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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: January 4, 1954 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - January 4, 1954, Abilene, Texas                                 WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES  PRICE DAILY 5c, SUNDAY 10c  ABILENE, TEXAS, MONDAY EVENING, JANUARY 4, 1954—SIXTEEN PAGES IN TWO SECTIONS  Associated  VOL. LXXIII, No. 202  Abilene Bank Deposits Hit New Record High  Total Rises $2.6  SEAS DIE DOWN  Europe Dikes, Sea Walls Stand Firm Against Tides  the seas die down today.  In England, police and Coast Guards kept an all-night vigil in low coastal areas, then left their watch as weathermen reported soon after 10 a.m. that the crisis hour of high tide had passed safely.  In the Netherlands, where overnight water levelr were the highest since last i er's floods in which 1,795 \ "ons died, the situation was i rt-ed nearly back to norm.  LONDON <VP> — Western Europe’s dikes and sea walls, age-old bastions against the raging oceans, stood strong and firm today after 24 hours of battering by gale-churned seas.  Anxious watchers, remembering when flood waters burst through the dikes and wrecked vast areas of the Low Countries and Eastern England last February, sighed with relief as they watched  Half of Air Force Bombers Now Jets  NEXT GOAL: TEXAS  Batchelor, bride Set 2nd Honeymoon  An Abilene man and Hamlin man ran for safety from a pick-up truck stalled on the T&P railroad tracks here Monday morning and escaped injury as a freight train smashed the truck broad-side, knocking it 50 feet from the crossing.  James Blanton. 53, Hamlin dirt contractor who was driver of the truck, and passenger Charles A. Ellison, 53, employe at the wrecking yard of Texas Auto Parts, 3635 South First St., said they did not see the approaching west-bound freight until the engine was almost upon them.  The accident occured about 11 15 a. m. at the wrecking yard In the 4000 block of South First St. The men were entering the wrecking yard drive that crossed the tracks from the street.  Blanton said the truck motor died as the truck straddled the railroad tracks. He and Ellison had been busy attempting to start the motor for a short time before the train approached.  Blanton said the train engineer told him the train was not seriously damaged, with the possible exception of a step leading to the engine cab, and the train continued on its way after about a half-hour delay.  The truck was knocked 50 feet without turning over, and a par-Itally-filled butane cylinder in the rear of the truck rolled approximately 53 yards farther, coming to rest in a fence row.  be persuaded to return home.  **I answered no, that 1 stayed awake last night thinking about what to write them,” Kvoko said. “He said 'Okay, there is no big hurry.’ Bui I think I will write tonight.”  Batchelor asked his wife not to tell the names of the three Americans.  “One has a wife in the United States, one has a mother there and one is a lone pet son w ith no family,” she said. ,  TOKYO T—Cpl. Claude Batchelor and his Japanese wife Kyoko happily planned a second honeymoon and an evening of dancing at a Japanese night club when they had a two-hour reunion at Tokyo Army Hospital today.  Kyoko’s love letters played an important part in Batchelor’s decision to ask repatriation fron^ a pro-Red prison compound in Korea. She said she planned to write tonight, at her husband s request, to three other Americans who stayed with the Communists.  Batchelor arrived here yesterday after renouncing his decision to stay with the Reds. He and his wife were together for four hours soon after his arrival at the hospital and she returned for a two-hour reunion today.  Kvoko said her husband will be given a pass Wednesday and plans to have a dark blue suit made to take her dancing.  Then, she said, they plan to visit a resort for a second honeymoon  She said they discussed plans and decided to visit Batchelor s parents in Texas, then decide where to live.  “Personally. 1 think he will want to come back to Japan.” she said.  Batchelor asked his wife whether she had written letters to three American prisoners he said might  Rites Set at Trent For Crash Victims  NOT THE DROUGHT  Here's What Caused Rain Average Drop  TRENT, Jan. 4 RNS>- Graveside rites were to be held at 4 p.m. Monday in Trent Cemetery for a Trent father and son who burned to death in an automobile crash near Brownwood Sunday evening,  George L. Price. 77, and his son, Cullen H. Price, 34. died in a flaming two-car collision in which four Bangs High School students were injured.  Tl>> Rev. Dwayne Welch. Baptist pastor at Trent, was to officiate at the services. Burial was to be under the direction of Star-buck Funeral Home of Merkel.  Father and son were en route to Galveston at the time of the accident. A daughter of the elder Price. Mrs. Jim Smith of Merkel, was scheduled to undergo surge»> at John Sea ley Hospital there.  They died in the flaming wtvek-age of their 1951 Chevrolet after it collided with another car on U. S. Highway 64 about midway between Brownwood and Bangs.  Four high school boys in the other car were injured, none seriously, and were admitted to Medical Arts Hospital at Brownwood,  Tliev were James Segrist. 17. Ronnie Bauer. 15, Bobby Sikes. 16, and Marion Alexander. 16. Segrist, Bauer and Sikes are all prominent in athletics at Bangs High School, where ill but Segrist. a junior, are sophomoivs,  Alexander was treated for a broken finger and possible concussion of the brain, the others for  What has happened to Abilene’s . rainfall?  Residents of thi* area of West Texas are aware that there hasn’t ; been an over-abundance of rain \ the last three to five years, but some have been startled by the sharp drop in official figures recently released representing Abi- j lene s and Taylor County’s aver- j age annual rainfall.  And they’re doing their best to give the lie to Mark Twain’s charge that nobody does anything about the weather.  Rainfall figures listed in The Texas Almanac, accepted in Texas as being authoritative, dropped from an annual average of 25.17 inches for Abilene in the 1952-53 edition to 22.55 in the edition released within the last two months.  The controversy started when statistically minded Abilenians figured that even the extended drought of recent years wouldn’t have that much effect on the city’s average rainfall over a period of 68 years, the length of time official weather records have been kept here, and they started sharpening their pencils to prove it.  Almost every mathematician w ho tried his hand came up with a different answer. Throughout the clamor one man who should know most about Abilene’s weather, C. E. Sitchler, meteorologist in charge of the U. S. Weather Bureau here, kept his silence.  Now, in a letter directed to Editor Frank Grimes of The Reporter-New s, he has come forth with an official answer, as follows  "A year or so ago my Powers That Be instructed me to compute new normals for temperature and rainfall based on a more recent period of time and to use the records for the period 1921-1950.  “I had records for the downtown office for the years 1921-1943, and records for the airport station for the years 1939 to 1950. »Since the normals were to be tor the airport location, 1 used the period 1939 to 1943 during which time records vvere available for both locations to determine as closely as possible what temperatures and rainfall were at the airport for the ' years 1921 to 1938. Having determined the mean yearly rainfall and temperature tor that period, I j merely got tin* total for the entire 30 years and divided by 30 ( "To forestall wear and tear on adding machines over the city, 1 i would like to point out that if one | adds the rainfall for 1921-1950 using the amounts given In your pa*  ! per a while back, he still won’t get : 22,55 inches for a mean. The ta-j hie of rainfall is the record for the city office from 1885 to 1943 and for the airport from 1944,  “1 might add also that the practice of using the mean for a number of .v ears for a "normal” cau-  THE WEATHER  OLD ORCHARD BEACH. Maine UP —Eight voung children perished today in two separate fires, five in their dwelling at this ocean resort and three in a flame-swept cottage at North Sebago, 20 miles to the northwest. The two mothers were burned in futile rescue efforts.  Four brothers and a sister, children of Mr. and Mrs. Norman Whitcomb, were trapped in upstairs bedrooms of their two story home at Atlantic Avenue here.  \t North Sebago, three preschool age children of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Metzger, died in their winterized cottage near the shore o! Sebago Lake,  5,1      10    30       .    58  54    11    30    6.’  54    12    10    S3  M&ximutn    temperature    for    34    hours  ending »'• S.30 a m 67  Minimum    tomperature    for    34    hours  ondina at 6 SS a.m. 50  UN Vows to Free All PWs by Jan. 22  ers who refuse to return to their Red-ruled homelands.  U. N. officers said rail ear and truck convoys will be waiting south of the demilitarized zone for freed ai ti-Comnnmist prisoners and that ships at ln ’hon will be readied to carry any of the 14,000 Chinese who may wish to go to Formosa.  Other officers have said the I NC is prepared to move all 20.000 prisoners -if necessary out of the Munsan area in two to three days.  Neither the Indian command nor the NNRC apparently has made a firm decision regarding the Jan. 22 release date.  Thimayya, alter reading Hull’s statement, commented to newsmen:  “it has always been the Indian position that the two sides must agree to any detention of prisoners after Jan. 22. If the two sides do not agree, we will, of course, have to devise some means of releasing them,"  sion that accused the I'NC of maintaining control over the anti* Red prisoners.  “The U. N. Command.” Hull declared, "categorically denies any implication that we have attempted, in an> way, to exercise control to the slightest degree over" the prisoners.  He said the Communist high command caused the collapse of the explanation program by:  1. Unreasonable and changing demands for explanation facilities.  2. Refusal to accept reasonable numbers of willing prisoners for explanations each day.  3. The Reds’ rejection of available explanation time unless the NNRC ami Indian custodial troops approved all their demands-including the use of force to make POVVs listen to explanations,  Hull told Thimayya the I NC is fully prepared to handle the 20,000 North Korean and Çbinese prison-  Ml NSAN, Korea (.ft The U. N. Commander, Gen. John E Hull, today blamed the Communists for the breakdown of prisoner explanations and said without qualification that all anti-Red prisoners will bo freed at midnight Jan, 22.  To drive home the I NC demand that the captives be released “as of 12:01 a.m. Jan. 23.” U. S. Marines and engineers began stringing miles of barbed wire fences to channel the prisoners from neutral zone compounds to rail heads.  South Korea’s Foreign Minister r.vun Yung Tal hailed Hull’s stand as “just right.”  Hull reiterated the U. N. Command’s position in a strongly worded letter to Lt. Gen. K S. Thimayya, Indian chairman of the Neutral Nations Repatriation Commission,  The U. N. commander blasted as one-sided and slanted a report by Indian. Polish and Czech member» of the repatriation commit*  PLANE PATTERN - This unusual view of Pam her jets and Skvraiders on the flight deck of the aircraft earner I'SS Kersage was taken from the top of a cargo crane by an ambitious navy photographer at Kokesmka, Japan, iiaval station.  TROOP WITHDRAWAL  ocroH to quu Le erv ciiion to withdraw two c from Korea. Page 5 A,   

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