Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 21, 1944 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 21, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                WAR BOND BOX SCORE Overall Quota Overall Sales Series E Quota....... Series E Sales M1.7M.50 Wet Abilene Reporter I vnilD H Y VOL. LXIV, NO. 4 HtWSFAPU 'WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR TOES WE .SKETCH YOUR WOULD EXACTLY ABILENE, TEXAS, WEDNESDAY MORNING, JUNE 21, 1944 -TWELVE PAGES___________ AHOdnted Prm (AP) United Prm FIVE CENTS JAP FLEET SHOWS K Troops Sight 'Major Port SUPREME HEADQUARTERS ALLIED EX- PEDITIONARY FORCE, Wednesday, June 21 (AP) -American rroops'itormed'to the top of last ridge barrier to Cherbourg last night and were within sight of the great port less than four miles away where the explosions o hasty German demolition threw a smoke over the city and thundered the col lapse of any Nazi hopes of a successful siege stand. A (A NBC broadcast from London said tha troops were within two njibt of Cher bourg's city limits and that the fall of the port "seems imminent." The correspondent said .Allied warships were pounding the Germans around Cherbourg and also in the Cap de La Hague area at the northwest tip of the pemn- sul 15 miles above Cherbourg.) An Allied spokesman called upon the? tens of_HwuMmils of trapped Gcrrnans to surrender. There was no other cho.ce, -Headquarters Communique No. 30, issued just before mid- night, said Allied troops, now were "attacking the outer de-, lenses arid We'iM''engagerl'm, heavy light- ing on three sides of Valognes, O'miles southeast of the prize Merkel, Rule tond Rallies Center Among top events in the Fifth War Loan drive in wes central Texas tomorrow nigh are rallies at Merkel and Rule At Merkel the 355th Army band from the Army Servic forces Training center, Cam Barkeley, will join in a pro gram to be directed by Majo David Evans, ASFTC specia service officer. ASFTC to Provide Talent at Merkel MERKEL, June the Interest ol the Filth War loa Major David J. Evans, special se vice officer ol the ASFTC, Cam Barkeley, will be the speaker at a bond rally Thursday night at the high school gymna- sium here, starting at 9 o'clock. With him will be the popular 355th Army band, under the direction of Warrant Officer Michael Leone, it is announced by Mayor H. C. West, chairman of the local bond drive. which Includes not only Merkel but 10 surrounding communities with a set quota of Another Important'event locally In the Fifth War Loan campaign is T! FORMQSA Nimitz Hints Major Battle By LEIF ERICKSON U. S. PACIFIC FLEET HEADQUARTERS, Pearl Harbor, June 20- (AP) -A Japanese naval the entire Japanese moved out between the Philippines and the invaded Marianas, Adm. Chester W. Nimitz announced tonight, hinting drarnatic- ally that a history-making battle with the American Fifth fleet already may be under way. Already it is possible that damage has been inflicted on the Japanese warships, the admiral said. f i L iuitta brought out ctr wa p upper "1's map' Ad- possibly he have heaen trying to bring the Nippons out for battle for months. "We put enough Planes Hit Oil Plants, Rockets flHCTETONQUrSG I. (he Fifth fleet to lake of that, a maior naval the Japanese people that a huf naval battle was taking shape and promised them a decisive >ort. Field dlspakhes already had re- ported American capture of Valog- LONDON, June Stalin announced tonight that the army captured Finland's sec- ond largest, city and southern gate, g way, Viipuri, today as the smash- Ing climax .to an II-day offensive in which the Soviet forces have driven 60 miles and appear to hav. plunged the Finns to the verge defeat. Stalin-announced the fall of th important seaport In a mldnlgh order of the: day, praising the units ol the Leningrad army of Marsha Leonid A. Govorov, and, within a few minutes after the announce- ment the Moscow radio declared "Viipuri's fall brings Finland to the brink of defeat." The comniander-in-chlet said the Red troops had crashed through the Mannerhcim line and "devcl- oping their offensive, overpowered the outer and inner defenses of Viipuri, and today, June 20, car- ried by assault the fortress and town of Viipuri." Later the regular nightly Moscow A communique announced that during the course of the day's drive the LONDON, June ZO An Informant with close European connections retried tonltnl that Marshal Erwin Romrr.il, German fkld commander in western France, had suffered 2 relapse and that it had Seen suggested he tire up his in- vasion front command, temporarily. .There confirmation from any other quarter of this report, whlcn slid that Rom- mel has never been in the best of'health since leavint Africa last jear. 4 bond premiere at the Queen the- atre Tuesday night. June 27, at which time "The Eulllvans" will be presented as the film feature. Ad- mission will be by ticket holder has purchased a bond In the Fifth War loan drive. This feature is being contributed by Mrs. Norman T. Hodge, manager of the theatre in the