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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 27, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 27, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                Reds Sweep On at Mile-An-Hour Clip Marines Plant U. S. Rag in Saipan (SEE STORY, COL 1) STORY, COL WAR BOND BOX SCORE Overall Quota Overall Sales'........ t Series Series E Sales gftflene Reporter "WITHOUT OR OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT VOL. LXIV, NO. 11 A TEXAS NEWSFATKU ABILENE, TEXAS, TUESDAY MORNING, JUNE 27, 1944 PAGES Fteu (AP) United Proa (V.P.I PRICE FIVE CENTS Doughboys Take Cherbourg "Anchors of Russia .Line Taken By RUSSELL LANDSTROM Associated Press War F.ditor LONDON, Tuesday, June 27 With the AEF- EIGHT MONTHS BY FOOT-FIVE HOURS BY CAR By KENNETH L. DIXON WITH THE AEF IN ITALY, June took us eight months lo make the trip from Naples to Rome but today we came back by command car in five hours. And we met a military city on the Army shifting its supplies and service groups from Naples northward. The whole 150 miles or so of the Appian Way were a steady stream of trucks and jeeps, command cars and weapon carriers. It seemed strange coming back to be able to ride tne wa? without worrying about the windshield Massive Ked armies guttering in the sun. flashing to the nearby hills from yesterday captured Vitebsk and Zhlobin, northern and southern anchors of the vaunl- ed German Fatherland line in White Russia, and plunging t forward at a mile-an-hour clip were well on the way toward encirclement of three remain- ing bastions of the German defenses along a 250-mile front, a Soviet communique announced last night. An unprecedented number of populated than liberated In the path of the gigantic offensive as four Red armies left Vitebsk and Zhlobin to be mopped up and plunged west' ward toward Germany itself. The Soviets captured. 40 miles northwest of Vitebsk and only 20 miles from Polotsk. Ger- man base 15 .miles from the old Polish border. The line of this new front alone extended 53 miles southward to captured Chereya, 58 miles southwest of Vitebsk. Soviet forces also plunged more than 40 miles beyond capturec Zhlobin, whose fall yfas hailed In an order. of the day from-Marshal On-the Finnish Red army captured 41 locali- ties cast of Lake Onega, In- cluding the district center of _ Oloncls, 10 milM bcyiind the lake, and 115 miles northeaft of Leningrad. Another section of the Leningrad rail nay was freed above Take Onezhskoe. In the Gulf Finland the bulletin said the Finns had been cleared from the fortified islands or Kolvis- (0 and Tulrlnsaari, south of captured Viipurl and 125 miles across the suit Helsinki. The Russians also announce) last night that the entire lengtl of the Bnltlcawhlte Sea canal 1101 was In Russian hands, and tha for the first time since early 1 the Riisso-German war, Soviet o other Allied warships up to UgB cruisers and merchant vessel f would be able to sail from th northern shores to Leningrad. Th Finns had severed this canal be tween Lakes Ladoga and Onega north ot the latter. _ Moscow had not yet confirmc German reports that still anolhe Red army was attacking In the Os trov sector, 165 miles northwest fallen Vitebsk. Vitebsk was taken by storm hlch German artillery observers used to spot every ash. The first and the last periods of the Naple-to-Rome rive saw the Fifth Army progressing at a compara- vely rapid when you consider the boggcd- owri misery during the middle of the winter. And the battle ground showed It. Just outside ot Rome the destruction Is comparatively slight. Through the erstwhile Anzlo beachhead sector the fighting was on an inch by Inch basis and such leveled towns as the crushed remains of Cisterna show It. For a few miles south of the beachhead again the signs of damage are fewer through the marshy area. Whole villages are left standing, some almost intact. The race was ssvlft through there when the main Fifth Army joined the beachhead forces. But then comes the Adolf Hitler and the Gustav lines and the hills where the winter struggle wiped out scores ot towns and even shrcaded the trees and bushes to jagged slumps. Through Terraclna, Fondi, Itri. Formla, past Gaeta June wind still raises the dust from the crumpled nibble of once beautiful cities and towns and although you though you left it far behind up there on the distant front the smell of death still lingers here laylor Over Ihe lop In Fifth War Loan Taylor county went hurdling over its Fifth War Bond [uota Monday, but drive leaders expressed keen concern over ailure to approach the E Series goal through individual )urchases of bonds or less. Total sales for Monday were at the Abilene lanhs and post office, but E bond purchases totaled only The sales ran the Fifth War Loan figure to a figure well over the over-all goal. Series 5 sales total only as against a goal of 'In an effort'to increase in- erest in -the Series E drive, Vbileue business men and ivic leaders were asked yes erday to sell E bonds 7ith each purchaser given a icket to the -Thursday noon uncheon al the Abilene Air ;ase when motion picture tars and Air Force heroes vill be guests. Admission Allies Capture Valuable Base Surpasses Goal HOTAN, June --Rotan carried Fisher county over the top in the Fiflh War Loan drive to- night by raising at a rally held in the local ball park with approximately persons pres- ent. Quota was In charge of the sales which be- gan at D p.m. and lasted one hour and a half was Maj. David J. Evans, special service officer from Camp Berkeley. Upon completion of the sales and announcement by Major Evans that the ouota had been raised, the ASPTC band which accompanlee him to Rotan paraded In front of the band stand. Guy Patterson of Rotan, perman- ent chairman of war loan drives Lance Davis, chairman of the in Rolan, and W. W. Morion oi Roby, chairman of the drive in Fisher county, also spoke. Jones Creeomq Up on Ihe fourth rlay of the great j On Goal offensive by troops of Grn. Ivan i ANSON. June 26.-M noon Mon day approximately of th Fifth war loan quota had been pur Bagrarniin's first Baltic army, northern and southern united to trap the de- fending Xari forces. Shortly after the announcement ot the fall of the great Nazi bas- tion. Marshal Stalin Issued anoth- er order ot the day. his seventh since the start of the offensive, announcing that ot the chased by Jones county, accordin lo J. J. Stock, county chairma and president of Ihe First Nallona bank Up to that time approximate! 75 percent of bonds purchased wcr of Ihe E series, he said. "I thin when the campaign Is closed th Slalingrad, had taken Zhlobin, 150 miles south of Vitebsk, exposing Bobriusk, 35 miles to the north- west. Thc value of these two bastions scarcely can be overrated. Through Vitebsk run roads to the. Baltic and East Prussia. through Zhlobin arc those leading to Minsk, capital of White Russia. Ihe Weather s. or COMMFRCF. WF.ATIIT.R Anll.r.XF AND VICINITY: FMrllT trrth Klndv WFSr Pirllr cloadr Tnn- U> ind xflrr- hr jnd Ftitnt Tori- porllon Wearied Jap Air Force Pulls Back By MURLIN SPKNCER ADVANCED ALLIED Allies Win First Great French Port By JAMES M. LONG SUPREME HEADQUARTERS ALLIED EX _____ PEDITIONARY FORCE, a.m. HEADQUARTERS, New Gui- AEW) Tuesday, June of 17 __ ROME, June and French troops have slugged their way within less than 15 mile of the Inland city of Siena and within 45 miles of Florence afte Yank forces rolling up the coast captured Hie port of Plom blno without a fight, Allied head quarters announced''.today. German resistance conllnuec spotty In thc coastal sector, de spite fresh reinforcements of 60 ton Tiger tanks brought from France .within the past three .but the Eighth 'Army was meeting stubborn opposition on both sides of Lake Trasfmeno near he center of the long fighting front. Capture of Piombino gave thc Allies another valuable forward supply base on the west coast. The Nazis were forced to abandon thc poit lo avoid encirclement. Amer- ican infantry and armor charged on northward along the Rome-Pisa highway lo within 35 road miles of Livorno Italy's third lareesl port, whose harbor instal- lations have virtually been destroy- ed by