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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 29, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 29, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                WAR BOND BOX SCORE Overall Quota Series E Quota Series K Sales Wed... 34.0C8.75 Series E Sales io Date Ibilene Reporter "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT MORNING VOL. LXIV, NO. 13 A TEXAS SmLL, NIWSPAPSH ABILENE, TEXAS, THURSDAY MORNING, JUNE 29, 1944 -FOURTEEN PAGES Associated Freu unUcd 1'IUCE FIVE CENTS Greatest Armored Fight Of War Staged At Caen Dewey Accepts; 1-Man Government' r increase CHICAGO STADIUM, June Thomas E. Dewey accepted the Republican presidential nomination to- night with a pledge to "end one-man government in Amer- crush Germany and Japan's will to make war, and de- vote himself io "rewinning freedom" at home. The Roosevelt administration, he cheering delegates in this jam-packed bowl, is grown "old and tired and quarrel- some in and is unequal to the great, pressing prob- lems of war and peace. Declaring that the military conduct of the war "must re- main completely out of poli- Dewey said he wanted to make it "crystal clear" that ,jany change in administration would not involve changes in the high command. "In the vital matters of taxation, price control, rationing, labor rela- tions, manpower, we have become familial: with the spectacle of wrangling, bungling and he faid. Dewey declared, however, that the In EBond Sales Expected Today Sale of Series E bonds iu AbSlene's BURMA CAMPAIGN IS NO overshadowed by the Normandy invasion, fighting in the Burma thcafer goes on and is still as tough as any in (he as these photos suggest. At upper left an Allied soldier lies dead on the Myitkyina airdrome, tak- en by Merrill's Marauders after bloody fighting. He was killed by one of Jap Zero planes constantly strafed the field after Chinese and American fighters seized it. At up- per right, Cpl. James H. Armstrong of Corsicana, Texas, looks over Japs killed when a hand grenade blasted their rock barricade; Below, American soldiers, including a corres- pondent and his typewriter, take rcfitge from Jap snipcr's'.bullefs under wing of a C-47 on Myitkyina 'airdrome. Fall; Army Hears Minsk military conduct of the war "is out- side this campaign." "It is and must remain complete- ly out of he said. "General Marshal! and Admiral King arc do- ing a superb job. Thank God for both of them. "Let us make It crysal clear that for other Sec Pajc Nine stories on ToUtics. CAMP STATION HOSPITAL RECEIVES RE-DESIGNATION 0. BY RUSSELL LASDSTROM LONDON, Thursday, June the swift westward r.dvancn which in le-ss than a week has re-occnpicd a p p roximateb square miles of Russian soil ahd liberated some places, So- viet troops captured the Nazi strongholds of Mosilcz. Lepel and Osipovichl in WhitD Russia yester- day and closed to n ithin 50 miles tf the historic city of Minsk, Mos-1 Camp Barkelcy's Station hospital! is one of five Army Service Forces and five Army Air Forces instal- lations in the Eighth Service com- mand to be re-designated a region- al hospital. Official notification of the change was received by Col. Roy Fox, hos- pital commander. Monday. Colonel ed by the Barkeley hospital has not been officially outlined, offi- cers have been told it will embrace Camp Bowie. Big Spring bombard- ier school, San Angel o Army air field. Avenger field at Swcetwater Abilene Army air base, which roady was being served by the [Station hospital, and possibly Camp a change of administration next January cannot and will not Involve any change in the military conduct of the war. If there" is nol now anj civilian Interference with the mili- tary commands, a change In admin- istration will not alter that status If there is civilian interference, the new administration will put a slop to it forthwith." Asserting that "this flection will tu'lni ;u> end to one-man government in flewry told the convention that it would be his purpose, if elected, to appoint a "cabinet of the ablest men and women to be found in America." "Its members will expect nnd will receive full delegation of the power; of their lie said. "They will he capable ol administering those Young Men In Cabinet Is Pledged By DOUGLAS B. CORNELL CHICAGO STADIUM, June Thomas E Dewey, formally accepting the Republican parly nomination for the presidency, declarcc tonight that the making o world peace "is no task to be entrusted to stubborn men grown old and tired and quar relsome in office." The stocky New Yorker look ove: the party reins in the closing cere mony' "m't'.onal convention which had vottd them to" him eight hours befofer 1056 to -I. Th convention adjourned at ai'te hearing the acceptance. Like everyone else In the hug' hall, the nominee's face was glisten ing In the heal Jeslde