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   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - December 26, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                 'msm    Abilene 3l^»cirter~S^vn¿ MDRNIIVB  "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS /T GOES."-Byron  vor.. LXIV, NO. 187  A TEXAS NZWSPAFSK  ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY MORNING, DECEMBER 26, 1944.—TEN PAGES  Associated Press ÍAP)  United Press (DJ'.t  PRICE FIVE CENTS  'Churchill, Eden •Arrive in Greece  By STEPHEN BARBER ATHENS, Dec. 25—(AP)—Prime Minister Churchill and •foreign Secretary Eden arrived dramatically in embattled Aithens today and immediately began conferences seeking to settle the 23-day-old Greek conflict.  Even as the British Prime Minister and his Foreign Secretary were arranging for a general meeting of all factions for 4 p. m. Tuesday, the ^left-wing ELAS group continued furious fighting with British and Greek H government forces throughout this Christmas Day. Cannon fire and rocket blasts reverberated in the city.  The ELAS was Invited to send three or four representatives to the conference, with promises of safe ^onduct.  Aichbishop Eiamaskinos of Athens, mentioned as a possible regent for Greece in previous attempts to settle the conflict, will preside, at the Tuesday meeting.  The seriousness with which the Greek situation is regarded was indicated by the announcement to-  night that Churchill and Eden had arrived and disclosure that Field (^Marshal Sir Harold Alexander, Allied commander-in-chief in the Mediterranean; and Harold McMillan, British Resident Minister in the Mediterranean, both were in Athens also.  A Churchill, who has vigorously defended against numerous critics his action in using British troops against the Greek Leftists, Immediately held conferences with these British offl-^ clals, the Greek Royan Govern-” nxent premier and others.  News of the arrival of Britain’s top leaders in Athens was the first intimation to the world of their personal intervention in the Greek internal crisis, which has involved ^ three weeks of civil war.  Heretofore they had dealt through MacMillan, and Lieutenant General Ronald M. Scobie, British command-er-in-chief An Greece.  Armistice iealings with the Leftist ELAS have thus far been fruit-O less and figh:ing has continued.  This was Eden's second visit to Greece within a few months. He went to Athens with the late Lord Moyne. British Minister Resident in the Middle East, October 26 a ,% few days befCre the latter’s assass-' Inatlon in    Churchill-  and Eden had seen Marshal Stalin in Moscow.  The following communique was Issued in Athens tonight and a copy forwarded the Headquarters of the ÍÍ ELAS central committee:  ‘TVIr. Churchill and Mr. Eden arrived in Athens today.  “After coijimunication with Field Marshal Sir Harold Alexander. commander-in-chief of the Allied forces In the Mediter-ranean (Mr. Harold MacMillan) and the British Ambassador. (Mr. Reginald Lceper). they In-tcrvirwed the. Greek Prime Minister (M. Papandreou) and informed him that they propos-» ed to convene a conference, rep-^ rcsentatlvc so far as possible, of Greek political opinion.”  “Tfie conferepce is to enable her to resume her place among the United Nations. The Central ELAS Committee is being invit-ed to send delegates to take their part in this conference. The necessary safe conduct will be given to these delegates. The Archbishop of Athens has con-Vijnted to preside at this conference as chairman.”  ^ At the snme time as the communique was Issued, a me.ssage to the ELAS Central Committee In which General Scobie invited the ELAS to send three or four delegates to tomorrow’s conference also was re-leased. It stated:  ^ “General Scobie received at 8 a. m. on the evening of December 22 a reply from the ELAS Central Committee to his statement of December 16. he is forwarding for the Information of the corrunittee a copy ^ of a communique issued in Athens  *    this evening,  ■‘The Central Committee are accordingly invited to send delegates to take their part in the proposed c ference.  “All necessary arrangements will be made for their safe conduct.  “It is suggested that they should send three or four delegates as they may prefer. The meetings will be at 4 p. m. on December 26.”  British beaufighters blasted the ELAS concentrations with rockets  •    and cannon in the northern suburbs of the Greek capital.  The Weather  DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE  partly cloudy  colder Tuesday. ^Vednesda  EAST TEXAS— Partly cloudy and older In north portion', mostly cloudy nd considerably colder In south Tues-ay: showers In extreme south portion. Wednesday partly cloudy and not aulte  colder except In  partly cloudy  n<ile. H’ednesda  TEMPERATURES  ...... 8« -    47  ...... -    47  ...... 34 .    47  .    4R  Ulfth  iiicrh 43 and Suns*  Sunrise this mornluc: 8:38.  low tempercturen to 0 p. i low for '.nw' date )axl ye last  ________ this  Sun«e« tonlffht: 6:43.  Army Plane Crash Toll 10' 17 Are Hurt  HARRISBURG, Dec« 25—(;P>—An Army transport plane crashed into fog-ringed Roundup Mountain early today, killing ten soldiers and injuring 17 others.  Officials at the Middletown Air Technical Service Command said that the plane was on a special mis-' sion from Jacksonville, Fla., Minneapolis, Minn., but withheld the names of the dead and injured until the nearest of kin had been notified.  “It was the worst sisht I t saw,” said fire chief William Vo-gelsong of nearby New Cumberland B of the first to reach the scene a heavily wooded section known Reeser’s Summit, five miles from Harrisburg.  Vogelsong said the plane hit tree and a wing and the engines were on fire when he arrived with the New Cumberland fire company in response to a telephone call from a resident.  “The men were in the plane crying for help and we had to oat our way to them with an ax. Part of one wing was bn a tree.;200 feet from the plane.’*  MarkKuehi>,77, Succumbs Here  Mark Kuehn, 77, died at Hendrick Memorial hospital Sunday following an illness of several months.  He had moved to Abilene a year ago to be with his only son, L. S. Kuehn, 1233 Vine.  Funeral rites were held yesterday morning at Kiker-Warren chapel with Mr. Badgitt, Christian Science church reader, officiating.  The body was taken to Dallas for cremation and will be buried in Cedar Hill cemetery here Thursday.  Mr. Kuehn came here from Cleveland. Ohio, where he had been connected with the National Steel Casing Co. for 50 years.  Survivors include his son and brother. Paul Kuehn of Denver, Co^o.  War Prisoners Stage 'Silenf Night'' Opus  DUNKIRK. N. Y. Dec. 25—(;P>— German war prisoners, interned In the branch prisoner of war camp here, observed their first Christmas in captivity by staging a play, “The Origin of Silent Night.”  Eight prisoners, speaking in German, took part In the play, presented in a barracks before other prisoners and their guards.  At the conclusion of the play, a chorus of 18 prisoners sang “Silent Night.” The internees constructed the scenery and a stage. Costiunes were provided by the chaplain.  Nazis Drive For Meuse  By JAMES. M. LONG PARIS, Dec. 25—(AP)—The Germans %vere bursting toward the Meuse in a fierce new show of armored power on this bitter cold Christmas Da^- in which Allied air armadas for the third straight day darkened the skies with one of the mightiest attacks since D-Day  ' and wrought terrific ruin.  NAZI t,EADERS CONFER ON “BIG DRIVE —Field Marshal Walter Model, left, and Marshal Karl von Rundstedt (extreme right) study a map of their counter-offensive against the Allies. With them are staff officers. Photo made in Western Front headquarters according to German accompanying this radiophoto from neutral sources. (NEA radiotelephoto).  OPA Lists New Point Schedules  WASHINGTON, Dcc. 25 —{fl»)  _Housewives will find more ration points are required and their supply of valid points diminished when they shop for food tomorrow.  Ration points will be required for six canned vegetables — peas, corn, green and wax beans, asparagus and spinach — In addition to tomatoes, under new Ofllce of Price Administration regulations effective at 12:01 a. m., eastern ^ar time, Tuesday. A potihd of butter will Increase Irom' 20 to 24 r«d polrits 'fii valué at the same time.  , And beginning December 31, about 85 per cent of ail meats will be back on the ration list.  Not all ration stamps the housewife may have on hand wlU be valid either. All red and blue stamps which becamo good before December 1 and all sugar stamps and home canning certificates except No. 34 are cancelled. That leave-s Book Four red stamps Q5. HS and S5 and Book Four blue stamps X5, Y5. 25, A2 and B2 valid tomorrow.  Five new red stamps — T5 through X5 — and five blue stamps — C2 througii GZ — will become valid December 31. Each will be worth 10 points.  In announcing the changes, OPA emphasized that "there is ample food for all.” but said the action was taken to insure everyone a fair share of scarce item^. Price Amln-istrator Chester Bowles said civilian supplies of sugar, butter and commercially canncd fruits and vegetables are at the lowest point since the war began and meat supplies are declining.  Both meat and sugar allowances will be reduced under the new regulations. The four-week point allowance for meat per person will be 50 point-s while five pound.s of sugar will be tlie quota per person for a three-months period instead of 10 weeks.  B-29 Lost Over Tokyo  21ST U. S. BOMBER COMMAND, SAIPAN. Dec. 3—‘ Delayed)—  A Superfortre^^s wa.s lost over Tokyo today, carrying two colonels, a major and nine others to almost certain death. It was the second B-29 downed in combat there.  NAZI U-BOAT HERO IS PRISONER IN U.S.  iTwenty-flve German war prisoners v^Jay escaped (rom an Arizona prison camp. The story will be found on Page  2. column 7. Editor.)  By The Associated Press Disclosure that Guenther Prien is a prisoner of war In Arizona lifts partly for the first time in three and one>half years the total/mystery covering the fate of this most famous of Germany’s U-boat command-  It was cn October 14. 1939. when the war was less than six weeks old, that Prien, then a lieutenant commander, startled the world by slip« ping into the closely-guarded British naval base at Scapa Plow and sinking the 29.000-ton British battleship “Royal Oak” with a torpedo. Eight hundred and ten of the "Roj’al Oak’s" officers and men were killed.  Prien then managed to get his submarine safely out of the British stronghold and returned to Germany where Adolf Hitler personally decorated him with the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross and promoted him to the rank of commander. Prien then was 32 years old.  Prien claimed to have torpedoed and damaged the Brit>  ish battle cruiscr “Repulse“ at the same time he sank the “Royal Oak”, but this the British denied.  How he got in and out of Scapa Plow has never been satisfactorily explained, although many legends quickly grew up about the exploit.  Subsequently, during several cruises In 1940. Prien was credited by the Germans with sinking more than 50,000 tons of British shipping. He was the German underseas service's hero of heroes.  Then came a curiously antl-climactlc dcnouncment. On May 2, 1941. the British radio reported that he had been missing since April 13, 1941. How the British knew this never was disclosed.  Reluctantly the German hieh command on May 23. 1941. acknowledged that Prien and his submarine had failed to return from a cruise Presumably he was dead. His name never was mentioned publicly again.  Now it is disclosed that Prien. the toaat of the German navy, suffered a fate that mnny submariners consider worse than death—he was captured. How and when remain secret.  Auto Fall Kills Tot, Another Hurt  Unusual Christmas eve accidents In which two children fell from automobiles on highways near Abilene cost the life of two-ycar-old Douglas Schmitt and left Sandra Sheets of Sweetwater In Hendrick .'\Xemorial hospital in a critical condition from injuries.  The Schmitt child was riding in a---  Strasbourg Shines With Loaned Light  STRASBOURG. Dec. 23—(Delayed)—(i^P)— This has become a city of borrowed light in the shadow of frontline war.  American troops patrol its streets. French flags float serenely over its rooftops. But no part of this Alsa-ilan capital is more than five miles away from German guns. Most of it is closer, and its waterfront on the Rhine Is under machine gun and morUr fire from the oppos5ite bank.  