absence of her husband, in the U. S. Navy and onial troops. stacked arms on the now on overseas duty. conquered island of Elba today and Teams in the local drive started stood guard over some Ger- to work Tuesday afternoon in the man, prisoners, while Allied armies business section, with Harry Bullock on the Italian mainland slogged as chairman, and also a sub-corn- forward through the "mud ol a 30- mittee of with Owen hour downpour and kept the Nazis Robertson as chairman, began an on the rim toward the- Pisa-Flor- shattered Nazi Hlh Army near the Assault Hurled nes, ruined Montebourg, four miles to the rear, and St. Martin Le- Greard, four miles south of Cher- bourg, and late reports told of the attainment of the top of the last hill outside the city. (The German DNB news agency announced that the Allied troops reached the fortified area" of Cherbourg, and said Axis positions also were under heavy Allied, naval and air bombardment. ''Fresh U. S. infantry and tank troops now also are taking part In the assault on the broadcast said.) Of the eastern end of the front tne course 01 me uoj a un-c the Allied communique said: "Our Russians captured more than 60 positions in the area of Tilly are the bond-selling campaign. E Series Sales Lag in Abilene 361.50 here yesterday but only 937.50 was put into Series E bonds. "I can't control Japanese fleet movements" Nimitz said. "If I did there definitely would be a naval engagement. Although he did not specify what the situation was, as of Monday, he added'the significant hint that possible dam- ;e already may have been inflicted on enemy surface units. (These blows could have I fallen either from naval forces or 'carrier planes but, either way, they might mark' the first stages of the battle. The 1 I__ill- LWin-l lUUJi u-J ----i VII un active sales drive at the same time. ence-Rimini defense" line In nortn Joe Humphrey of Abilene, state cm Italy. representative, addressed the Mer- The ancient communications cen- kel Lions club Monday in behalf of ier of Perugia, 85 miles north of Rome, shook with the sound of bat- tle as Eighth Army troops expelled the last stubborn German rear- guards from its streets and build- ings. For sevtral days the enemy had braced and made a bitter stand sales Junrped on the approaches to the city, whose peacetime population was 88500 Cerman forces in the center of 937.DU was pui inio aeries LUIJUS. uerman m uis u. Thts brought Scries E purchases the peninsula were believed under reported in the Fifth War Loan orders to contest every foot of drive to leaving ground at this point so that the 305.50 to go before the Series E quota is reached. west coast might withdraw much order as possible before the Americans and French of M. Gen. Mark W. Clark's Filth Array. Peru- gia is only 12 airline miles from Florence. The French crushed .the last en- emy resistance on Elba yesterday when the 300-man garrison of Por- to Longone on the eastern shore of the historic island hoisted a while flag and surrendered Not the bag of prison- rs on Elba, it was announced that Allied forces in Italy had captur- d prisoners since they open- d their drive toward Rome on May I. American troops pushing beyond Grosseto near the west const con- tinued to take a heavy toll of the withdrawing enemy, one infantry mat LONDON, June the prevjous big naval battle of ureatest heavy bomber assault was fought out by op- history, United states Air forces si planes from carriers hurled more than Fortresses other populated places, seven railway stations. inc :luding See INVASION, Vf- 6, Col. Antis Ask .Coalition Slate By The Associated Press. A suggestion that the Republi- cans nominate a coalition ticket such as Oov. John W. Bricker of Ohio and Senator Harry F. Byrd, Virginia Democrat- came yesterday from the American Democratic na- tioiinl committee, organization op- posing a fourth term for President _ Roosevelt. w "With such a ticket we can unite with inevitable success." the com- mittee said fn a resolution adopte< at a Chicago caucus where John J. O'Connor, former New Yorl congressman, and James A. Aonc-time senator from Missouri, I were among speakers criticizing the administration. The committee's caucus sot no official recognition from Repub- licans already on hand for the party's national convention be- ginning Monday. GOP Chairman Harrison spanif- Icr expressing belief there would be no deadlocked balloting, pre- dicted to reporters the convention will nominate a presidental can- didate on Its third day and wind "up on Its fourth after selection of vice presidential nominee. ready have done much preliminary work. Senator Vandenberg (R- Mich) said in Washington that a sub committee has drafted a streamlined, shorter version of the [oreign policy declaration adopted by Republican leaders at Mackinac Island, Mich., last September. He expects lo arrive In Chicago In time to present it to the resolu- tions committee Friday morning. In Texas, the stale supreme Total of all sales was or short of the over- all quota of Of this short- age must be bonds other than Series E. Fifth War Loan speakers on KRBC today will a. m., Don H. Morris, presi- dent of Abilene Christian college. 