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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: November 11, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - November 11, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                 m    ,    ' .-J  Abilene Í^eporter-i^tdfí MnilAI\0  WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES."-Bv:  TOn  •OL. LXIV NO. 145_A TEXAS NEWSPAPgB_ABILENE, TEXAS, SATURDAY MO]^ING, NOVEMBER 11. 1944—EIGHT PAGES    Associated Press (AP) Vnitea Pres, (VJ>.) PRICE FIVE CENTS  SUPERFORTS HAMMER~NANKING  Warehouses Docks Struck  WASHINGTON, Nov. 11.—(Saturday)—(AP)—A large JUisk forces of B-29 Superfortresses of the 20th Air Force attacked Japanese-occupied Nanking, China, today’s War de. partment announced.  In a daylight flight, the big planes attacked the dock and warehouse areas of the Yangtze river city, the announcement by Gen. H. H. Arnold, who commands the 20th Air Force, said. The announcement gave no details as to damage inflicted, but said further details would be released as soon' as they become available.  The raid was the first by SuEerfortresses reported by ^e War department since Nov. 5 when the B-29s bombed Singapore and an oil refinery in Sumatra. Nanking, chief city of Kiangsu province, is located 225 miles inland from Shanghai.  American aircraft and PT boats sank seven Japanese (jfcstroyers and three 5,000-ton transports in the Philippines, Gen. Douglas MacArthur said today, but the enemy succeeded in landing additional reinforcements on Leyte island last night before the convoy was blasted The Japanese, while mak-' ing a strong bid to break the “ar - - - -  rank hold on Leyte, reported over the Tokyo radio that Kweilin and Liuchow, vital defense centers in southeastern China, had fallen to Nip-^nese forces. Chungking, however, said that fightiijg .still was raging around these cities.  The Navy department announced  tat United States submarines have nk six more Japanese vessels, including a light cruiser, and Adm. Chester W. Nlmitz told of American air raids on enemy positions from the Kuriles to the Marianas.  ^'A MacArthur headquarters spokesman said the additional Nipponese with equipment put ashore at Ormoc, enemy base on Leyte’s wesfc coast, supplemented the 35,000 fresh froops which the American commander previously ^^estimated., had been landed In the pai&i.twojsvpeks.  Bombers and fighters pierced Intense anti-aircraft fire to sink the three transports and sisb of the destroyers. In the mass as-^ sault on the convoy which total-^ed four troop-marryin|r cargo ships and 15 destroyers. A FT boat got the other destroyer. Meanwhile, American groimd forces advanced against stiff opposition put up by the 35th imperial «pny, which is bitterly defending Ormoc, last of the enemys Leyte bases.  MacArthur said units of the 24th division are making progress on tlv road north of Ormoc. while the first cavalry division advanced five Smiles in the mountains south and west of Carlgara, on the island’^ north coast.  American fighters covering the air strike on the Japanese convoy off Ormoc shot down 16 enemy ?Oanes and probably destroyed five mhers, MacArthur said. Maj. Richard I. Bong of Poplar. Wis.. Americas top ace. knocked down an enemy plane to raise his total to 34.  American losses were four bombas and four fighters.  American planes hit Paramu-shiru Monday, sinking two barges, Nimltz said. Two days later Army and Navy planes struck again at Paramushiru and other Kuriles Islands, while Ok on Tuesday and Wednesday the airmen • raided from the Bonin and Volcano islands southeast of Japan, to the Marianas, farther south.  Against jubilant Japanese claims  tat Kweilin and Liuchow In south-stem China had fallen at last to a month’s long-enemy campaign to cut China in two, Chungking military headquarters said only that Kweilin was encircled and Liuchow was sorely threatened. ^The Japanese news agency Domei broadcast from Tokyo a frontline story that Kweilin was captured Friday and that the defending Chinese army had surrendered.  