So it was a simple matter for German artillery to knock out a municipal power plant. Tlie only surprise was that they waited three riav.': br-fore doing it after the Seventh Army drove them out of town. Since then nearly a month has passed nnd Army civil affairs delachment.s collaborating with Frendi authorities have managed to borrow moueh electricity from town.s well bovcmd the artillery range to lllumhiato all Strasbourg.  There also was enouf?h for pumping the city’s wninr >upply nnd operating refrigeration plnnt.s and lios-pital electrical equipment. Only street? cars still are idJp.  Strasbourg’s food .situation presently is satisfactory, too. larKcly due to the fact that retreat int? Germans left so much behind.  Major Robert A. Gish, former Cheyenne, Wyo.. engineer :.nd now commanding officer of civil affairs detachments, estimated tljp .stork was sufficient for eight weck.s with the city’s present population of 120.-000. Under Oennan occupofio'n Strasbourg was the dlstrlbuthiR renter for Alsace, hence the size of the reserves. Additional suppljo« f)f various kinds will be avnllahlc wlicn-ever the Germans fall back and the waterfront and its warehoases are freed from close ran?e firr, Meanwhile. Strasbourc rifizcn.s are getting the highest broad ration tn ^ance — 300 grams dailv. Properiv damage was relatively    m.-j/iy  shops and a number of re.stanrantf: have opened, and retail trade has been resumed with Germi.n marks and French francs both rirrulrithie on the basts of 15 franr.v to one mark. The movement of civilir.n.«^ .still is sharply re.strictrd, howrvrr, and passes are required to go fr<im one part of the city to the other  There is no refugee problf-rr. here — in fact it is jast the revc7>r- sinro many thoiisand.s of Gern\aii nution-als fled acrass the Rhitu- \\hi!e bridge still were available, ienvinc the city's population below nf>riniil. There still are 5.000 dispUued persons here, however — D\itrh. Pn)i.<;h. Czech and Russian workrr.v — whf gradually are being moved rearwnrd for eventual repatriation.  On the other hand it i.s e.stimotfd that 30.000 German natJonaLs .<^11]) are living in Strasbourg. What to do with all of them Is a politiral problem complicated by the emofion/i] reaction of the French who live under German occupation. For the time being the Germans are beinti closely watched.  MacArthur Complete  Victory n Leyte  car with his parents, Lt. and Mrs. Clarence P. Schmitt, and another couple.  He apparently rolled down a window in the back seat of the automobile, lost his balance and fell from the vehicle. His head struck the pavement and the child was dead upon arrival at the regional hospital at Camp Barkeley.  M. E. Crawford, driver of an Abi-lene-View bus, was driving toward camp Barkeley on highway 158 and saw the child fall from the car which was enroute to Abilene about foiur xnBes froni thq city Umlts. CjwiiQrd tqJ4^iiiYe5tigg.tliift highway patrolmen E.-E. Powell and Pat Ross that he swerved the bus and missed the child.  Patrolman Ross said medical officers at the hospital told him the child died Instantly as a result of the fall. The accident occured about 8:30 p. m.  The body is at Eaiiotfs funeral home. Burial will be made in Canton. Ohio.  The child's father Is stationed at Camp Barkeley.  The Sheets child, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Phil K. Sheets of Sweetwater, fell from an automobile in which she was riding with her parents and grandparents three miles west of the city on highway 1.  The little girl pushed the door handle, the door flew open and she fell from the car onto the shoulder of the road.  Slie was rushed to the Abilene hospital for treatment and last night late her condition w’as unchanged—critical.  Her father is manager of the Bluebonnct hotel in Sweetwater.  