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Abilene Reporter News: Wednesday, November 1, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - November 1, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                NIWS FEATURISj TELEMATS) in this paper EVENING FINAL "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR; FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL. LXIV, NO. 136 TEXAS: NEWSPAPER ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 1, 1944 PAGES Associated Press (AP) United Press (UP.) PRICE FIVE CENTS vyKayo anesin Destruction Pace Equals Plant Output U. S. PACIFIC FLEET HEADQUAKTERS, Nov. fliers, paced by an ace who downed nine on one mission to Ma- nila, destroyed from to 2.846 Japanese planes during two months American troops invaded Palau and the Philippines and the Navy crushed the enemy's imperial fleet. f he Aug. 31-Oct. 31 scourge of foe's air power in sweeps ex- tending from the Philippines north to within 200 miles of Japan vir- tually nullified work of the enemy's assembly lilies for the period and cut deep into her store of battle- ttfiSed pilots. Adm, Chester W. Nimitz, is- suing this "conservative recap- itulation of enemy aircraft x said the cost was ap- proximately 300 carrier planes ratio of better than eight nine to one in favor of the Tanks. These achievements, it should be emphasized, are those of Third and Seventh fleet carrier fliers alone. not take into account for same period a noteworthy bag bJftArmy fliers who found the hunt- ing good over such hotly-defended spots as the oil center of Balikpapan on Borneo. Showing the way for the Navy is Comdr. David McCampbell, Los Angeles with 30 planes to credit, including nine he got in less than two hours Oct. 24 when he helped chase a num- erically superior group of Jap- anese all the way to Manila. His bag that day might even been 11. Two were list- ed as probables. Sharply underscoring Japan's de- terioration as an air as well as a naval power, the carrier raiders blew up of the enemy planes before they could get off the ground, even they attacked such strong- points as Formosa and the network of fields at Manila. The planes definitely were destroyed. The other 252 were list- ed as probably destroyed or dam- aicd. Helping the invasion of Peleliu" in southern Palau, the carrier raiders of the Third fleet shot down 362 planes and destroyed 534 more aground between Sept. 9-24 on Pa- and the Philippines. TXifc. 10 to 16, when Adm. Wil- liam F. Halsey's fleet opened up with sledgehammer blows against Ryukyus, 'Formosa and the Philip- pines to prepare for Gen. Douglas invasion of Lcyte, 528 planes were shot down, 304 "more wiped out on parked air- dromes. FDR Address to .ake 15 Minutes WASHINGTON, Nov. 1 President. Roosevelt's radio address from the White House tomorrow night will take up only 15 minutes of a half-hour political program 8 p. m., Hthe White House said today the remainder of the program will be filled in by the Democratic national committee. Otto to Europe Nov. Lon- don Daiiy Mail said today in a New York dispatch that Archduke Otto of Hapsburg, pretender to the throne of Austria, has left the Uni- ted States secretly _by plane for Eur- The Mail did not give the scurce of its information. eterans (Apply to War Manpower Commission, 1141 North placed since Sept. 1 109 Veterans placed yesterday 3 Interviewed yesterday. 4 Route to other agencies since Sept. 1 9 yesterday 4 Jobs listed 168 JAP WARSHIPS UNDER great Japanese battlewagon Yamato (top photo) shudders under two direct bomb hits from' Helldiver horaber of the U. S. Pacific fleet's fast carrier force as it fled under full steam through Tables straits in-western Vise- yans, Philippine islands. Bottom photo shows a large Japanese carrier, probably the Zui- kaku or the Shckaku, under full steam and throwing up huge quantities of smoke as it tried vainly to avoid bombs. That flattop, heeled over and sank in the Philippine battle. (U. S. Navy Photos from NEA YANK COLUMNS CLOSE FOR FINAL LEYTE BATTLE GENERAL Mac ARTHUR'S HEADQUARTERS Philippines. Nov. Two American fOrCcS closed on the strategic coastal village, of Carigara today, both massed for a climatic battle and braced for a possible Japanese counterattacks. Having cleared the rest o f Leylc valley of organized enemy resistance, the Americans were within eight miles of the vil- lage on the inland route from Jaro and only five miles away or. the coastal road from Bar- ujo. The Japanese mast stop both legs of the American ad- vance or lose their last strate- gic base northeast of Leyctc's man-killing, heavily junglcd hogback. If they fail to stop the attacks, whigh might reach the village to- day, they must drop back along a 5th Hurls Back Heavy Attacks ROME, Nov. army forces have improved their beach- head across the Ronco river south of the Po valley stronghold of Forli and have cleared the Germans from Meldola on the stream's bank. Allied headquarters announ- ced today. German troops facing the Fifth army on the central sec- tor south of Bologna were thrown into a scries of heavy counterattacks yesterday in an effort to wipe out several Allied salients. American forces, some- times fightinjr hand to hand, hurled them all back. Only patrolling and artillery duels occurred elsewhere. Medium bombers attacked brid- ges in the Po valley and lighter craft shot up enemy concentrations and communications. A small force of heavy bombers attacked targets iti Yugoslavia. single escape route, skirting the coast to Pinamopoan, only spot from -which they might negotiate a winding trail over the mountains to the south. This trail has been the route of Japanese reinforce- ments brought from Ccbu via Or- moc bay; and the forces in the north must reverse their travel on tho. same treacherous road or face annihilation. No goori port lies west of Pinamapoan on the coast, a no only a trail leads even to the scattered villages in that mountain- ous sector. The two American forces both grained ground yesterday. The 24th division moved northwest of captured Jaro for three miles, slowed there when it met a, strong Japanese road block, but jrathcred force late in the day to whittle dowr: the des- perate enemy opposition and resume its advance. The 24th now is less than eight miles from the village and is moving along a, good highway. On the coast. First cavalry I sion units moved "west: from cap- tured Burigo, less than five miles from' the next objective. That a battle for the village was certain was indicated by the con- tinued flow of Japanese reinforce- ments north over the mountains and by the strong si and the de- fenders were making with v o a, d block against both American forces, j The probability of a. counterattack j was stressed by Maj. Gen. Franklin j O. Sibert, the 10th corps (of which the 24th division is a He expected at least j one1 Japanese attempt, within the! few days to stop the Amerl- can advance by frontal assault, i This could even develop into one' of the familiar Banzai chants mot so often before when a Japanese' force was compressed into a small; area. I 'A delayed dispatch from Leif i Erickson on Leyte disclosed for! tne first time that Marine artillery- I men are participating the ?'cr. of the Artillery of: trie 24th corps is made up o! both Army and Marine Abilene merchants are being con- tacted this week by an .Army sal- vage representative .to urge that they separate paper from trash and cany it to the paper salvage pen, located on South 1st and Locust as a temporary, measure, Capt. Nor- man Turnbull, Camp Barkcley sal- vage officer, said this morning. "We need that paper badly, and since many of the firms have trucks of their own, it would not bo difficult to do for a short time. Quite a few of the local merchants have already followed this plan, "This plan would only be neces- sary until the city can hire a man to pick up the paper. Mayor W, W. Hair has informed us that, an ex- tra truck is available for such work, and that only the hiring of such a worker remains to be Captain Turnbull added. Army salvage trucks will tour the downtown area Saturday, picking up paoer. Sunday they will canvass the residential sections. China Keeps Silent On Stilwel! Recoil CHUNGKING. Nov. Chinese; Minister of Information Liang Han-Chao tola foreign cor- respondents today that the recall of Gen. Joseph XV. otihvell to Wash- ington was purely a military mat- ter and for that reason no com- ment would be forthcoming here. "Inasmuch as this is a military change of military per- have no statement to make." Liang: replied in response to a query at a prc.ss conference. Crash Fafaf to Air Base Piiof A plane crash Tuesday a, short distance north of Abilene Army air base fatal 2ti Lt. Robert L. Kuhl, 23, of Corning, Iowa. The lieutenant, who was on com- bat training flight, was the ,con of Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence A. Kuhl of Corning, Aft Confused OnB29Blow By the Associated Press Tokyo radio spluttered for hours today about a B-29 Su- perfortress raid on the Japa- nese capital, hut the War de- partment in Washington said it had "no information ahout any aerial operations over Ja- pan." Tokyo has not been hit by American bombs in more than two years. In a series of confused re- ports, Tokyo radio said a B- 29, apparently from a newly developed base in the Ma- rianas islands appeared over the capital but left "without attempting that sev- eral four enginer planes were over the city; that at least one plane raided a factory district throwing workers into confu- sion. The reports all agreed that an enemy plane or planes were over the Tokyo area around 1 p. m. Wednesday (Tokyo One broadcast, recorded by the Federal Communications commis- sion, giving detailed instructions-on combatting fires inflamable To- kyo, said "an enemy plane suddenly raided part of the Kanto an important industrial area cover- ing the entire area around the cap- ital and embracing several prefec- tures. "Several enemy four-motored bombers" roared over the capital .at m. but were driven first Tokyo report said. "A'later broadcast, recorded by the Associated Press, said: "Latest reports disclose only" one enemy plane, a B-29 bomber, .and not two as believed earlier, appear- ed over Tokyo early this after- Half an. hour later, the broadcast continued, "without at- tempting attacks, the enemy plane fled in a southerly The contradiction o? succeed- ing reports recalled the confu- sion among Tokyo broadcasters when Lt. Gen. James H. Doo- littlc's bombers struck the city, April 18, 1042. This is 'the first report of American planes over the" city since then. At, the time of the Marianas in- vasion there was much speculation that engineers would build a huge on Saipan for Tokyo-raiding B-29s. There has never been any confirmation that such a base was developed. Neither China-based Supcrforts nor any other land-based bombers have previously been reported over Tokyo. Tokyo announcers issuing de- tailed fire precaution instruc- tions, and warned "Japanese liomcs arc firctraps. An air raid alarm was sounded, and the "air defense central head- quarters" issued instructions con- cerning an "enemy raid." The broadcasts first reported the planes were driven away by fight- ers, "before they could do any mis- chief." Later, Tokyo radio reported "an enemy plane suddenly raided part of the Kanto an important 'industrial area on the southeastern side of metropolitan Tokyo. It added, "the plane is Be- lieved to have come from an American base in the Marian- as." Americans hold air bases on Saipan, Tinian and Guam in that group. Japs Claim Landing On Coast of Peleliu By The Associated Press A Japanese imperial communique today claimed that Japanese as- sault troops landed on the north toast of Peleliu, an American-con- quered island in the southern Pal- sii5, at dawn Wednesday (Japanese The communique, picked up in a broadcast recorded by the Federal Communications com- mission, asserted "a special torpedo assault un5t" attacked an American convoy cast of the Peleliu while the landing was being made. It said four U. S. transports were sunk and two others heavily dam- aged. I Most of the Palau islands, some J 500 miles east of the Philippines, j were left in Japanese hands by U. i S. invasion forces which took over the southern islands in the group i m September. Paris Alerted PARIS, Nov. The Paris" area had a brief ail' alarm today, its first since the Allied occupation :f Aug. 25, the alert, and all-c'.ear sounding after explosions were heard. communications center of the nation, it is hub of Japanese railways, the heart of business and governmental administration, Unimportant industrially before 1931, it now holds many new war industries, including greatly expanded machine tool plants. of the new industrial city that mushroomed along bay coast between Tokyo and Yokohama after conquest of Manchuria. Most of its many factories are including two of Japan's best oil refineries. Has its own harbor. port for deep-sea shipping. Has two large shipyards, tank and tractor factories; five oil f-jfineries, including two with nation's largest output; chemical and machine tool plants. former fishing village, it is now great naval base, with city almost exclusively supported by Navy. SjfSea of Japan IMG A PAN UNDER radios babbled that the Tokyo metropolitan area (above) was1 under attack today for the first time since Lt. James H. Doolittle's raid of April 18, 1942, There was no Allied confirmation of the report. P.M. LAW AUSTIN, Nov. M. Law Harrison will'not succeed Law as president of..the board of directors of Texas A. M. college for 22 years and a member of the board for 28 years, resigned.'today and Governor Ccke R. Stevenson appointed Ervin W. Harrison, South Bend farmer to the board. South Bend, is in Young county. The governor also announced ap- pointment' of Dr. C. O. Terrell of Fort Worth to the board of regents cf the University of Texas in suc- cession to the late Dr. K. H. Ayncs- worth of Waco. Dr. Terrell is pres- ident of the Medical Alumni as- sociation of the university. Bond Sales Now Count on Drive War bonds purchased from today through December will count en the Sixth" War Loan Drive which will open Chairman C. M. Caldwell announc- ed today. Sales of the Abilene postofficc and the two city banks during Oc- tober. a month in which emphasis was placed on tho War Chest cam- paign, came to it was reported today. Reports from the Federal Reserve bank on outside pay- rolls and other purchases cred- ited to the county, as well as complete reports from issuing agencies over the. county, arc expected to push the total up near the monthly quota of 200, Caldwell said. Federal Reserve reports come be- tween' the 8th and 15th of the month. In the Sixth War Loan drive t.he county ha.s been pivcn a quota of for Scries E bonds and and overall quota of president of the A. 
                            

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