Allied bombing and German demolitions. The biueriy-contested tou-n of Chiusi, nine miles southwest of Lake Trasimeno. remained In Ger- man hands, but the enemy's grip was threatened by Eighth Army units which had driven up the western shore of the lake to with- nea, Tuesday, 'June badly-mauled Japanese air forcq facing the Allies in Ihe New Guinea-Solomons .healer may have withdrawn lo safer bases within the Netherlands East Indies and the Philippines, headquarters disclosed today. Allied warp'.ancs swept over ene- my bases in New Guinea. New Britain. New Ireland and the Solo- mons almost without opposition. A small force of Liberators-even at- tacked Truk. In the. Carolines, Sat- urday night, without interception The sharp contrast to the form- er Japanese practice ot reinforc- ing air bases Immediately after Al- lied planes made their attacks prompted observers to suggest (hat the enemy may have withdrawn most of their attacks prompted ob- servers lo suggest that the enemy may have withdrawn molt of their planes to more remote bases with a few to strengthening East Indies and Philippines defenses, particu- larly in view of the Increasing threat of Allied occupation of the Marianas. -Major air.-attack reported In to- day's aside from thc Truk bombing, was sweep by a strong; force of-Liberators'at Noem- foor Island off Dutch New Guinea In daylight. There were concentrat- ed attacks upon (he Japanese in the Attane-Wcwatt sector. Light Naval units destroyed sev- eral enemy barges off New Guinea Saturday One patrol boat Yanks Press Conquest of Vital Base Cherbourg by American doughboys was off! cially announced early today a victory that gave the Allies their first great port to funnel troops and supplies into France. With bayonet and grenade U. S. troops tackled the last few pillboxes and Germans fighting in the city's arsenal area last night. Fall of the port, third largest in France came just three weeks after the Allies landed in Normandy in the early hours of June 6. Associated Press Correspondent Don Whitehead, in a dis- patch from Cherbourg at 9-.12 p.m. p.m.. Central War Time) said that as the mop-up squads moved through -the smoke-filled streets shells whistled into the city from Ger- man positions farther west on Cap De La Hague. (NBC Reporter W. W. Chaplin broadcast from Ihe beachhead thai "all organized resistance has ceascil in and CBS Correspondent Larry Le Suciir broadcast the same report, although he said Germans in forts and (he arsenal were milling up "death In this imminent hour of the greatest victory ot the Invasion, Gen Sir Bernard U Monlgomcry burst open the Caen front with the biggest British in since D-DMT. Dispatches frorg, tUf 'jyrtl rsia.'pbrirtffi resistance In Ch'rhonrg vlr- pt foKscaltercd strong pblnis still defying fe.o was lost, but the crew was saved, northeastern tip of (lie peninsula. tually spent except f boys streaming Into U. S. troops advanced sirtel by street and bouse by house, Icavlnf hunrlwis of f.inailcally-reslslinr Germans dead In Ihe rubble ot their posts, and look firm posscsslqn of the docks, which can bandit the flooil of men and weapons waltlne to pour In from llrllalu nriii direct from the United Slates. Communique No. 42 saltl there still was some resistance to the wcsl of Cap De Ln Hague, where In last stand positions the Germans threw shells into the heart of the city, but there was liltic opposition along the is to fight such a stubborn delay- action in the next few months T..., Sarmi WW.Ilhn.agh the heaviest opposition i, I "Gothic" line between Pisa nwi Alison's quofa is of whlc amount has already bee Stamford and Hamlln hav been allotted No late re 'had arrived today In regar to (heir sales. Two rural communities went ove the top Saturday. They are Lai four miles north of Anson; and Wil- low Creek, in the southeast part of thc county. Every community has been thor- oughly organized. Stecle said. "At present our farmers have been so busy with their crops that they have not begun the real purchase of bonds, but we are confident that See BOND DRIVF. Col! 3. Vf. 2 vill be only through a slip ;ivcn at the time of purchase if the bonds. Plans vere worked out at a meet- ng of the drive co-chairmen. Wally Akin, manager of the 'aramount- theater, is sponsoring he air base attraction when a number of Hollywood stars and also veterans of overseas duty with "ne Air Force will be presented. Men who are selling the tickets nust turn in reports hy late Wed lesday In order that plates to ac commodate purchases may be ar- inged for. George Barron. co-chairman olj defenses guarding the the city steering committee, told, broad Po val, business men at the meeting to obtain help of larger purchasers as well as the small buyer. He ar.d Ed Stewart, co-chairman, urged persons already exceeding their E bond allotment to become co-pur- chasers of additional bonds. Attending the meeting were Will Watson, Walter Jarrett. Homer Scott, Wilmcr Sims. Roland Jones. C. M. Calda-ell. Howard McM.ihan, (oday filed suit against the War H. M. Harrison. C. W. Gill. Will: Labor board to enjoin enforcement McCarty, W. J. Fill- j Of the boards June G order requir- ing maintenance of membership at their Chicago plant. The suit charges the board actrd arbitrarily without giving Ward's a hearing as required by the War Labor disputes act. Ward's also con- that the board's order Four hundred and sovenly-fivc Japanese dead have been counted In recent fichtinq In the Matfin Bay area of Dutch New Guinea, head- quarters announced. Maffin Bay is midway between the two other Dutch New Guinea bases of Hollandia nnd Blak. ar.d Is near the major Allied nlrbase of I Wakde Island. lh.c GumCil h" Italo-Based Bombers Busy By Glaihrln Hill Thus the prize for which the Al- lies have fought In the 21 days of thc (lays which have cost the Germans 100.000 men killed, wounded mid caplured by unofficial about to fall. But without walling for Clicr- By RAY CROS'IN Thc American flag was fly- ing atop Saipan island on Mt. Tapolchau today planted there by U. S. Marines after they (spearheaded suc- cessful atta'cks against stub- born dug-in Japanese defend- ers. The summit of the 1.554 foot vol- canic peak was reached by Amer- ican forces as other Yank troops won complete control of Magtcleryia Bay by capturing Kagman penin- sula on Salpan's eastern shore. On the western coast the Amer- ans edgid further into (he south- ern part of war-torn Garapon, ma- jor clly of the As the Yanks pressed their con- quest of the important Marianas base on the southern Hank of Nippon's homeland de- fenses, planes of the. powerful ful American task force In the Mar- lanns region blasted nearby Guam and. Rola. Other U. S. airmen carried oufc neutralization raids In the Marshall islands while Army and Navy plane.Y teamed to strike Japanese. Kurile bases In Ihe North Pacific. Developments at Saipan, news dispatches said, pave high rank- ing Allied MflceFS. confUencf, thai the A lanas was assured. The news from Ihe Marlarias was but part of the bad tiding] for Tokyo. In Southeast Asia, northern Burma and northeast India hard-pressed Japanese were losint; ground as Allied Iroopj slruelf savagely Important positions. In China's Hunan province Chin- ese troops were holding thelt ground near Hengyang, vital rail- way junction. American planes wers supporting Ihe Chinese. Chung- king confirmed Ihe fall of shan, last major barrier on thn road to Hcngyang. and reported Japanese capture of Yuhsien. Nip- U S J6 U' pon forces were fanning out widely In Hunan. It appeared that Mogaung, Ja- panese North Burma base was tot- out. headquarters announced. bourg's capitulation, Gen. Sir Ber- nard L. Montgomery cut loose the blsscst barrage ever laid down on the eastern end of thc Norm front and will) warship guns firing lering under Allied smashes froni In support off shore drove four miles three sides. Bitter fighting raged In "DCI'uola l" I south of Tilly-Sur-Scullcs to within parts ot the town. 4, to fhe Venn, a Myilkynin, No. 1 Nippon HilMS lU U1L VJL1LU.I Hltrt LUUH.Y Hin h-icol See YANKS Col. 4, Tg. I Wards Files Suit Over WLB Ruling WASHINGTON, Jur.e 26 Wilikie Assails Proposed Plank NEW YORK. June recent weeks, attacking oil