' several'occasions.' 2. Laughlin's acts constituted of- 'icial misconduct; on his: part' as district judge. 3. Laughlin's acts constituted! a portrayal of such habits and con- duct on his: part as to rentier him unBt to hold the judgeship. 4. Lsughlin's acts constituted op- iression on the people of Duval 'Favored Parr Party' Specifically. Wood had reported o the Supreme Court last month n his 65 pages of findings that Laughlin obstructed investigation of the Alice slaying of Jacob S. Jr.. improperly released )uval County ballots, and was un- ustified in naming a judge to hear cases in which Laughhn himself was charged: Wood also found that Laughlin by releasing the Duval County bal- lots, "showed partiality toward, and was motivated solely, by a de- sire to favor, George and his political party." Parr long has been identified as the political boss of Duval County. THE WEATHER C.S. DXrAKTSETr OF COMMERCE WEATHER IHIRK.UI ABILENE ASD VJCIXITV FurUy loudy tonlrtt, bccomlns nosBs cloudy 'Tiaay. Rigti Thursday 0. low nboK !5. XOSTH CEXTRAI, TEXAS: nidlntsi ailM Tharsdty. -TrUly mostly etoudj- mIM. WEST TEXAC; Incrtislap elaadlaess mud Thursday. Frldny mostly cloudy. JO Pwe EAST AND SOUTH CENTRAL TEXAS: mild -Thursday. Friday mostly and mild. TKMPEKATVKCS TVfd. P.M. Ttiurs. A.M. 
                            

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