The enemy radio earlier reported that Liuchow, 95 miles south-fSkst of Kweilin and site of the last u. S. air base in that part of CJïlna, so far as Is known, had been captured.  Throngs Join In Capital's FDR Welcome  WASHINGTON, Nov. 10 — _ President Roosevelt rode back to the White House and a fourtli term today along raln-puddlcd Pennsylvania Avenue, jammed from curb to building line with drenched but cheering citizens.  The improptu homecoming party attracted 250,000 persons, traffic chief William A. Von Duzer estimated as his men colled up four and a half miles of rope and cable which were stretched along the parade route to hold the president's well-wishers on the sidewalks.  “This Is a very wonderful welcome home you have given me." the president said when his big open car paused briefly at the Columbus fountain In Union Station plaza. He grinned, took off ills dripping hat, and waved cheerily to the crowd.  Vice President Wallace and Senator Truman, who will succeed to that office Jan. 20, huddled in raincoats beside Mr. Roosevelt in the back seat. Up front beside the driver perched Young Johnny Bocttlger, the president's grandson.  The rain which had spattered briskly on acres of varl-colored umbrellas slackened as the president’s car purred out of the station on the final lap of his trip from Hyde Park. N. Y.  Fifty motorcycle policemen deployed in a V-for-Victory formation to clear the route for the president’^ procession.  Mr. Roosevelt’s personal and official families greeted him In his private car soon after it rolled in from Hyde Park. Mrs. Roosevelt's limousine followed the president's automobile, along with other automobiles bearing cabinet members and other high governmental officials.  Bands tooted merrily throughout the creeping 20 minute drive to the White House. Bounding banners proclaimed: "In ‘44 We Need You More’’ and “You're Back and We’re Back of You.”  The schools let out the youngsters for the celebration. Government girls trooped out of the vast departmental buildings, and a paratrooper back from the war climbed high on a monument for n glimpse of his commander in chief.  Two 'teen-age girls stood on a downtown curb.  “I remember the very first time I saw .President Roosevelt.” one of them reminisced.  “¡Mother had to hold me up In arms so I could sec him. Do you remember the first time you ever saw him?”  “Golly no,” her companion replied. **How old do you think I am, for goodness sake.'*  IN ARMISTICE DAY PARADE TODAY—Among the many colorful features of Abilene’s eight-section parade in celebration of the 25th anniversary of signing of the Armistice ending World War I will be this display of the American flag  and those of all the United Nations, which will lead the Army Service Forces Training ccnter contingents. (Reporter-News Photo),  Parade to Feature Holiday Here  Honoring the heroes of two world conflicts, Abilene’s third wartime Armistice Day obser\’ance will include a general holiday for workers, a colorful parade and football game today and a memorial service on Sunday.  The parade starts at 10:45 a.m. at Eighth and Chestnut and will proceed north on Chestnut through the underpass at South First, north on Pine to Fifth, west to Cypress, south to North First, then west to Orange where it will disband.  At 11 a.m. the parade will halt while taps is played, a short prayer is said and a salute i» presented to departed soldiers.  The Abilene Army Air Field band fill present a 45-minute concert starting at 10 a.m. in front of the posc-officc building just before the parade.  Thirty-five overseas veterans of Camp Barkeley will carry 35 flags of the United Nations during the parade. Decorated heroes also arc  to march in the eight-section procession. Representatives of three colleges, highway patrolmen, war veterans, GI's on foot and In army vehicles, high school bands and pep squads, service clubs. Gold Star mothers, scouts and other local groups directly or Indirectly connected with the war. will be in the parade.  Abilene stores and city offices are observing a full holiday. The post-office will be open until 1 p.m.  A large crowd is expected to turn out this afternoon at 2:30 for the Abilenc-Lamesa roothall tussle at Eagle stadium.  Families of war casualties living in the area surrounding Abilene will be honored during a memorial program Sunday at the high school auditorium. The program will start at 3 p.m. Personnel from Camp Barkeley and Abilene citizens will join In the program. The public  Nation, Allies To Honor Dead  By The Associated Press This nation and Its Allies pay tribute today to the soldiers, known and unknown, -of this and other wars, who fought or fight that freedom might prevail.  Although enemies once thought subdued still plague the world, the  FOUR STATES GIVE FDR BIGGER VOTE THAN '40  By the Associated Press^^ Allh<i&gh ’ the*"*r>e7Tcy-Tioosevelt contest was the tightest presidential race since 1916 In popular vote, five states gave the president a significance oi Armistice Day, Nov.    plurality than they did In  year’s ballot total will not reach that of 1940, there-are ,still thou-saiids of service ballots to be added from states which arranged delayed counts, as well as the civilian votes in unreported precincts.  11. 1918. will be recalled in the midst of another war to honor tlie victorious warriors of that struggle and to say a pray who carry on their battles now.  ' President Roosevelt will journey to Arlington National cemctcry.  here America's unknown soldier lies sleeping in a marble tomb on the sloping banks of the Potomac.  look on as his aides lay a WTeath upon the not-forgotten stone, guarded day and night by armed sentries.  Patriotic organizations also will participate in ceremonies at the un-known Soldiers tomb marking the 26th anniversary of that November day when the Allie.«; and Germany brought an end to a four years’ w'ar and a world went delirious at the thought of peace.  Paris, torn since then by the turmoil of another war. will not forget that distant Armistice Day eith-  Today American Army and Navy forces will Join with Fi-ench and Allied troops in a massive parade.  And on the tomb of France's Un-know'n Soldier. General Charles de Gaulle will lay a wreath, shortly before cannon signalize the beginning of a minute’s silcuce throughout France.  1940.  Tlie «¡tates where the president got a bigger preference over Gov. for "those 1 Thomas E. Dewey than he did over i ' Wendell L. Willkie. the 1940 G. O. I P. nominee, are Illinois. Michigan. { Minnesota, New York and Rhode | Island.  Willkie carried Michigan by 6 -926 votes. Wliile the vote Ls not yet complete, indications are tliat the president won the state this year by at>out 30.000.  Chest Donations $9,839 Over Goa  Taylor county’s War Shest drive was officially clo.sed last night with a grand total. $76,975.18 far exceed-Here are the president's winninc ing the $67.136 quota set here Oct. margins in the other four state.s in 10.  the two elections, based on unofii- Gifts received yesterday totaled ciai or incomplete returns:    , S4.136.68. the major donation com-  Tllinois — Over Willkie, 102.694: . ;ng from officers and men of ASF-over Dewey 142.384.    TC, Camp Barkeley, with rivillan  Minnesota — Over Willkie. 37.-, personnel, which amounted to 922: over Dewey. 51.084.    $3.762.28.  New York — Over Willkie, 224.- Fifty-nine of the 86 groups had Dowey. 44.706.    failed to meet their quota.s. figures  showed. Rural communitir.s as a  Parades, Prayers In Texas Holiday  by the ASSOCIATED PRESS  Armed might, prayers for peace, mémorial-«ervlces for the war dead, and fobtball games mark the observance of Armistice day in Texas today.  Veterana of the two World Wars march in military pnmnps In Dnün.«!. Hou.ston, Port WoriJi and other major cities.  Memorial servirr.s were planned today and tomorrow throughout the state, in country churches and city temóles.  Àt Pari.s, in the courj^e of the memorial sorvires, thr Silver Star  Allies Near Saar Valley  By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS  The Third Army’s winter offensive blazed over a 75-mile front yesterday and tanks and infantry, curving around little more than eight miles southeast of the great fortress of Metz, were within 21 miles of thé frontier of the Saar basin, German industrial stronghold.  The Germans struck back  for gallantry posthumously Boyle, who .s division, wa«; his mother. ?  Other ohsc those at:  Lubbock, wlirre Rep. George Mahon will be the sponker in a program sponsorrri by vrternns, with Gold Star mothor.s as sppcial Kuests.  1 nriion. awarded Capt. Gaine.s M. f'd with tlio 36tii ' br prrsentrd to I.ne M Roylp. ncrs wvU incUidc  FDR Confers With Cabine Sees Others  WASHINGTON. Nov. 10—i;p)~ President Roosevelt came back to Washington and a rousing welcome today and went to work on tough International problems at the desk where he'll do business four more  Amid the customary rumors that some of its members may be out of jobs, he called in his cabinet for its first post-election meeting.  And he saw Herbert Lehman, who runs the United Nations Relief and Rehabilitation program; John G. Winant, ambassador to London; and AvercU Harriman, his envoy to Mcs-  The dates with doplomats at the end of the day pointed up again the prospects of a second Roosevelt - Churchill - Stalin meeting to talk over final plans for crushing Germany and partial plans for keeping the world at peace later on.  Mr. Rcosevelt had no newa on such B conference. That was what he told reporters soon after he returned to the capital and a tumultuous reception by a quartcrmillion Washingtonians standing In a rain.  But he said the big three do want to meet when they cajrt, ar-• arigc It. Nothing'Jia.$ out yet, he said, and for security reasons he wasn’t going to announce it when arrangements were completed.  London conjectured that the president might come tliero, pick up Pnme Mmister Churchill, and move on to Paris and then to the Middle East nnd an appointment with the Soviet premier.  The chief executive was back in the White House for the first time-since he srt out a week ago to wind up hts camj)aign and await the outcome at iiis home at Hyde Park. N. Y.  'fhc Waslilngtf had promoted wrlrome to the r dent, addressed a itorial to him  n Post, which Wa.shington’» ^turning presi-front page ed-morning  whole rontributed $3.789 (¡uota of $5.000.  Some businesses and individuals liave made pledecs to be paid later til the ypar or next year which are not counted on the pre.srnt total.  Finn Government Quits, Swedes Hear  STOCKHOLM. Nov. 10    The  Swedist ncw’spapcr Morgontidnin-gen reported that the Finnisli government resigned tonight.  Finnish sources here said Pre>-ident Carl Gustav Von Manner-helm possibly would appoint a new cabinet tomorrow^  the president s popular vote marcin over Dew’ey stood la.st night at 3 -071.883. The count was Roosevolt 24,269.864: Dewey 21.197.981. Mr led 36 states with 4A2 riectoral votes and Governor Dewey 12 states with 99 electoral votes By compari.son. the presidrm'.«;    ■  popular vote margin over Willkie Aworcled DFC was 4.938.711 with Mr. Roosevelt receiving 27.243.466 votes and Wilikir 22.304.755. The president carried :^R States with 449 electoral votes and Willkie 10 states with 82.  Although intJlcations are that \h\s  Two football gai ternoon, anoth scheduled.  San Angelo, army post oj thf Concho, will fdi reviews by two cial.s.  Wichita Fiills memorial .srrvirf the dead of Wi rifle saluti> at for the ilPîid  wliich said the administratio was "suffering from operational fatigue.”  Hithejio. It said, thp prrsidrnt amiably had ignored olfrr.s of cHb-U*" are ^ rc.’-iRnations and thu.s you hav<-kept m war Jobs oiiiciwl.s who wprc frontier I    i^cace a.ssign-  of the Distinguished Fly-  viU ho  g Cm.': tos T'Sgt, James L. Tlio-    MrClosk  mas of Breckenridge was announr- , Temple.  last night b ythe War depart-nent.  fio.s and TO'.s, Fort tlip bi'ckdrop for ni.ijf^r Army offi-  wherp a ma.ss will ho hold for >rld War II, with T.Tps Hi 11 a. m, f W..rld \\';ir I. A ini’rci    tho bene-  py iicucmi hospital  menLs.'  Citi Post !  g Secretary Hull’s healt iiKge.sted iiuio inrîion f Secretaiy of Wa lifted to the st;u  : wero i mrnt Hoover adm)  I Declaring some admlni.strators had u.selulnf.<i.s. the papor mind .‘^urh official.>; S< Commnrrp Jones and Sv Labor Prrkins.  at two places north of Metz during the morning, the first counter-attacks since thé offensive broke, but they were repulsed. At one point (the Moselle river bridgehead at Koenigsmacher) the Americans .scored a three-mile gain. Koenigsmacher is six miles from the nearest German frontier and-10 miles from the Saar border.  <A front dispatch said the Sixth armored division, the second tank division to join afc least si.'« infantry divisions in the onslaught, pushed beyond Buchy, 10 miles southeast of Metz, and was operating less than nine miles from the fort-ringed city.)  At points along a 20-mile front southea.n of Metz, w^here the big push appeared to l^e gaining the greatest momentum, the Americans now were more than eight miles beyond the starting point of threo days ago without striking really strong resistance.  Ru.v;ian troops In a fierce allday struggle yesterday drove a wedge between the German defenders of Budapest and eastern Slovakia by cutting the Budapest — Mlskloc railway In the area of Mczokovesd, 65 miles notrheast of the besieged Hun.< garlan capital.  A midnight Soviet communique ' said the Ruslans killed 700 Germans and Hungarians, beat off a series of stubborn counter-attacks, captui;ed 15 guns, stores of ammunition and other equipment, and destroyed nine German tanks in tho ^ section, of  Mtàorovesd llfeelf was threatened by the Russians with tho capture of Borsodszemere, four miles to. the southwest and two miles front the railway which skirts the Matra monntaln.«: In north'‘astcrn Hungary. and tho Red army now was 20 miles beyond t!ie middle Tisza river which it crosscd several days ago in the new’ drive on Budapest.  Tlir American first aiiny received .strong .support from 1.400 U. S. heavy bcmber.s. which blasted military larcets and Industrial plants around Cologne and Frankfiu-t. Prime IVIinlstcr Churchill said that England i.<< under attack by the German long-range V-2 rt>rket. He toid commons casualties and damage “have so f.ir not been heavy.”  Tlio Gei*man radio said that the V-2 was boing fired against Paris and the harbor ln«^taUaUons at Antwrrp. Great Belgian port tlirouch which the Allied command planned to .supply its forces In the haUlr of Germany.  In Italy, the British Eighth Army raptured Forli. German-held fort-h. the res-s town 38 miles southe.'ist of Bolo-M woiUd ' cna, and pressed on against enemy Stun.soii linos along tiie Montonc river.  depart- ------——-----  In Ihf  Ei’ii Langford Funeral At Wilson Avenue  had  of  UP FRONT WITH MAULDIN  The Weather  Better Cotton  NEW ORLEANS. Nov. 10 —'/¿P'— Dr. Herman F. Mark, nationally known fiber expert, predicted hero today that the post war period w’ill see t>etter cotton Erown. improved cotton goods and new uses for cotton.  HIGHWAY 80 TO BE WIDENED AT ONCE  Paving on U. S. Highway 80, one of the nation’s most important t^nscontlnental routes, will be ^ened Imm^lately from 18 to 24 feet at cost of approximately $424,900 along 60 miles from Abilene to west of Colorado City, S. J. 'Trer.daway, division e'.ght highway engineer, announced yesterday.  prospect Is a heavy maln-tShance emergency job for which materials have been allocated by lae War production board.  Treadaway pointed out that the 18-foot concrete paving, most of It built 15 to 20 years ago, has taken "jSa. awful beating** during the war ^li lifting of load liml,ts.  Until two years ago there was a 7,900-pound load limit on highways In Texas. This was lifted and now. by special permit, loads as high %|L 90,000 pounds, mostly War de^ ]$lHment hauling, &re conunon-  place on the cardinal roads.  “The highway 80 route is one of the most heavily traveled now, as Jt was in peace lime,” said Treadaway. '*It Is obsolete and must t>e widened and improved as an emergency measure.”  No emergency work of this kind is planned on highway 80 east of Abilene because plans are eventually to rebuild tills section entirely.  The wider paving will have 10-foot shoulders, said the division engineer.  The work will extend from Abilene through Merkel, Trent, Sweetwater, Roscoe. Loraine, Colorado City and Westbrook, except for 18 miles in Mitchell county, which Is of asphalt surface. This will be hanilled separately to bring, to  the 24-foot width. The concrete extends to eight miles ca.st of the Howard county line at latan. Mitchell county. The la.st eight miles in Mitchell county was widened just before the war’s restrictions on construction went into effect.  Treadaway also disclosed that contract for construction of highway 84 from the junction .with highway 83 fourteen miles south of Abilene to Coleman county will be awarded the first week In December. Right-of-way for the new, straightened and widened, highway Is being obtained by Taylor county. Laying of asphalt surfacing on 4. miles of highway 25 from its northern terminus at Abilene municipal airport will begin next week said Treadaw’ay. This will make Highway 36 an all-weather route from Abilene to Cross Plains and beyond*  Jasrph W. I.angford, 78. resident of 1249 Chr.stnut. died at 2:40 p. in Friday in an Abilene hospital after an ilinos.«; of six or seven  month.’’.  Funoi;*l will be at 4 p. m. today in tho WiV^on Avenue Church of Christ wHl', Tommio Williams and Holh.s .Swnfford ofificating. Burial in Cedar Hill will be directed by WJlliotf.s fimcral home.  Pallbearers will be J. M. Huddle-><ton. Obie Cami^bell. Jewel Swafford. .Toe Duke. Darrell Westmoreland and Fred Newman.  Suniving Mr. Langford are his m.    ; wife. Mrs! Ellen Langford; five  A .son. to Cpl and Mr.«: pobort D ' daughters. .Mr.s, W. T. Talley of £attl'r. 2957 South I'r. at 7 26 p. IShen; Mr.s. E, C. Dossett of Plain-m,    iview. Mrs. E. H. Finch. Mrs. Walter  A daufihrer. tn .Sc!- nndMri^ John ' Jonr^: and Mrs. C M Nichols. ,all E, Brown, 2600 South at p. m. I of Abilene: a son. Fred Langford.  A daughter, to pvt. and Mrs. j stationed in England with the Arm-Carlos E. Tonev, Rt. I, Hawlev, at i ed forces; a brother. J. H. Langford 11:37 a. m. ’    i of pampa; Mrs. Emmie Steele of  A daughter, to Mr. and F. M. Muskogee. Okla.; 15 grandchUdren Mosley. 1218 North 15th, at 11 ;.^5 i and five great grandchildren.  j Seven More Babies Born at Hospital  Seven babie.s. hitl Kiai.: a ''r twin.s, were born at Uondri ks M i>iial iio.spiinl Kriclav b'-Jnro K i b. Nine babie.s woio b'in In hospital Thur.sdav,  The tv.in.s aie babv giils br>j' Capt. and Mr.*- H. C Mullo’  : Highland, at 6 ().-> and »i .0 n :n A son. to .Mr and Mi.s Mjx Wil-liarn-s. 1430 South 12tii. at 8 12 p  LOCAL MEN TOLD CONVERSION PLANS  Abilene manufacturers holding contracts with the government were urged Friday to keep records up to date and be ready with termination plan.s when war programs are stopped.  Nine clothing and machine manu-facturer.s from Abilene attended a meeting Friday afternoon arranged by the chamber of commerce in conjunction with the Smaller War Plants corporation and members of the Armed forces.  Attending were Arch D. Batjer for T. S. Lanlcfcrd and Sons. J. B. Dalton for Abilene Machinc Co., E. E. Brown and R. M. White for H. N. White Co.. E. J. Berry of the War Manpower commission, W.  S. Lankford and Guy W. McCarty for Tomlee Sportswear. Marshall Boykin and O. S. Burkett, accountants.  Russell Smith, district manager for the Smaller War Plants corporation. presided over the meeting, stressing that although many Anny contracts would terminate with victory in E^jrope. manufacturers were by no means to slow up on the job.  Lt. John liorwood presented an overall picture of termination, explaining four documents: the manufacturers contract with its termination article, the contract settlement ate, joint termination regulations, and technical manual which explains teiminatlon claims.  I Lieutenant Norwood discussed financial settlement, listing thafc^ w'hlch will be settled by the Army or the Navy contractor, such as expense of termination including ; coverage of raw materials and work ; in process.  ‘The government’s objective is speedy payment and prompt return ; of the manufacturer to civilian pro-;^ duction,” Lieutenant Norwood sald.A  Capt. Charles Finnegan, auditor, discussed items which the govern--^ ment will or will not„pay for, tides must be properly Identified; with charge, and information; ir be provided for the luturei.'! chaser,’.' he said.   

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