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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: August 26, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - August 26, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                 Wí)t iíbílene    MORIMING  *VOL.  LXIV, NO. 70  A TEXAS NEWSFAPga  WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES.”-Bvron  —EIGHT PAGES  ABILENE, TEXAS, SATURDAY MORNING, AUGUST 26, 194^  Associated Pr«u fAPJ  United Pre%s fVJ>u PRICE FIVE CENTS  Romanians Overwhelm Enemy  ■French, Yanks Seize •The Heart of Paris  Cannes Falls As Americans Near Frontier  ROME, Aug. 25 — (AP) ■  SUPREME HEADQUARTERS ALLIED EXPEDITIONARY FORCE, Aug. 23—(AP)—French and American forces ________ ___^    _  seized the heart of Paris today just as it was falling from ' American troops, lunging sud-the failing grasp of Patriots, and the hour of final liberation ^ jenly eastward from their for more than four years of iron rule under the German Riviera beachhead in southern army and the gestapo seemed near at hand.    ! France, have captured the fa-  (The Free Paris radio reported that the German com- I mous resort towns of Cannes gander of Paris had surrendered, his officers were ordered ; Antipes and tonight were cease firing immediately and hoist the white flag).    fighting forward less than 20  The fifth French column to enter the city reached the |    from the Italian frontier. i  Luxembourg, near the center of the city, at 10:20 a.m. and j Nice, within short artillery engaged in a battle with the Germans, and collaborationist    '    -  militia.  • In the fog of early morning American infantry—the first of this second American ex--peditionary force within a generation to enter Paris—  ■battled to Notre Dame, whose ancient bells a few hours before had welcomed the first French patrols to the city.  On all sides the liberating French and Americans were greeted by ^Tungry Parisians, mad with joy. who had fought alone against the German oppressors since they were called to armis last Saturday.  Brig. Gen. Jacques Leclerc. hero of the fighting French in the north ^Mrican campaign, was in the forefront of the battle, leading the tanks to the rescue of Patriots who had been frantically calling for help as the Germans fought back throughout the night.  Those on the outside had heard ' jo Americans who fought the first _  •:he e^xtrlc 5''^,,?'";^,‘ World War, was cutting across the [ „onh. Tonight’s headquarters com-i*:!    “‘d    P^bing into  Nazi Resistance South of Seine Almost Canceled  SUPREME HEA DQU A R T E R S ALLIED EXPEDITIONARY FORCE SATURDAY. Aug. 26—i/p)—American tanks In a 23-mlle advance yesterday rolled into Troyes, 85 miles southeast of Paris and 163 miles irom the German border at -the Rhine, while far behind them Allied armies were stamping out the last sparks of German resistance south of the Seine.  Lt. Gen. George S. Patton's armor. now racing toward soil known  range of the advancing Yank forces, was expected to fall at any hour.  other swift Allied columns drove methodically toward the heart of Prance and a Junction with General Eisenhower’s victorious forces in the  STOCHOLM. Saturday, Aug. 26 —Field Marshal Gen. Guenther Von Klu^e has been kilied, the newspaper Da^sns Nyhcter said today on the basis of information rcceivcd from Germany.  Circumstanecs of his reported death were not known here and the newspaper had no additional detaOs. (There was no confirmation of this report in either Axis or Allied official quarters.)  Von Kluge, 61 years old, had held command of the German armies on the western front since July 6, when he succeeded Field Marshal Gen. Karl Rudolph Von Rundstedt.  arms of the French revolution—) southern France and raising which testified to the plight of the i fresh perils to the Reich's frontier. Patriots.    I At Troyes the doughboys stand  scon fighting raged throughout | 130 miles south of the German bor-^^t.he city, aiong the Place de la j der at the Saar. 163 miles west of  the delta of the great Rhone valley were close to Arles and Tarascón, river towns only a few miles apart (A German high command com-  *l.ne City, hiuhb «.x»«    , uci tn« ouur. 10a innes wesu oi rnnnimip inriiontrrt that o oi.r»<»rnl  Concorde, before the chamber    of it where the Rhine winds north- I    “ general  deputies, toward Les Invalides,    as j ward near Strasbourg, and 138 miles ¡ whr.no  - — • •.....-    /-•'i... I i-ne rvnuiiL  Americans and F*rench drove the Germans from their barricades and buildings converted Into fortresses.  Associated Press Correspond-1^ ent Don Whitehead, who was with the first American troops to enter Paris, said the Germans were holding out on both sides of the Seine along the Champs Elysees. the Place de ^ la Concorde, the Qual d’Orsay,  ^ the Tuilcries. the Gardens of the Louvre, the Madelaine. the chambrr of deputies, the senate and the Hotel Crillon.  When the last enemy rear guard  west of Belfort gap. which the Germans are expected to defend strongly before it leads into the industrial Rhineland.  At Troyes they also are 37 miles south of the Marne, scene of many a bjoody battle In the first war, and 50 miles west of Chaumont. Gen. .lohn J. Pershing's headquarters In that  enemy retreat was in progress up valley toward Lyon, which had been reported in the hands of French Patriot forces.)  Bitter fighting still raged in the naval base of Toulon, where French troops drew their ring of steel tifjhtpr about a stubbornly-resi.st-ing Nazi garrLson. A heavy Allied attack had been launched to wipe out the last four pockets of Germans  There were signs that even more ii"» Marseille. T^vo German generals momentous fighting was impending ' and 5.000 prisoners had been cap-  in the  Bulgaria on Verge )eserting Nazis  LONDON, Aug. 25—(AP)—Romania declared war on Germany today airier Nazi bombers raided Bucharest, the ! capital, and radio reports said German ground troops within Bucharest had been swiftly overwhelmed by King Mlhai’s regiments.  The declaration of war against Germany by her former sattellite was announced in a proclamation by King Mihai’s new government which was broadcast from Bucharest.  It said the Romanians had gained complete control of the capital from the Germans, whose whole Balkan edifice was fast collapsing.  (A Romanian high command communique broadcast recorded by the Federal Communications commission said: “We have taken more than 4,000 prisoners and captured large quantities of war material. The liquidation of a few islands of resistance around Bucharest contijiues.")  The Bucharest radio said  MILITARY AND POLITICAL ASSAULTS ON HITLER’S “FORTRESS”—Open arrows indicate Allied military assaults on Hitler’s “Fortress Europe” (shaded boundaries) wliilc numbers locate satellite nations of Romania (1), which already has announced a decision to accept Allied peace terms, and Bulgaria (2), Hungary (3) and Finland (4) which are reported anxious to get out of the war. Heavy black lines represent approximate fronts. (AP Wirephoto).    _ _  the plains north of Paris, with lured in the Mar.seili the Germans possibly falling back pai>t. 72 hours.  to a Rattle line along the Somme , American uniti; drivniR westward river, another scene of heavy en- from Salon, northwr.si of Marseille, •pportcd within less tiian eight of tile city of Aries on the pulling out of the rocket coast for- S Riione river. Another Yank column ,    , tifications. pilots reported, probab- poundnig alone the Durance valley  and children hnod '    aPP''°«chme Avignon, on the  blocking entrance to the city caved ;    ‘he first World War,  «in under the shock of American; ^t least part of their forces —-and French attacks, the capital went ’  Men. women  ‘ M -th'f hen'h"- co" Parir’-Which the G™s“have siopperhe ^s au"bCt’’smoThl |  -warming, Fighter.s and fighter-bombers in clearing weather struck hammer blows at these forces along and beyond the Seine, destroying or dam-ing 105 tanks and l.=i8 other vehi-  bndgehead 30 m^les northwest Rhciio nortii of Arles,  Still offirially unconfirmc»!  ♦    ored by Frenchmen around his Jeep.  Said one old man, saluting with tears in his eyes:  ‘God bless America. You have savpd France.”  % That seemed to sum up the feeling nf many in the vast throngs.  AP Correspondent Edward D. Ball reported earlier that an Allied column, driving due east toward the capital. had stormed Into Versailles, 10 miles  ♦    from the center of the city.  The Germans were driven from  many strategic parts of the city by the combined onslaught of the French military and the fury of citizens.  ^ Lt. Gen. Joseph Pierrt* Koenig, ^commander-in-chief of the French forces of the interior, announced in n communique that all the main official buildings and most of the liifczhways were now under the pro-tfciion of Leclerc* second armored fttlivision.  cies.  They shot down 41 enemy plane.s trying to protect these movements, probably got six more, damaged 21  See FRANCE, Pg. 8, Col. 1  The Weather  Expect Rio Grande To Overflow Today  McALLEN. Aug. 25 —(^P)— Storm-^ed rains from a hurricane which struck near the lower Rio Grande valley this week, plus flood waters from Mexican tributaries, will force the Rio Grande out of its banks tomorrow, J. L. Lytel of San Benito, international boimdary commission Engineer, said tcday.  DEP.ARTMENT OF COMMERCE  ABILENE irday and Sunda EAST TEXAS:  VEATHER BVHEA  TEMPEn.VTUUES  8un5iet toniffht:  was the report from Switzerland that advanced American units had reached the SwLss border near Geneva. However, fast armored columns habitually work far in advance of the main body of Allied troops and it was entirely possible that mechanized cavalry and combat engineers were at the fron-  (An A.ssociited Prcs.s dispatch from Geneva .said an American patrol which Thursday briefly St. Julien on the border had proceeded westward to Bellegarde, 13 miles from St Julien and some seven miles from the frontier.)  An official announcement said the Yank force which captured the in-du.strial city of Grenoble. 70 miles from the Swi.ss border, was such a living cohunn cjierating in advance of the mnin body of troop.^. It said tlic f ulire Grenoble area sniec had "firmly occupied’ with Mic ns-M.^tnnce of French patrious.  French troops assaulting Toulon (X (upied the l-^nd arsenal within thf' city, but a headquarters spok-r.-in.'tn said the Germans still were rr.'-i.^^ting stiffly around the naval ar^-f'nal in the harbor and on the tw.i peninsulas which partly land-lock the harbor.  Hand-to-hand fighting went on in the streets as the fanatl-ral Nazis refused to surrender. Similar street fighting raged in some jiarts of Marseille, but on a reduced scale.  OPA Retains Mohair Price  By HARRY HOLT  The long-awaited OPA decision on ceiling prices for mohair ha^ been released.  It is so complicated that it will take a Philadelphia lawyer to^ ftc-ure out the order, but in brief it i-'' expected to bring little change in the price of mohair. After all. that is all the producer i.s concerned about.  The OPA will announce in Wa.^h-ington today ihat; sales of mohair in original bap or bale are exempted from price control effective Aug 30.-  The action does not remove price controls on crnded mclmir and mohair matchings of sorts or other commodities processed from mohair, George Stimpson. the R.eporter-New.<; correspondent in WashinRton. wrote  Original bag or bale mohair wa.s removed from price control because of the easing of the j u))plv-demand situation as far a.-s moiiair Ls concerned and the difficulty of establishing dollar and cent prices for this prodticl. the OPA saui.  Vestal Askew, .‘iccrei.nv of the Texas Sheep ^ Goat Ratsers as.«^o-clation, said yesterday in San Angelo that the best he could figure iVpd '    would be  ! little change in mohair prices, as a 1 result of the new order, with hair [selling in line with last springs ; price of 58 to 62 cents per pound for ' adult hair and 80 cenUs for kid hair.  Tliat there may be further changes in the mohair program was indicated by the orA statement cleared and issued through the fiu-ilities of the War Inforni;Uion offi'*-.  ••The difficulty in e.KtabU.shing  See MOIIAIK. Pg. 8. ( ol. 2  Mitchells Sink Five Freighters In East Indies  By The Associated Press  Skip-bombing Mitchells sank five Japanese freighters and dam.Tgrd three other sliips. Including a light; cruiser, in the Dutch East Indies' Tlnjrsd'ay, Gen. Douglas Mac.^r-thur announced last nicht.    ^  The cruiser was left- blazing froni stem to sterm and Ijclirvrd to be sinking.  Forty lugger.s and barges were riddled in the attack near Menado , on Celebes island, west of Halma-hera. Other bombers cleiinnt the pathway to the Philippines for MncArtlivir set off explo.sions and -started fires on Halmahera. 300 miles south of the Philippine.^  MacArthur made no nur.'.ion of ai\ attempt to invade tli islands east of HalmaJiera ed earlier by Tokyo rndif) broadcasts also told of rier raid Sumatra.  In >Vashlngton Rear Adm. .lames II. Irish, Navy Inventory control officer. complained “the Navy’s war In tb<* Pacific Is being handicapped by the failure to obtain necessary ships.” He said the navy assumed the war woultl last “at least until the end of 1945.”  U. S. warplanes raided the out. fringes of 1,800.000 squar  Today's Vote  Pear of light vote in the second Democratic primary today brought pleas that Taylor countians make luse of tiieir approximate 13.500 , and Feddor I. Tolbukhii poll tax or exemptions receipt.s. i linked ui) for n smash t< Ij3 the July primary 'jnJy about 8,000 persons cast their vote.s. In 1942. 7.906 out rf a possible 9.108 the second pri-  Ihe Germans tried, to capture the Baneasa airport near Bucharest, but were thrown back by the royal Romanian guards regiments and that roads from there to the capital were littered with German guns and vehicles.  The war proclamation «aid Romania gave the Germans an opportunity to withdraw without interference but. "after assurances as .solemn as they were periidlotis,” German units attacked Romanian units and ‘‘even machlnegunned the -hour clip rcachcd the Oa-1    population ot vUlages and  ' the capital.”  Juliu Manlu. leader of the peasant party who joined the new gov-ernment a few days ago. said In a broadca.st statement that Romania had sacrificed more than 600,000 men to German Interests.  Chaos in the Balkans, with Irreparable harm to the German war machine, was evident in .tiiese oth*-cr reported divelopmehts: '    -  Berlin acknowledged a blir retreat was underway by Na*l divisions trying to escape the Soviet steamroller sliding down to the Galati gap. key to Balkan plains, and the Nazis seemed likely to give up all Roman-  Russians Surge Into Romania At Mile-an-Hour  LONDON. Aug. 26 — — Two Russian armies surging toward the heart of Romania at better than  latl gap defenses between the Daube river and the Carpathian mountains yesterday In a six-day whirlwind offensive which Moscow announced had cost the enemy 100,000 killed and Í05.000 captured.  T^^•elve German divisions of upwards of 60,000 men also have Deen surrounded ana 13.000 of tlt)em. capturnd In the last two days southwest of fallen Chrlslnau. provincial capital of Bessarabia, a Moscow communique said, and tiie second and third t’kraine armies under Generals Rodion Y. Malinoc.skv  Majiia report-if). Enemy third car-  votes were c  L/iJtc ab.«ientee ballot.s rcfurned to the office of the comity ( lerk. Vivian Fryar. have m;iftr the total 225. Re-turnrd in Jiil;.' U'cre 3G4 absentee ballot,v  J. P. Sim>(>n. Democratic chairman for TayiMj- county, urging voters to go to I he polls tfKlay. said Friday that    cit r/.en.ship tie-  rnaiid.N the riualifird voter to take intf re.^t In the election of men to miportant offices,  •'Hrre Ls an opportunity,' he said, "to ca.^t votes in ihe^dminlstra-iioii of the stale's affairs by the election of the attorney general. We are jjiven a part in the supreme  spearheads  Thousands of Romanians wrre abandnnhig thr struggle against tlie Russians an<I turning to fi(;ht the (iernnins sit the oriiers of tiicir govrrnmrnt. dispatches said. Berlin .idmittrd its trot>ps urrr retreating.  A total ->f '):.n towns and villages  swept ' cnpt  Ru.s;  ire ol Tecufi. 112 tnilry ■ Hui'harest and 82 rnilc-; •itih-wifckcd PlorsrI .>11 ho Russians under Ma-  niorcement ot  nd  ROAD TO BERLIN  BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS l~Russian front: 322 miles (from the eastern suburbs of Warsaw).  2—Northern Prance; 495 miles (from Troyes).  miles of  ral Pacific  .lapn  nf)W dominjifecl by thn American nav\, T{^r^ets includrd Wake island. Iwo jima. 750 miles .south oi Tuk\i>. PHuan and Ai-it.ian Iji thr Marianas: Ponape in tlie Carolines; Nauru, and by^passed Marshall Is-land.-i  A .Japanese broadcast sair! Allie^l amphibious forces landeri Th morning r>n the Mapia islands. le.ss than 700 n east of the Philippines driven back into the se The little i.sland group l miles north of Manokwa  are .sele<-ti the life ot ( i a covinty ri-slfierini,’ ,• Ifare ol tl  ontrolled local governii Candidati lot for con.su For altorne  : a man who touch-•r.s individual. Klect-Miuni.ssion, we are .son.s clo.se.sf. to the people in tax and  lei  .Je.-  E Ma  nrdrr «>f  Ma  sliai  hv I rpb Stai  official bal-  a.ssfK'iate  to (tl.  OÍ  Davidi  by noon about 150 in Dutch  Florence  4—Southern Prance ifrom Grenoble».  .Simp.son and Rj< hard Crit/;  Rii.v.rU and clvrir 'liuTntt: rii.sti anf)rney, 42nd di.Miut, Carl P Hulsey and ThoniM,‘ Ì-. ilavden; tax a.s-se.ssfn- and cciHrct or Luther Mc-Millon and Pat parterson; county c«-nuni.ssior,s. pi-erutft No. 3. Leo Standard and Flovd Tate, and for precinct No. 2. Hou.ston Robertson and Lem Dudlev.  nouneed tiiat ilrn. Ivan Mas-lrnnikn%s Ihiril Baltic army had eaplurrti Tartu, university eity of the Riga-Tallinn railway liJO Hides southfrtst of Tallinn. Kstonian capital. Stalin ternM'ii H an “ I slronirpoini in C;e <-ovrring tlie road.s tral arras of Kstot derf'd a :>0-salvn \ fron» r:\    uu  SOTifh of nm/a < rti Pf.hnul    -.Vi!  front, Bu Romaniai assist int.  rd Ru-! la So . i(t    Uulgaria was on the verge of  trying to Jump on the Allied , bandwagon:  I Oermany quickly “reshuffled” the , puppet Hungarian government im-der Premier Doeme Sztojay to meet the new dangers from the southeast—a reference to Romania’s desertion and Hungary's peril from the threat not only of Russian troiips bui Romanian soldiers eager to re>..Hin Transylvania.  Open fighting between Hungarians and Romanians in Transylvania. ceded by Romania to Hungary under Nazi dictation in 1&40, wa« reported.  Romanu’s declaration of war on Cicrmany was reported by the Cairo radio, which quoted a statement picked up from the Bucharest radio.  “The Romanian government asks Romanians to take an active part In the liberation of their country and expresses its confidence in the nation at this critical moment, and Its confidence that the Romanian army will fight courageously against the Germans and that the civilian population will offer its resistance." the broadcast said.  News that German planes had attacked the capital came over the same channel.  Romanian troops were surrendering In droves to the Russians and r t a n t  defenses See BALKANS. Pg. 8, Col. 3  nirr-  BORDEAUX FREED  IRI N. Spain. Aug. 25—i/P>— Information reaching this border town today from the FFI said Bordeaux, France’s fourth largest city, had been liberated« (Capture of Bordeaux by French and American forces also was reported Thursday by-the French radio at Algiers, but no confirmation has yet come from official sources.)  608 mllc.s  EUGENE MANTOOTH KILLED IN ACTION; BROTHER'S ’LIFE SAVED BY DOO, NOW IN HOSPITAL WITH HIM  Close on the heels of Army notifies tlon that S-Sgt. Eugene P. Man-tooth of Abilene had been killed in action, came news Friday of the narrow escape from death in France of his brother. Pvt. Roy L. Man-tooth-  Sergeant Mantooth had been listed as missing in action, and was killed July 27 in Prance, his parents, Mr. and Mrs, Y. Mantooth, 1397 Locust, were notified. He had been in service seven of the last pjght years.  "Private ¿dnutooth, one of three  surviving brothers in seWice, broke Into the news in this story, cabled by the British Information services:  “Thanks to General Montgomery, who understood the bond between a boy and his dog. Sergeant Flea-bite today sits beside Pvt. Roy L. Mantooth of Abilene, Tex., in a hospital in England.  “The Sergeant, a ^ Pomeranian spitz, twice saved his'master's life In the battle for St. Lo and was later on the. stretcher when the 28-year-old private was moved from  the front with shrapnel wounds. ; hind a mound of dirt, with Fleabite Montgomery visited the hospital in i lying between us. Suddenly I felt France, saw the boy and his dog ; Fleabite race like hell across my and personally ordered that they I shoulders. That's what he used to be allowed to remain together right j do when he heard an 88 shell com-back lo England.    ing lefore we did. So I went right  “I wouldn't take a million dollars | after him. Smith taking off in the for Fleabite” said Mantooth. "I had ' opposite direction. After I hit the him in South Carolina at the camp, i foxhole I looked back. That We trained together and he learn- | screaming minnie had hit right ed to head for a foxhole during j where we were lying ...  shelling. That's how he saved our j “Another time Sergeant .scented! miles recaptured. His live?.'    ¡a bunch of jerries creeping up on ' versed the ‘’hell of n heatuic” he  • I and Pvt. Glen Smith from I us. His warning enabled up to get | said the Nipponese gave the Allies Ohio were watching the enemy be-1 m first with hand grenades. ” lin that area two years ago.  Halmahera. southern  to fhe Phillppiner.  The raid on Sumatra, Tf»kyo sai was made the same morning \ 28 carrier planes.  The attack came shortly after the return of .\dm. Lord Louis Mountbatten to his command of the southeast Asia theater and Adm. Sir Bruce Austin 1'raser‘s assumption of command of the British far eastern fleet. relieving Adm. Sir James Somerville.  Mounlbatten. who has been conferring in London wiib Allied leaders on plans to step up the southeast Asia war. said fighting in his theater had been delayed by withdrawal of equipment for use In Europe.  Despite handicaps of material.  MOST POWERFUL FLAME-THROWER USED TO SAVE INFANTRY LIVES IN FRANCE  terrain and weather. Gen. Jo.seph W. StUwell reported that in hl.s 1944 north Burma campaign 20.000 Japanese were killed and 10,000 squ«»-c ictorles re-  WASHINGTON, Aug 25—the new wrapr-n The British toniqht took secrecy powerful flame wraps off the fire-breathing 41- world, ton Chuchlll Crocodile." tank- Designed mounted flame thrower capable of: points of the Atin hurling Its lethal blaze 450 feet i infantry li ahead and even around corners.  The potent British Weapon was introduced to tl^e Germans at Normandy beaches. Since then it has been used with what the British Information services reported as “deadly effect” in burning a path for British and Canadian forces through Hitlers strongpoints In France.  The British supply council and anny staii in the announcement of  most' an orthodox Churchill, with no cub the , in wirepower.  I The announcement said the Brlt-burn out strang-jish first used flame-throwers, to ; all and savei put a coastal battery out of action .  in the Dieppe raid and have been’,; working on their development ever:: since.    ., ■  One eminent British sciehtistiDr.," Frank Sturdy Slnnatt, hastened; his -death by his untiring effoiis-ih development of flame wcapozis,<thjS/J British information services ported.  Crocodile" uses a special new type of fuel. Its flames can be ricocheted off a nearby surface, in the maner of a billiard shot, to burn out pillboxes and trenches hundreds of feet away.  The flame gun, is mounted on a standard Churchill tank, with the fuel carried in an armored trailer behind. The flame equipment can be jeLiisoned in case of need and  The Germans got the benefit'otM it all on D-Day at H-plusr35:lioiirstg  J....™........................,"hen the Crocodiles, newly-built.  the tank can operate thereafter as] rolled ashore on schedule. >   

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