refin- eries, rnllyards and an alrcrfcit Poor weather meanwhile halted temporarily the poumUng from the west of German supply nnd com- munication lines behind Ihe French Ironl. The Fortresses and Liberators nnd (lieir escorting Mustangs, Lightn- ings and Thunderbolts shol down large numbers of eiiCmy planes on southwest from Caen across (he base of the Normandy peninsula. Thc communique s.iid progress I had been mnde In [his sector nflerj tlsenhOWer KQTCS heavy fighting nnd Allied forces im- r proved their positions. rrenCfl wller. O. P. Becbe, R. M. Fielder and V. E. Behrens. Shipyards in Need Of 35rOOO Workers This local action down German reserves and Rr- moi thc main event ro.ired lo a climax In Ihe smoking streets nf Cherbourg and tn tlie. islands of re- sistance. In the remnants of u garrison of from a statement, sa'.rt he was opposed to thc proposed foreign relations pl NEW YORK. June French provisional government has "all confidence" In General Elsen- hower as a result of his giving General Kocnlg complete charge ot the French forces of the Interior, ll was said today on a broadcast by Radio Brazzaville, monitored by the National Broadcasting company. [Sec I'age 12 fnr complete story on opening Republican convention.) under consideration by the parly's national convenlion In Chicago. He called Iho plank "r.o clteclivc international four (or the surj- WASHINGTON. Jnn. 26- Thirty-five thousand irorkrrs are '__.______________________ redded for repair work in Navy yards on thc Pacilic and Maw Movirn Vntorc thousands ot others are needed Injl: r l.OTers shipyards throughout the country.' ID rOYOr 4tn Term Paul V. McMutt, War Manpower commission chairman, reported to- ALBUQUERQUE. day. and that maintenance of! prc.won of acprc-fion" ai-.d said the nvmbcrfhip and chrck-oll ot union I "ncl rfsult tc dues nre nrchibited by the National organization. Lnbor Relaiioas Wilikie sold the projwj-d plank was read lo him by telephone from Chicago this attcrnoon. Wilikie proposer! Ihe Immediate. creation of a council of thc United Nations as a first s'.cp toward Hie of s general interna- tional organization in order that The New Mexico S'.atc Democratic all the peoples o: thc The recent Naval battle in the i convention today inslmctcd Its 10-j lions wo-.ild have a voice in the do- Pacific. McNr.lt said, "has thrown' vote delcgallon to the National con-1 cision which will the future into bold relief the need for; vcntlon for a (outID term for Prrs- [world. additional manpower to niany Navy ident Roosevelt anri "-creeled Gnv. j r.ot ar.rl yard.' and private yhlp y.irris on Jnlm J. .'nr .Vntjonal, n-.-.ist not be marir hy three or the west Coasl." Democratic commii'.cem.in. i great hr Wii'.kie describee: whom he talked Ciric.ico "a declined to CHERBOURG MOP-UP MAY ME SEVERAL DAYS identify .him. Ih.MrFRATL'RIS 75 ;a s......... in r: K, s......... M XI 51.........11......... (i! t'. and :r lllett ind Ion- ni 71. TiitM: Panri'f msrnlnj: P.M. t 9.1 5 p.'m. nte 4at u "tit t'if< j t J i.i.C at machinegun and Mated'ot Chcibourg doughboys moved of HnU an pockets of resistance. to close in on thc pillboxes which i unusual hour-long rr.asjs Doughboj's still were wcrking to (still were firing from the beach clean out a tunnels and Tanks u to cnrncr chambors in Fort rin nnd B111V, Roule. was one of the bfi poJnt.s !o be Mibdupd. Fvrn lonigM no one was that all Ihe Germans liad Wrn cleared nul nf the fortress wliirh has several Icrcls set Into a, cliff In the Hotel Allnntique wore of wine, cogn.ic ar.d left behind by the Genv.ns when they See JtOP-UP, Col. 3, Fj. t today with the Central American n-iniblirji. Amli.i.v.tdnr Hrri< r n.nirl of El Salvador, for the dipbmais. il-.o St.'CCKSS ClVl'.S AM.IF.I) I'OKT the ir.tfimg ns o! .-i :-.'.iil of chcrliours and control of thc Cherbourg ncniiiMila would available ''lc wcs'cr" Kiiropfan coast al heavy supplies may he landed dirccj rccnoniic rdaiidiis ar.d i.-.e woik ofjs1l'Ps sailing from Hrilain as as from North America. Black area is I In'.er-American ager.oci, 'ritoiv. (AF   

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