Isolated Isles Get Yule Gifts  HEADQUARTERS. ALASKA DEPARTMENT, Dec. 25—~ Four dots In the Bering Sea—St. ^aul. St. George. St. Matthew and Nini-vak Islands—had their Christmas todi*»/ because of a special flight made through bitter weather by Lieutenant J. J. Treviiani of San Francisco. The crew with pilot Tro visanl on the trip made to deliver 2.400 pounds of Christmas mall and packages included Lieutenant Joseph Smiddy of Sulphur Springs. Tex.  The training school boxed the cargo in 100-pound lots, strapping parachutes to the boxers.  The plane met temperatures averaging 13 degrees belcw zero and lower, battled powerful winds, worked 12 hours against the elements without food or drink. Water taken along froze solid.  FBI Probes Wreck Of Train in Illinois  BELVIDERE. 111.. Dec. 25— While FBI agents pres.sed an investigation into the derailment of a Chicago and Northwestern passenger train near Poplar Grove. 111., yesterday. the coroner’s office in Boone county announced tonight an inquest would be held Into the death of Mrs. Anna Quirk. 68. Beloit. Wls.. only fatality of the accident.  Five other victims of the wreck were in critical condition and the coroners office said date of the inquest would awaiV physicians reports on their chances of .survival.  m addition to Mrs. Quirk, who was pinned beneath one of the overturned coaches, 22 persons were injiu-ed.  By CLYDE BARTEL Associated Press War Editor General Douglas MacArthur today said the campaign for Leyte island In the Philippines was ctosod, giving the Japanese commander General Tomoyuki Yamashlta “The Tiger” “perhaps the greatest defeat In the military annals of the Japanese army.”  The fight for Leyte, invaded by the Americans October 20 In the initial liberation thrust into the Philippines, has cost the Nipponese estimated 113.331 casualties compared with 11,217 for the Yanks, headquarters said. The Japanese have lost 2.748 planes in the Philippines since the invasion.  Tokyo government officials had said that Japan's fate in the war depended upon the outcome of the jj »yte campaign, and had boa.sted ihat Its soldiers would hold thi Lsiand.  Tokyo meanwhile broadcast a wholly unconfirmed claim that Japanese submarines are “again operating nlong the United States Pacific coast.” The Domel News Agency radio report was heard In London yesterday by the BBC.  Domel said Nipponese submarines ^.’tre striking In force fttter a two-  ^car period, and that four of the ...... .............  undersea raiders alone had sunk, ^ foiir aircraft carriers, two destroy-ers and four transports.  The enemy radio also said three  Budapest Is Nearly Encircled  LONDON. Tuesday. Dec.  —The Red Army drove to the wrstem city limits of Budapest yesterday ond. In a 15-mlle advance, cut the last railway escape route westward from the Hungarian capital and came within 10 miles of completely surrounding it.  The Russians also surged westward through southern Czfchoslo-Garam)  river north and .south of Leva 'Le-, vlre> In a drive within les.s than 65 American Super^tonress^s dropped,    .    gg  incendiary bombs on Tokyo and  rby  In  ureas  visits. This also was unconfirmed.  Mar Arf hur'.s »nnoijiicement oi the end of the Leyte ranipuign .said that unit.*^ of the 77lh V. S. Division, .supported tjy Seventh V- S. Fleet PT boat5, ,storme<l ashort- at the west coa.st town of Palomiion Christma.s morninu and raptund thus Inst port throuyli whli-h renUKUii.s of Japanese units initiJu have r aped. Yank land artillery also pounded the town.'^ from the hill''  YiimnshUii. ron«jtirror of Malay rmnisuliv and SinKUpore In 1912. was made commander of the enemy’s PhiHiipine defense in October. He announced his Intention to take the quick unconditional surrentler of MacArthur.  The Japane.se talhn« 27 war.ships port.s and 30.000 li' ran lieadquarter.s e.^  !ittenii)i.‘^ to reinfor« ’ I.f'vt,e.  Mar.^rthur .said Aiiieru an ca.siuil-tle.s on I.evte, covoiuit’ '"¡ly «round forcf.'-. w«-re 2.02:? kiH<d. B 422 wounded and 172 nii.s.sinu  convoys to-irl 41 tran.«^-<. by Ameri-i.ir. In futile  said  .'Kme  [Jlar  I hit Clark Field n^-ai : I'-land. .Sunday <M:i : about 40 tori.s of b I down 18 of upward.^;  I trrrf))tor aircraft ' I ed tr> defend  ponf'.^^e airdrome  ; if. w.^.s fh^ f)nrd I Luzon raid.s by Y;u ; from Lfyte and al.^ Mmfioro i.siand. wti , cans invaded De< f in' f-r drfinnce of J:ip:in 'the United Statf.»- J ■paii;?.    and w«.'  Miinlla. Lu  tly  of j  ;iblv Ir  nouneing these sticcesses Inst Jiiiiht. crild ihnv u'er»» nrr<->rnníl.c>ied with severe eost to the Nazi'î in both men and material. Inflicted bv Rns>vtnn bombers as wr-H r.«; ^roiuid troops.  The toll nf Oerman and Hmi-cnrian df^ad In the five davs of fl7hiinc southwest of Rudanesr has risen, bv Pu'^slan nernunt. tn more than 14.000 aiîd h?uid’-erls of Nn?! dend were Inft on tlie b:t11leflold.s of southern C7.erhnslo\ akla  The enrnrnantqiie «Iresv^r! flje elamjiinç of the vire on Budapest. Iiowever. and annoiineed (baf i"    «est arwl  west of that eltv Deremh-r 21-21 thr Russians had slain !’,000 Germán and llunetirian soldiers, ranliiretl .^.4HR. nnd destrnvptl or selred vast nuanflties of war material. This Inrhidrd ?ni tanks, liifi planes and 117 cannon destroyed, plus eaottire of 154 clanes, many in first-eliss condition. 21 tanks and 101 cannon.  On Deeembnr ak'tir* R1 Ofrman tnrikv worn knocked "Ut sonMi'-v.-st of nufiapest. thp Russian' announced  The Soviet drive broi of Piliscsaba, 13 inil^ rtf Budanest. throuj-'h the elrrtrle raih'oad This was the In-t mil rfnnaiiîlni! to thr- Orrn T)ir> enernv has r^m; of f>n miles bet  icht  tlu- Ha  ube 1  Pili‘  - Uii« Is  saba  Memphis Says:  (Hie!) 'Merry Xmas'  •MK.MPHI.S, Dfr J'. of Menipins .said ' ; ma.s" to 30 persons t-inc fhem from Jail v been lodged on dr\ui  e Anierj- ' if»As frRct of wooded    anr} the  In anotli- Ru.<<,sians north of M,.. n;mub<- al-rtii>n that ready are drivin«    u arri uiih a  me t ain- j view of cuttlnc »-vf-n *ha' cioubt-  !    I fui nathwnv  .M.so caplureri wa.s    v n r. 18  miles northwest of Burlapesr  AlthouRh their rail rou»'’^ nf e.s-eape were lost, the Cl.-rinans In Budapest, still controllori at least otie or two airfields  Northwest of Budapev, M;irshal Rodion Y. Malinovsky s    Uk  raine Army was .spreadin« ou' along the Hron on both side.«; of I^eva. np-  '—T1  bv releas-they ))Hd less charg-  parently preparing last Important river Austria Seven pia  bar  'he Hu.ssmns  Freezing Weather Due in City Today  Freezing weather is In store for Abllenlans today with the foreea.st of partly cloudy and coldei for the day.  The temperature tumbled from a high of 55 at noon Christma.s Day to 33 by 9 p. m.  GERMAN OFFENSIVE SEEN AS PEACE TERM FEELER  This Global War—  See DISPATCHES Pace 10  Bv U'KS GALI.AOHER  IN thf: stavelot sector. Beli:ium. Dec. 25 --ep - Pleld Marshal Karl von Rund.sfedf‘.s offensive pa.s.'^ed from the ‘ •ntlcar' Into new phHsc.s of impendintx a'tlon today, with most of the front .«-iiowing slgn.s of stabilization.  In thLs .sector GI rrjurage gave Hitler a grim ChrLstmas present by tearing the heart out of one of his panzer divLsions, destroying more than 178 armored vehicles, tanks and guns.  The Nazi armored .spearhead, driving toward Liege, was decimated in a mountain valley in eight days of  avage fighting during which veteran GI’s released 130 American soldiers taken prLsoner earlier and wiped out their captors almost to the last man.  The Crerman officers told their American prisoners that they were scheduled to arrive in Paris January 17. according to von Rundstedt’s plan, after which maybe ’’your Roosevelt will talk peace terms."  This was the first time that the German offensive had been described as a move to inflict such heavy casualties that the Allies would be willing to talk peace terms.  Texas Man Killed In Private Plane  CLEIVELAND. Dec. 25—(ff>—? body of Ottis L. Vaden, 45, insuran and reai estate man of Temple,}^ found today in the wreckage oU private plane 12 nUles west ofibe More than 100 men had'' ‘ searching for the plane in the; 1 iy timbered area for 48 ho'  A soldier hunting in the?-heard the plane crash Saturdasr<(^ notified Sheriff-elect- Clyde'Yo w'ho organized the searching^p  On the basis of latest positions disclosed at Supreme Headquarters tonight, as of mid-day Sunday, these advances were measured In perhaps one to three miles, but from field dispatches descrlbinb the force of the onslaught it seemed probable they had gone farther in terrific Christmas Day battles bloodily costly for both sides.  Against toughened doughboys resistance. the Germans this time were not reeling off bljf gains, bat they had definitely broken the 48-hour virtual stalemate.  One of the new surges was aimed il west of Laroche toward the Metxse, || probably no more than 15 miles ,| ahead of advanced enemy units farther south, reported operating near l_ Rochefort, 14 1-2' miles from toe I river.    ^1  A second was aimed northward ;| from Laroche In what appeared to be an atte.mpt to outflank the St. Vlth wedge which has split In two.^ the big German push In Belgltun.  One German force, pressing t southward within 16 miles of the French border, finally seized f Libramont. 23 miles northeast 1 of the French gateway city of I Sedan, and drove the Americans t from Rosieres, eight miles to the east.  An these forces traveled south, anfl American relief force some fourn mlle.’i farther east was fighting’ north in an attempt to relieve doughboy forces cut off In the Be>- I gian road center of Bastogne, s*jc | miles ahead of its advanced do^- I tlons.  Along the 25 miles of Field Mai^ L shal Karl von Rundstsdt’s southern! flank In the Ardennes hills, Oen-I eral Eisenhower's counter-attaclcl kept up its steady battering hhf.l there were no further gains re-1 ported since tUi& morning's .ran»I nounbehi6nt of the capture of three I  tOWTlJ.  (The Berlin radio said U- 8.1 force.s in great strength, paced bvl veteran divisions of the Third-andl Seventh Armies, went over to thel attack Sunday on a broad fronil against the southern flank and hadl forced some German withdrawals),! Striking In almost as great forr»» as ye«5terday’s 7.000-pIane t blow. Allied warplanes today wrecked at least 5tf tanks, de-'im siroyed or damaged 791 other4l armored vehicles and molor if transport in a renewed aerial'll onsLnutrht that lacked only ihejM full weight of the heavy bomb-t^ll er effdrt of the two preTlouS^fl days.    -i«*|  Vou iiundstedt still was thro^ hi:; ^;iia!fst wclKlit due west.  nir-toiine. In the center of souThenmiost w'odge. still was den hini tv.- an epic American defe: vliich .corned surrender and beitit; supplied by air.  Su[iri-ine Headquarters said a parJ ticnijiriv heavy battle develop .M;irvje. a mUc and ■ Soufheitst of the town, where r.MiJians fell upon the perimeter 'll fh'- (I'-'iitthhoy defenses w'lth tan I and infantr  On ihe north, the stron^^l German drive reached the vl-,;| clnity of Lierneiix and Grand« M inenll. II and nine miles south« : wr*it of Stavclot at the apex of'I the .American triangle splitting-*^ the German drives.    '  It wa.K not Immediately disci whnt had happened inside d"Ui.;h!;'v    but it wa5  p;tr»-nt thii’ the American forci , holduic; stron« ridge pasltlons th «rvf- in incr^'fislng danger of  cut off,  Alont: the north flank, the enen was diiven from the village of GU-izc. threo tniles wc.st of Stav lot, and L'iO prisoners were taken.  The line runninc west from Mali m»r)v *hro!u.'h ."^itavelot ond St01i| mont. .still was firmly held by I American.«,  i,,pside,s the terrific ruin by Th'- Allies (ynm fhe nir. the Gerf j mans were losing heavily in and armor and It seemed clear th ' American losses foo were ! Into costly figures, j One front dispatch reported I entire GermntT division had bee ;de.«;tioyed on an unnamed sector4| j A s(*cond dispatch, possibly n|  ' ferrini: 'o thf' snme action, said i armored dlvi.slon which speared th|  ) drive origljially aimed at tJtie fortr of Liege lost 178 tanks, armored Ve| hides and guns.    f  American pri-soners re]eascd|l by their comrade? said todayU their captor officers told them|| the offensive’s schcdulo called‘1 for arrival in Paris January  See MEVSE, Pg. 10, CoJ. 6  _'   

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Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

10 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 10 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 145+ million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 145 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 19 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication