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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: September 14, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - September 14, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                QPfe gbilene "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL. LXIV, NO. A TEXAS 1-U, NIWSPAMS ABILENE, TEXAS, THURSDAY MORNING, SEPTEMBER 14, 1944 -TWELVE PAGES Associated Pras (AP) Putted Ptai PRICE FIVE CENTS azis May Be Fleeing to Rhine Demos Vote M Elector Purge t Japan Loses 100 Planes f By The Associated Press Navy carrier planes let at. the western central Philip pine islands of Panay, Cebu and Negros -Monday in a con tinning attack that already has destroyed at least 200 eneni planes, several cargo ships and smaller craft. This was the second carrier based raid on the Philippine ft three days. The Japanese air force was giving stiff oppbsi lion. Fifty Nipponese planes were shot down and'more tha: 150 destroyed on the ground. .Adm. Chester W. Nimitz said that preliminary reports indicated fh action was continuing. There was no mention of American plane losse- Destruction of the planes on the ground probably means that th 9e fleet of Adm. William F Halsey hit Capiz airfield on Panay, 21 miles from Manila. Halsey's powerful Third fleet, three days ago, san or damaged 89 Japanese cargo ships and destroyed 68 planes in wide spread raids on Mindanao's five airfields and her iron and timber port There was no mention in yesterday's communique of the attemp In the past ten days by Navy planes and warships to obliterate Japa nese defenses on Palau. But ther v Violent Storm ?o Strike East MIAMI, Pla., Sept. dangerous hurricane of great inten stty and wide area headed towar nd tonight and the weather bu au reported that the storm 'cen ter "should reach the NorUi Caro Una coast in the vicinity of Cherr> Point early Thursday forenoon." In a 10 p. m. advisory, the weafch er bureau warned residents of low jKlng areas on .the North Carolin Shd Virginia coasts, 1( Chesapeake bay to "depart imme diately for higher terrain." The center of the whirling; winds, some estimates up to 140 miles an hour, was report- fed to be about 300 miles east .of Brunsirick, Ga. As the worst tropical storm c the past several years conttnue( its north northwest or northwaK movement toward the coast, hur- ricane warnings were hoisted from 0yrtle Beach, S. C., to the Vir- ginia capes. Storm warnings were displayei from Myrtle beach southward to Savannah, Ga., and north of the Virginia Capes to Atlantic City. A hurricane alert was extended to Eastport, Me. The emergency advisory said tha "winds will begin to increase to the Atlantic coast, Charleston north- ward, shortly after midnight, reach- ing hurricane force -north of Wil- V. C. "Gales will extend over interior eastern North Carolina and North- ward Thursday. Returning On Exchange Ship WASHINGTON, Sept. The War department today an- the names of 233 sick or wonnded Army officers and enlist- ed men, former prisoners of war of Germany, who are en route to the United States aboard the Sweedish motorship Gripsholm fol- an exchange of prisoners at otesburg, Sweden. The ship is due to arrive in the United States late this month. After physical examinations, the returning soldiers will be granted leave or furlough, if physical con- permits, or continued hos- pitalization for those requiring it. Pay accounts will be settled in full upon their arrival, and any decorations or awards authorized will be presented. The returning soldiers, with names 7nd addresses of next of kin, In- clude: James E. P. Collins, .sergeant, air Birtie P. Collins, wife, Odessa. "tote Demo Body Awaiting Reaction DALLAS. Sept. new Democratic sUte executive com- mittee today in its first session vot- ed to wait to see what public re- action to the convention was, then meet afiain in Dallas at a date to be set later. Harry L. Seay, chairman, told the members tha.t vas the duty pro-Roosevelt Democrats to or- ganize "down to your very pre- cincts" in order to produce the heaviest vote In history in Novem- ber. were air strikes ranging from th northern Kuriles to Nauru, almos on the equator, by Navy and Arm; planes. The Knrlle raids on four islands Paramushiro, Shum- ushu, Aralto and resulted in the sinking of a medium sized Japanese cargo vessel and four smaller ones in Shumushu harbor and bomb hits on two" more cargo vessels at Paramushiro. Navy nlanes and Army Mitchells VALENTINE, Nebr., Sept. 13. Asserting: that Gen. Douglas MacArthur "no longer is a political threat tt, Mr. Qoy. .Thomas E. proposed today Southwest Pacific "ffiven greater scope and recog- nition" in the creation of an over all Pacific command." staged .the far north raids Sunday and Monday. They were Intercept- ed at Shumushu by seven Japanese planes, which damaged one Arm; Mitchell. One enemy plane was shol 'awn east of Onnekotan. Today's communique by Genera' MacArthur told of a 125-ton bomb raid on Halmahera island airfields One small freighter and three coastal vessels were sunk in that vicinity. Southwestern Pacilic air patrols lombed an airdrome at Zamboanga, west of Davao on Mindanao. Sailor Injured SWEETWATER, Sept. of a Dikins Van and Storage truck of Dallas was ser- ously injured and an unidentified sailor going home on a surprise leave received n broken eg Wednesday night around )'clock when the truck plowed off a bridge eight miles east of here. I'apers on the trucker gave his name as Floy Myrick. He was unconscious last night and was said by attendants at the Sweetwater hospital to have severe head injuries. Tlie sailor refused to give his name, stating he was .on his way lome after two years overseas ervice and did not want his par- nts to be notified of his injury. He is being treated in the Sweet- hospital by an Avenger field urgeon. The truck, loaded with household urnishings en route from Los An- cles, Calif, to Dallas, fell some 15 eet into the river bed. FD Backers Certify Own Elector List DALLAS, Sept. Texas militant Roosevelt De mocrats today shouted appro val of resolutions setting u machinery by which the stat convention hopes to purge th party presidential elector who will not support Roose velt and Truman. It certified for filing with the secretary of state, a new slsfe of electors, specifically instruct- ing them to cast their votes for the national nominees. The resolution specifically direct ed the secretary of state to expune the list of electors filed by th regular convention, and substitut for it a new slate which iucludec seven of the original electors wh lad said they would vote for Roose Felt and Truman. The position of those drop- ped was characterized in the resolution as "defiant and con- temptible." The convention voted approva 3f a resolution revoking, repealing and annulling the resolutions pass d by the regular convention May 3, under which its electors were not bound to support the party nominees unless the Chicago con vention acceded to certain demands which it- turned down. These in .luded demands for. a white su- premacy plank t and Jo restoration at 1 p. after an unprecedented two day session.. The resolution on electors declar- d that the action of the May con- ention would have the effect o: epriving Democrats of their vote n the general election, and :-efu- al by the electors to .vote for the army's candidates "would violate lie public policy of the- state" and he rights of Texans In the armec orces to vote for Roosevelt and Truman. In the absence of statutes relating to electors, the resolu- tion continued, the party is left free to act upon the matter. Jl held that the majority of the nominees have forfeited and vacated their offices as nom- inees for presidential electors and should be removed. Another resolution ourt action in the elector battle to the new executive ommittee which was overwhclm- igly pro-Boosevelt, "all power and uthority to fill vacancies in of- lings that the convention could cers and nominees" and do all if had recessed instead of ad- See DEMOS, fg. II, Col. 7 'WISE, GOOD MAN' DALLAS, Sept. platform anfl resolutions com- mittee today recommended to the Democratic state convention resolution commending Gov- ernor Coke R. Stevenson's ad- ministration and declaring Stevenson to be "a wise and good man." Seconding- the motion for unanimous approval of the rec- ommendation was Mrs, Minnie Fisher Cunningham of New Wavcrry, Stevenson's principal opponent in the Democratic primary election. Romania Gets in LONDON, Sept. Moscow radio announced tonight that Romania, under the newly-ef- fected armistice with the Altics, will enter the war against Germany throwing in 12 infan- try divisions. GERMAN PRISONERS soldiers, captured when the .British took the Belgian port of .Antwerp, are marched to a Prisoner-of-War enclosure under guard of their captors. In the background is the Antwerp Central Station. This is a British offi- cial photo. (AP FDR Will Speak On Radio Oct. 5 CHICAGO, Sept. denfr Koosevelt will make a '.cam paign speech on the night of Ocl in a broadcast directed to meet ings of party workers gathered in every voting district of the coun ;ry, Democratic National Chairman Robert E. Hannegan announced- t day. Hannegan, who billed the scheduled address as the Pres- ident's "second nationwide ciimgajfn 'said that listening audiences would be arranged in more tban voting areas in the 48- stales. He added that a minimum or 1( persons would be gathered around sets in homes or other places. The party chairman said that under the plan one worker in each district would Invite 10 neighbors his home to listen to the presi- dent. After the broadcast, he con- inued, each of the persons will be given a list of registered voters and vill be asked to get those voters to the" polls on election day. Hauncg-an announcer! that before or after the President's speech- the networks would be split up so that in each state the Democratic governor or Democratic candidate for gov- ernor or for a senate seat could speak to the listening1 groups in that state. Also speaking on -the national lookup will be Hannegnn and Mrs. Gladys A. Tillctt. assistant nation- .1 chairman. The broadcast will legin at 9 p.m. Abilene war time. 5ond Reduced for Tommy Dorseys Reds Reach Czech Line; Lomza Falls LONDON, Sept. ned army reached the Czechoslovak border below Krosno in. a flaring new offensive in southern Polanc today and conquered the stubborn WPB'Relyi Reich Collapse WASHINGTON, Sept. London reports that planners of the United States war effort hud figured Oct. 31 as the "outside date1' of German collapse brought from War Production Board offi- cials tonight the comment they were ready lor the end of European hos- matter how early vic- tory occurs. An Associated Press dispatch from London quoted a respon- sible non-British source as say- ing the Oct. 31 date had been pinpointed by the WPB after consultations -with military sources in working out plans to make a partial change from war to civilian production. J. A. Krug, acting chairman of WPB, declined to comment on the report but other officials of the igency said they were prepared to irder promptly the lifting of most government controls on industry, in accordance with the general recon- version pattern announced last week. Other government sources said rmy authorities recently withdrew heir opposition to public convcr- ion planning because of a. feeling ANGELES, Sept. ;and Leader Tommy Doreey and is wife, Pat Dane, and Alien miley, Hollywood figure, curren- ered today in superior court on an that the end" of the war with Ger- idictment charging them with fel- many is reasonably close, nious assault on Actors Jon Hall nd Eddie Morris. On motion of their attorney, their ail was reduced from each anfl formal booking, fin- erprinting and photographing for he county jail record were waived. OP Head Hails Action by Demos DALLAS, Sept. W. hilp, chairman of the state Repub- lican executive committee, said to- day "our most ambitious hopes are that the work of the May Demo- cratic convention will be complete- ly undone by the Roosevelt In an interview given the Dallas I News, Philip said "with the New [Deal element in control, we will have a clear-cut path for Dcwey and Bricker before us." Turkish Foreign Minister Named ANKARA, Sept. WVrHasan Saka. former finance minister find vice president of the Peoples' partv was named foreign minister of Tur- key today. At the same time Nurullah Esat Sumcr, former director of the Sumer bank, was appointed finance minister. ABILENIANS GET DEMO Dallas Scar- borough (left) was nmned pro-Roosevelt elector for (lie congressional district, replacing Fred Brown of liastlnnd. The new state executive committee included E. T. Brooks (right) for the 24tli senatorial district. Other member for the district wns Mrs. Irene Trapp, Swcctwater. Turn to Page 11 for full lists of electors and commiUccmcn. Americans Freed THIRD ARMY HEADQUART- ERS, Prance, Sept. hundred Americans, most of them women, have been freed from a German internment camp at Vlttcl. 18 miles southeast of Neufchate.iu. Some men nnd children were in Ihp group. Other nationalities including British were also liberated. Road to Berlin By The Associated Press, Russian Front: 312 miles (from outsitlc Western Trout: 319 miles (from cast of Eastern France: 440 miles (from below Italian Frnni: 583 miles (from below Sumners Honored CHICAGO, Sept. W Sumners, Dallas. Tex., chairman of the house of representatives' committee on the judlcary. tonight was awarded the American Bar as- sociation's annual medal "for con- spicuous service to ihe cause of American Jurisprudence." Ihe Weather U. S. DEPARTMENT Of rOMMEIUiF, WEATHER nmKAIJ ABII.EN'n A-VD VICI.MTV A.VD HAST Thursday. Friday par Mr rlourly, WEST cloudy Thun- duy ind frltUy. TEMPERATURES IVrd. Tuei. Wfd. Tuts. fortress of Lomza in northern Po- land in a powerhouse drive that carried within 15 miles of the East Prussian border on the south. Simultaneously a ferocious on-.. slaught wiV opened .on with Soviet troops and tlie Rus- sian-sponsored First Polish army fighting: bitter cngugt- ments with the Germans in the suburban area of Fraga. on the right bank of the Vistula river. The drive :to recover Hungarian- held Transylvania for Romania mode progress, Russian and Roman- ian troops seizing more thin: 50 settlements deep In that mountain- ous area, principally the city and railway station of Odorhci, the 5oviet communique announced in detailing successes in a big dny all alone the eastern Lomza, last major stronghold guarding: the southern ap- proaches to East Prussia, fell to the Russians after 11 days of battle that ranked with the bloodiest of the entire sum- mer. The Russians then swept on north and northwest, taking more than 30 smaller towns, including Nov- gorod, nine miles northwest of Lomza poised along the eastern frontier of East Prussia. Premier Stalin had announced capture of Lomza a few hours after the German hlfjh command ac- knowledged its loss. The German communique, in seeking to explain tills defeat of elite troops who had been or- dered not to yield another fool of ground, said, "northeast of Ostrolck'a, our troops frustrat- ed nn Intended Russian break- through on a broad front, in the course of which the town of Lomza was given up.1' Ostroleka, 23 miles west of Lom- i and an equal distance south of East Prussia, fell last week to en. G. F. Zafrbarov's Second White Russian army group, which captured Lomza. The German radio admitted Zak- harov's assault still showed no signs of slackening and was being prose- cuted on a broad front. Resistance Light in Advance to Aachen SUPREME HEADQUARTERS ALLIED EXPEDITION- ARY FORCE, Thursday, Sept. troops rolling through surprisingly light resistance Wednesday drive into the outskirts of the important German border city of Aachen, one of the northern keystones of the Siegfried line, and struck close to the core of the Nazis' vaunted West- wall on at least three other sectors along a 90-mile front. The Americans captured the border village of Hotgea, 10 miles southeast of Aachen, the first German: community to he reported taken in the all-out assault on Hitler's reich and stood 325 airline miles from Berlin in their march on the Nazi capital. As the American armored columns encountered only minor opposition in the Siegfried line' outposts, indications were that the Germans were falling back toward the Rhine, 40 miles in the east in this sector. The Yanks won positions in the town forest of Aachen and in outskirts overlooking the city, a rail and highway hub of more than population, historically a strong fortress position and in modern times a strategic citadel in the Sieg- fried line. To the south of these onrushing forces, which were part of the First army of Lt. Gen. Courtney H. Hodges, two other columns were storming or preparing to storm major fortifica- tions in the Siegfried system. The first stood within gunshot of Germany, east of the village of Clervaux, in the northern tip of Luxembourg, and the other farther to the south was in Germany north- west of the town of Tier, its I I Bomb Deluge Hits Germany LONDON, Sept. Over- whelming formations o( between and Allied planes rang- ed ahead of Allied ground forces Invading Germany. In the. great- est concentrated air attack'.in his- tory today, rtropplng tons of bambj'-i Wstween- the Slejrfr'lod line and Berlin and destroying at-least 53 more planes of the fading Ger- exact position unreported since an initial penetration of at least five.miles two days ago. As the Allies closed in on Ger- many all along the western front, supremo headquarters an- nounced early today that the American armies First, Third anil captured prisoners since Tile Seventh, driving up Irora tl south of France, closerj In on.the sentinel city of Belfort guarding .lie approach lo. southwestern Car- many through the Burgrundy state, while at the extreme northern end of the Allied line the British Sec- ond army was veering northeast- ward through Belsiuhi and Holland n a smash which che Germans said was aimed nt flunking the Siegfried Ine from the north. Mldn-ay along- the front Third army troops under Lt. Gen. George S. Pallon were on the move again, capturing Ncafcha- teau, 11 miles southwest of Nan- cy on the west bank of the Mo- selle, and fighting their ivuy In- side Charmps, on the cast bank 23 miles south of Nancy. Above Mciz Pntton's men captur- ed a heights dominating the strate- !c town of Thlonville and clear- d the Germans out of that part Sco GERMANY Tg. 11, Col. 5 Man Charged With Killing KnoxCitian ief of said com- tacked b- two man air force. The Allied bombers peppered the attack area with an aver- age of ten tons of bombs a minute, an efficient example of "carpet" bombing Introduced In Africa by Air Chief Mar- shal Sir Arthur Tedder, now Gen. Elsenhower's deputy mander. Tedder has intensified the. assault mcthoJ so It leaves almost nothing untouched in the area under attack. Thirty-three German p 1 anes were knocked out in the air and 20 destroyed on the ground. The assault was continued ab nightfall by medium bombers which attacked the causeway between Wnlcheren and South Bcveland in Holland and strafed the roads and rail crossings on the south bank of the west Scheldt river. One squadron was a Dutch formation of Mitchells. The U. S. Eighth air force lost 27 bombers and nine fighters. A iorce of fortresses and Lib- erators, escorted by 300 fighters, at- throe synthetic oil plants, DALLAS, Sept. Detectives Will Fritz plaints charging murder and rob- two motor transport factories and bcry were filed here today against other military targets. Emet Howeth war worker. Fulton, former The complaints, before Justice of the Peace W. L. Sterrett, accused Pulton of killing and robbing Fred- erick F. Davis, 57, boxing instruc- tor, Sept. 4. Davis, from Knox City, Knox county, was stabbed and robbed on a vacant lot. Fritz said, in the pres- ence of a witness. British heavies blasted the Onas- bruck marshalling yards, and bomb- ed the synthetic oil plant at Nord- stcrn. Humorist Dead LONDON, Sept. Heath Robinson, 72, artist and hu- morist, died today at his home In suburban High Oate. UP FRONT MAULDIN Lofief Makes Good On Stork Promise DALLAS, Sept. Cecil former slate legislator from Rotfm from to called up- on to speak before the state demo- cratic convention today, told this story: "When I flr.st ran for the legisla- ture, my opponent had eight chil- dren and I had one. T promised the voters that if I was elected, I would have another baby. "I did, and I've had one evrry election year .since except this year." A.M. fifi fin i_ P.M. High and low Hrt and SO. tile n'.l mirf no. Kirrtcfif )nit nlflit: 5.1 Ktinrlftr turning; Suniet nd low samr ilati Jack Joking, Mary Livingston Replies HOLLYWOOD, Sept. Livinpston declared today that the statement of Jack Benny, her husband, that she was nn ex- pectant mother came i.f a com- plete si-rpiise to her, "Ho m'..st have been she "I talked with Jack two days nfro but the subject wasn't even mentioned. We had considered adopting another bnhy, but that was some time ago." Copr, loll by United Ine. "Sure thcy's a revolution In Germany. Git down so tliey won't hit yn n wild shot."   

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