11 a. m., O. V. Farnsworth. p. m., Jess Warren, com- mander, Parramore Post No. 57, American Legion. National Quota 16 Percent Subscribed WASHINGTON. June 20 Purchases of bonds by individuals in the Fifth War Loan drive total- led through Mondpy the Treasury announced today. Tills represented. 16 per cent of the COO.OOO.OCO quota for sales to indi- viduals in the cam- paign. 100 Degrees New High Mark Here Higher and jii IVAO.-, It's the thermometer being re- court is expected to rule today on ferred to. a move by a Demo-] YeMcrday between 4 and 5 p. m. wat tlVl rfparffs. Prisoners Kill Guard, Escape HUNTSVILLE, June W) j State and county officers tonight Entered their hunt In the Madi- onvllle-Centerville area for four 'cavlly-armcd convicts who escap- ;d In the afternoon from the Wynne prison farm after fatally shooting a guard. The convicts killed Guard George T. Preston and made their getawa: in the car of a prison official They later had a flat tire south of Madisonvllle, abandoned th car and stole another from Oil Farris. heading north through Madisonville, but from there de toured from their route towar Dallas on Highway 75 to the vll lagc of Lcona, Leon county. At Lcona they abandoned Far ris' automobile ar.d took anothe turning back toward Madlsonvll] Officers were said lo be gathering unit capturing 15 German artillery pieces yesterday. Another yank unit took prisoners ol whom were in a five-day pericd. Perugia, a provincial capital, proved the most troublesome ob- stacle, yet encountered by Allied forces north of Rome. In the past two days extensive enemy demolitions and the pouring rain slowed the Eighth Army's tanks and self-propelled artillery almost la a standstill. The effects of Allied tactical) bombing against the enemy's com-1 municallons and transport in re- cent weeks were plain to see be- ling the eighth Army's advance, lail yards were completely wrecked, with cars blown off the tracks and switches and towcro smashed to rubble. The towns, however, were but little damaged. Perugia, one of the oldest and and Liberators against Hitler's Eur- ope today to smash once at 1Z Oer- man oil plants and twice at the rocket-bomber coast of France, which also was attacked through- out the day by olher Allied planes. More than heavy bombers least equal to the largest force ever sent on a single Ihundcrod to the continent, smack- ing the 'pilotless-plane launching platforms In Pas De Calais and continuing across Germany almost to Poland In the first operation ot the heaviest daylong assault ever made. Then In th.r lingc'rlnr day- light of this evening another force of about 500 Fortress and Liberators returned lo hurl more explosives on the fas de Calais installations from which the Germans have been launch- ing their winged rnckct bombs since last Thursday nlghl. Forty-seven bombers and 10 hundred Japanese planes, to have been carrier-based 'the presence of enemy in trie nrea, "s they were Southern Half OfSaipanlsle WASHINGTON, June inching forward against heavy en- hot down attacking the American'Umy artillery fire, American troops ask forces and today h'imltz said I nave taken the southern half-of ncmy plane losses since the Inva- gM ]argcst In the western ion operations opened In the Mar- Pacific Marianas group. Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, Pad tic fleet commander, announced to- night that forward lines now ex- tend from the shore of Maglclenni bay on the southeast side of the is- land to the outskirts of Garapan, I principal town on Saipan Nimilz. whose announcements and y have moved up artil.ery to that the ennmy so far has been 9way the enemy's big guns, able to replace plane losses In the Amerjcan bombers and straiing lighter planes are Joining in the hrv lull. offshore warships are advantage of land-based air rccon- pouring shells onto enemy post naissance west of the Marianas and aons the American fleet has as its first j continue obligation the protection of the I onus approaches GOO. "Thai's lol of he commented. "If we lost 6M Xaval planes In two or three days we'd be very unhappy, even with our plane production." Salpan Invasion troops. With their reconnaissance ruitj flehters were missing from all ihe day's operations, while 68 enemy vantage. The Japanese decided Sun- unj upv i i__ l j__it.