him. whe ic first appeare before the 'thrcn of Repubh cans and spectators, was Mrs. Dewey. "N o organlza- AT LEAST THREE GERMAN DIVISIONS IN TURMOIL ByJAMKS M. LONG SUPREME HEADQUARTERS ALLIED EXPEDITION- ARY FORCE, Thursday, June tanks and peace powers. They each be exper- Fox was in Dallas Tuesday con- Welters at Mineral Wells. cow said today. ferring with service command of- ficers and was expected to have full details of the function of tile new unit today. Other hospitals included in the order were those at Camp Robin- son. Ark.. Camp Polk, La., Camps Switt and Maxey and Forl Bliss, Forces units, SanAn- Tcx., Army Service and Pyotc Army Air I tonio Aviatinn Cadet Center, Ama- Physlcal rcclassific.ilion of offi- cers p.nii enlisted men by medical boards Is expected to be a big part of the added work. The new designation should mean an enlarged. officers' staff, with the addition of a number of specialists. Captain said, and The new successes virtually rles- j rillo and Shepparri fields, Iroyed the -Fatherland line" which I and Barksrialc field. La., iir bitten: ale- the Germans had heavily fortified Tex Army i Air Force nospi a Is. A regional hospital is between a a depth of many miles and statjOn a hospital, brought the complete encirclement I created to augmenl work of gen- of Bobruhk last Nazi stronghold hospitals and relieve them of this system of fortifications. Burden, particularly "n" lm orthopedic surgery cases, Capt. By taking the railway Junction j R w adjutant, ex- Osipovichl on the Minsk-Bob- plained, niisk line the Reds established a strong salient within 60 miles of It. is a central hospital point for a designated area for advanced anujift I types of surgery and cases requir- Minsk from the southeast and to' ienced in the task to be done and young enough to do it. There will be the necessity alter the war is won. he said, of re-winn- ing "freedom" at home. Dewey said the war must be fought to a total victory so that Germany can "never again ncurlsh the delusion that she could have won." "We must carry to Japan a defeat so crushing nnd he de- clared, "that every last man among them knows that he has been beat- en. We must not merely defeat the armies and navies of our enemies. added "We hope it will mean an We must defeat, or.ce and for al increase In enlisted personnel and civilian workers (or the hospital." the northeast were even closer the White Rusrlan capital. Tlic Russian communiriue. an- nounced the capture of Kostril- sa, eisht miles northeast ot ,Borisov. placing this important enemy base in imminent danger of capture. Berlin radio said Soviet lank col- umns and troop concentrations were near and were being at- tacked by the German air force. Moscow ?atd Nazi troops were aajendcring in large numbers and being routed at a tre- mendous cost !n German lives and equipment. Altogether more than 1.000 popu- lated' places within the flaming 550-mile ycr.e of fishtlng were tak- 41 during the day as the Soviet Rjrcc-s swept through what were reputed to be the Nazis' strongest defenses on the eastern front. Mogilev fell to Col. Gen. Matvcl Zakharov's second White Russian army after 24 hours of bitter street Premier Stalin announced. In the coime of blasilng Ihe Na- zis out of their last fortress on lite Dnepr river, (he Russian troops cnp- lurcd two German general', Lt. Gen. Bammlr and Gen. Er- irar.nsborf. and completely routed He I2lh German infantry dhlslon, r-jld the dally broadcast communi- que. Ahhouoh the tcrrilorj' to be serv- their will to make war." Expanding his views on foreign policy. Dewey said that all arc agreed in America that the United States "shall participate with other sovereign nations in a cooperative effort to prevent future wars." There ate few men. he raid, who "really believe that America should try to remain aloot'lrom the world." as well ns few who "belirve it would be practical for America or her Al- HEAD-' l-es to renounce all sovereignty and join a superstate." "General Marshall and Admiral Kir.; are doing a superb Job. Thank lion for will last." told steaming ap- plauding thous- ands crammed In- to this vast in- door bowl, "if It Is slipped through by stealth or trickery or the momen- tary hypnotism of high-sounding phrases. -We shall have to work and pray and be patient, and make sacrilices to achieve a really lasting peace. That Is not ioO much to ask in the name of those who have died the future of our country. Tills is no task to be entrusted to stubborn men. grown old and tired and guar- In office. We learned that introduced by Rep. Martin Jr. o: Massa- the convention chairman as "the president of the Unit- ed States." _ Selected today with er cities in the Fifth Dewey drive and Texas has In 1919." Dewey was War Loa passed til naif-way nmrk, chairman Nalha Adams of the War Finance commit tee of Texas said tonight. The 'U, S. Treasury department confirmed that Dallfis had purchas- ed S76.5I5.857.M 111 bonds as against a quota of S74.890.MO, Adams' aides Ellis Doulhit, .ocal Attorney, )ies Suddenly CHERI10UKG, June Germans caplnrert by Ameri- can forces m France from D- Day, June G, to hsl. night lo- tnlcil was disclosed of- ficially Itnlay, anil others sllll aie-, being brouglil In. The liiggcsl day's haul was .June 2G, when were cap- lureil. Yesterday's figure was wo banks yesterday totaled infantry backed by Canadian gunners caught the prize in 'land port of Caen'm a steel nutcracker last night, reaching to within four miles southwest of the city and throwing at least three German divisions into turmoil in probably the greatest armored ba'.tle ever fought in western Europe. North and northeast of Caen the British, pressed down distances of two to three miles from Caen in fierce, fluid combat between Epron and Hcfouville and along the Orno river canal, but it was the southwestern outflanking mova that brought the greatest conflict and threw the Nazis into it- deadliest peril. Roger D. Greene, Associated ress correspondent with the iritish forces, said in a (rout- ine dispatch that nine sepa- ntc German counter-attacks ad been beaten off without ny gain for the enemy, while he British tanks and Tom- nies pressed ahead, crossing he Odon river line at sev- :ral places. He said In three days of the Brlt- jh offensive more than 60 German 68.75, bringing the counlv'.s nesre- ate for the Fifth War Loan drive o stiii far iliy of tlie oal of A luncheon at the Abilene Army ir base v.th veterans rom the Italian campaign and sev- ral motion picture players on hand s expected to spur the pale, of E ronds today. Both banks and CO men ol the city are selling uncheon tickets which go v.'ilh pur- chase of n Sl.OOO E bond. Appearing at the base officers' :lub will be Cpl. Jimmle Smith of Forl Worth and Cpl. James Fouclic of Dallas, veterans of the Italian -ampaign now stationed at McClos- :ey General and movie ilaycrs Peggy O'Neal, Cindy Garner, -lurU Hall tuid Guinn Williams. The Hollywood party will be met tt the Hilton by a welcoming party from the Abilene Army Air base and with the aid of Slate highway latrol will escort the party 'to the oase for n tour of the mess halts and day rooms, Bond sales totaled M. a rally hela in Lawn Tuesday night in the high school auditcrium, an- nounced Chairman M. G. Reed. In charge of sales WES Major David Evans, special service off! cer, ASFTC. Over 300 persons at- tended (he rally and the barbecue held In connection with the gather- in! Ovalo will go all-out in tiie Fifth War Loan with a bond-selling rail; in the high school auditorium at 9 p. m. Friday, B. W., ii charge of nrnngcmehts, -has   Har.sa hay fell Ju capture was kept day. The annour.eerr.cnt was the fir.-t The Weather trict and appellate- judges during the Slale J33.- o.' Tex.-fs convention at Hctel Texas. "For an of Ilie executive to a-l as pro- secutor and is ropiicnant to our form of government." rd, and thi- 01 uiir courls i.< p'.ain when snch fituatlosis are proprrly tr, tl.rm." jFinnish Cobinef Members Ousted ward Wewak. ,_ June is iv.it iisiuerman Trawlers secret until Near Channel ASSASSINATKD Philippe Ucnriol Vitliy min- ister of information and pro- paganda, was assassinated last night in Taris, Ihe Axis radios announced, {AP pertaining to the Aussies in several j SUPREME HEADQUARTERS weeks. The Australians have pushed ALLIED EXPEDITIONARY Force, on to the Sepik river. June Canadian de-: ttroyer Huron and the British De- slriiyer F-skimo snnk two of thrre aimed Gennan trawlers ne.ir Ihe chaniicl Inlands e.nly today and 28- 'f, W.ir: damaged a third. headqu.ir- Jw.rs' IT.I announced tor.isrit as Allied Kiri'l) Tl XA frlds STOCKHOLM. Th'ir.'d-iy. Jniir 23 i f'in'.ar.d's dominant Socnl Ufinneralic piriy h-" nrrierert i'< rabiiK- ir.mis'f incl'iduip Fi- Minister Vainn rannrr. with- draan from Ihe Rls'.o-l.inkmnifs j which plunged Finland Unto full collateral Icn with Ger- many and opened the doors of southern Finland to Nazi Production Highest DALLAS. Jimr Foods Acininistrator Marvin tonight "more fwvl h.-s -Vrn I nav.il forces continued to produced In the last three apart ar.y threat of German than any nation ever produced in borne interference vith invasion any three years In history." operations. I rid t-m -I. liirh Ifll snrf Return to Work ITIIKV ROMRF.D mpmbcrs of the crew of a HOUSTON. Tev .linif. (left to Maj; Joseph Krilcy ot Odessa. pilot: Capt. Francis .Marion of Normal, III., in a wnrk at ilir I hnniiardicr. and Vermin Shaffer of Chicago, co-nilot. talk H'ifhjs Tool company plants vot-' ovcr jn cnc nf Hie hig hovuhcrs in v.'hicli they look olf ed laic today io return to work in f c, homh inrlustiia! targtfs in Japan IS. (AP Wirepho.o by radio from   

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