-., m destroyed, 41 by the escorts of the heavy bombers. Between attacks by the largest total force of heavy bomhers ever put up In one day. the Allies made at least four other assaults against the rocket nests wilh every tvpc of daylight bomber based In Bri- tain. American Marauders and Havocs Pew against these emplacements j twice and returned without loss. The RAP sent Mitchell medium I their advance, other units to the ad-1 rear are heavily'attacking 'strong of resistance" left behind also reported bombard- alrflel of Salpan. Tn ad- day they had enough Information lo launch carrier-based plane strikes Klmnz also on Ihe fleet, the admiral noted. f Japanese airfields on Tin- "Thcy have made a very strong o( Salpan. Tn ad- but tcok a very severe beat- h jhclllng by wnrshlps, mg In losing 300 carrier type planes. m Monday See JAP Fl.F.ET, Ff. 6, Col. 2 inn bomber planes on Monday attack- ed the Tinian fields. best known (h? towns of bomhcrs Boston light bombers and Central Italy, was once called the Central Italy, was once cae e "capital of the Fascist revolution" I from the fact that it was the 122 headquarters for leaders who or- ganizcd the "March on Rome." It Typhoon fighter- against the same Installa- By Aajk lrom 4000 to 4.500 tons of expiosivcs had rained down from was a pre-war mecca for students bays of at least 3.000 A The Sylvester Grocer Backs Flying Son interested in renaissance The to-xn itself occupies a commandiiie Officers were sam lo DC gainemvg t on a rldgc Ihrre in their hunt for the M t abovc'lhe tjmbrlan plain ed convicts, bne of whom was! _____ cratic faction to have Democratic j the temperature presidential electors chosen In the July 22 primary- The regular Texas Democratic convention named electors and stipulated they were not bound to cast Texas' electtoal vote for the party's presidential nominee If the national convention fails to heed the Texas convention's demandson racial and other issues. The pro Roosevelt forces bolted the con vention and named a rivsl dele- gation to the national convention Similar threats that the electoral vole may be withheld from the Democratic nominee have been raised in Mississippi and South Carolina, and the issue may com ilghcr-lhan-90 weather. Tomorrow's forecast Is In other words, hot. ThE merctuy has sone a little higher each Monday, 93 Sur.day. cd vice nresldenta nomnee. The ons committee gets up tomorrow at a meeting of 1h, to wrk today on propos- Georgia Democratic executive com platform. Subcommittees al-'mittee, drgrcrr. a Bell county sentence of I 99 years for murder. Preston, 56. was shot to death at the farm early In the afternoon by one of the convicts who had a i pistol. Thr fo'.ir men then raided heavily armed when they took [o the highway in an automobile be- longing to Capt. R. H. Baughn. manager of the. farm. The Wynne prison farm is lo- cated three mi'.fs northwest of Huntivllle and the main plant of The Weather i [ightcrs. In tl.etr Ihltd mlsOon cf (lie day. hoppnl acrow the rlunnrl We this cvrnln- if, attack i (irrmnn tun battery at the coastal tnwn of lloiil- ralr on Hie Ml flank of Al- lied beach posilions. TIFPARTMFNT OF COilMEKt r trm.ENF. ANN VlCINirV: Tilr Ivr.ST TEXAS: EAST TEVAS: knrniir. f.tffl I rallrced IhnndfrlTiivwrTI Fair the penitentiary. The escapees were: Leonard C. Stockton, 45. serving IS years for robbery with firearms from P.ito Pinto county; W. M. Johnson. 3D, serving eight nounced today, special emergency i years for burglary from Hardln Trade Offered DALLAS. June help absorb the surplus ot She Of- fice of Price Administration allotments of sug.ir will be mane lo manufacturers who will increase the use of eggs in their food prod- ucts allowed addi- tions] sugar for the third quarter up to 5 per cent ol the quota base. Tan. Harris and Liberty counties: James McLemore, 28, sen Ing 20 years for robbers with firearms from Caldwcll county, and Eugene Padgett. 28. serving 99 years for murder from Bell county. llifh ir.ri tan U TliundrrboH fishlrr-bombrrs. rr- Vermind attacked German! jponrhr.B to an call from 11 eun hnidins up the Al-, on the Chrromr? pen-1 On' group fhnt down four O'.i'- of six enemy planes. In all phases ot today's opera- tions the Allies probably made fome 6 000 Individual flights nr.d dropped about 8.000 tons of bombs. As the procession of heavyweights across the channel, the ndng explosives the L Calias arm of Fr.ir.cf While L, AU i of L: u7d 'MUCKS "n ihe ?rocer. Is doirK his own part LT. Ij.f.l .TAMFS D. JOSF.V SYLVESTER. June gl James D. 2" part in the invastc a in the window of the Josey sto-c which reads "T pledge to put into bonds the night of the Fifth War Loan rally June 23 every cash dollsr taken In by this store be- tween now and Ihe tirr.e of the rally" Lieutenant Josey. whose parer.W have bten merchants Sylvester many years, pilots a Gniman Aven- ger torpedo bomber and since go- ne overseas last summer r.e has not been able to tell the folks back home much about his duties, ex- cept !hat his snuanron operates over water and never over land. F-nlisting June 18, 1W2. In the naval air corps. Lieutenant Josey trained at Corpus Christl, Dallas, Miami. Fla. Fort Lauderdale, Fla, Seattle, Wash., El Centre, Calif, ar.d Sim Diego. He was commission- ed at Corpus Christl Dec. 16, 1941 mid served in (he Pad tie. theater be-fore going lo the European area. Born at Slyvesler Nov. S- 1922, hy finished high school there in 1940 and graduated North Texas Arlington, in c Baswell of TallapooM. Ga. in Seat- FcTseveral day, there has been tie. Wash., in Auput,   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication