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Abilene Reporter News: Sunday, June 18, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 18, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                WAR BOND BOX SCORE Overall Quota Overall l.tfS.OM.OO Series Quota.......l.ZSS.OM.M Series E "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO OR FOES WE SKETCH WUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT SUNDAY VOL. LXIJI, NO, 266 A TEXAS 3-U, NEWSFAPUt ABILENE, TEXAS, SUNDAY MORNING, JUNE 18, 1044 PAGES ltt THREE SECTIONS Associated rrm (AP) VnUti Prm IVf.) PRICE FIVE CENTS Peninsula Trap Virtually Shut Counties Make in Bond Push Many West Texas counties were beginning to make big headways large quotas In the Fifth War lota drive, according to figures released by county bond chairmen throughout the area. There was much activity throughout the territory In the first week the drive with several Snyder, Cross Plains and Bal- rallies yesterday. Here's how nearby counties are stacking up against their overall Quotas for the campaign: Total Sales Callahan .Jfoke.................................... Hasfcell.................................. Howard Jones..................................... Mitchell -Afolan.................................... 'Runnels................................. Scurry 112.329.25 Taylor Kidnapping Charge Faces of Soldier Overall Quota I 8so.ooa.oo 360.000.00 ily jJond Purchases 'Would Meet Goal Taylor 'county must buy afc least in series E war bonds and in other types of bonds each business day if it exceeds its Fifth War Loan Drive quota by July. 12, end of the campaign. That's a to- tal of in bond purchases per day. _  n the Initial story of her disap- pearance. Despite Mrs. Hinojosas1 statement hat the child was her own niece Scl oley overseer of the hall as a lardin-Simmons officer and who lad assigned her to a room on cer- Iflcalion from the Travelers Aid refused to let her leave the bulld- ng and called police. -Mrs. Gutz- kow came with officers and iden- :lflcd the child. Return of Janet to her aunt end- ed an exhaustive 18-hour search of he town that began about 6 o'clock Friday evening-when Mrs. Gutzkow reported to police -that a woman known to her only as Elizabeth Ann lad taken lanet shopping, promis- ing to return a. few minutes. The'women'had mef In the Ah! lene-Vjey bus depot cafe while both were waiting husbands They'went .together "to parlt where n third woman wa waiting with Janet, Mrs. Hinojosa said. Mrs. Gutzkow consented tc let the child go with the compara tive stranger. Tn. a statement made to Dist. Ally. Esco Walter, Mrs. Hinojosas said she was gone about an hour and 'a half and when she returned to the meeting place, park, Mrs. Gutzkow was gone. "We could not find her so I took the girl home with me..I told the ladies at my home she was mine, and kept her last night" Mrs. Hino- josas' statement read. "This mom- ing Mr. Schooley was there with a woman and I told him that the child was mine. He told the po- lice and the child's mother were looking for the baby and then after ELIZABETH ANN HINOJOSAS Gains Made on Elba; By: LYNN HEINZERLING Yanks Widen Saipan Hold; Fight Bitter By LEIF ERICKSON U. S. PACIFIC FLEET HEADQUARTERS, PEARL, HARBOR, June Battling determined Japanese resistance, United States Ma- rines and Army troops have expanded the beachhead on southern Saipan to a maxi- mum depth two miles along a five and one-half mile front, Adm. Chester W. Nimitz an- nounced tonight in a com- munique. In frenzied fighting through Thursday nlglit and Friday assault forces made gains averaging yards and captured the village ot Hlmashlsu, more than half way cross the island from the beach- iead. These developments were repott- ed shortly after It was disclosed hat American warships had bom- arded Guam for the first time Ince that former U. S. outpost In he Marianas was captured by the "apancso In December, 1941. Before dawn Friday, Jap de- fenders of Saipan, numbering an estimated two divisions 000 men.1, launched a determin- ed counterattack. The enemy thrust, supported by iinks, was hurled bark.. Twenty-five Jap tanks were destroyed and the enemy cost In lives WM heavy. The communique said the area now controlled by the American :orces on tho southwest side ol Safpan-'exterjtls' ffom .a point Garapan five and onG-haH miles southward to a village nearly halfway across Satpan's blunt .southern end Before launching their counter- attack, the Japs maintained many Temperature to 93 For the second straight day the mercury hit S3 degrees Saturday, Cmarking the sixth day in a row for 90 or above weather. SCISOM! high was 95 degrees on April 51. I saw that he knew about it, I told him about the child.." She bought Janet some food. new socks, and Friday night gave her a bath, wshcd her hair and played her for some-time in the lob- by of Cowden-Paxton hall, Mrs. See KIDNAPPING, Pj. 15, Col. S German Robots nu Jduy neie uiia Miieuiutui BUU- _ to Runnels county's 1 for the Fifth War Loan drive. rXTPlllI nounced W. J. Hernbrce, county LAIUllU ROME' June troops Janded today on Elba, five miles west of the Italian mainland, and by night- fall had won control of one-fifth of that Napoleonic exile island against German resistance which Allied headquarters described as strong at some places. Nearby Pianosa was secured quickly without opposition, but the German garrison and coastal artillery were making a scrap for Elba's 85 square miles. Conquest of Elba would keep the Allied sea flank abreast of the advance on the mainland, where Allied troops today rolled steadily forward toward the Germans' Pisa Florence-Rimini line. Known as "Detachment the French attacking Elba were com- manded'by Gen. Jean de Lattre de Tasslgny arid transported and sup ported by American, British and French naval units. Allied Air Fore es that included French squadrons bombed the Island. (The Berlin radio sold the land ings were made both at the south At Rocket Base SUPREME HEADQUARTERS A I, L I E D EXPEDITIONARY FORCE, Sunday, June British bombers struck back at the Gentians early today as the Nazis continued lo fire their flying bombs at southern England. (The lerman radio-said that'the Berlin area was. being raided.) A great fleet of RAP planes crossed the east coast during the night, headed. toward the Reich, after other Allied bombers had de- livered a series of powerful blows throughout the afternoon and ear- ly evening against the Pas de. Ca- lais coast of northern France from Thousands ol Nazis Facing Annihilation By JAMES M. LONG SUPREME HEADQUARTERS ALLIED EXPEDITION- ARY FORCE, Sunday, June U. S. Ninth divi- sion, which shattered the Germans at Bherle in Tunisia, learned up yesterday with the 82nd airborne division in a powerful break-through of German lines which put the Americans on high ground only four miles from the west oast and virtually cut in two the Cherbourg peninsula. Thousands of German troops were on the verge being rapped inside Cherbourg port, 18 miles north of the corridor driven west of captured St. Sauveur, said a front dispatch rom Don Whitehead, Associated Press correspondent. The vest coast road was under American artillery bombardment, Lt. Gen. Omar N. Bradley, _ riSst'iS s Doughboys Look: town Corridor' toufe of Escape steady mortar and artillery fires on American positions throughoul Ihe night. American warships countered n-llh ihelllngj of enemy strong- point: After repelling the Jap counter- American assault troop launched the offensive which push- ed forward for general advances o yards. The points of deepest penetra- tion arc two miles Inland from Sal- pan's western shore and the light- ing line now skirls the western edge of Asllto airdrome which has a foot tighter 'strip. In the Friday push, forward American echelons drove Into Ihe naval air base at Aslilo airdrome but lalcr had lo be withdrawn under severe enemy fire. This Is the second officially announced withdrawal under enemy pressure and highlights the ferocity ot the struggle with Ihe strong defending Jap force. Carrier bombers and fighters and north ends of the island, one of Offcn5lve wlth them Just west of Ms major city of Porto Ferraio. A German com- munique told of heavy fighting stm on1' against "weak bombing and strafing attacks on Jap positions. In a dramallc. single ship ex- ploit, n World War I destroyer, con- verted Into an attack troop trans- The Weather AS: lo pirdr tlnir Mondr. Net qDlte U. 8. DEPARTMENT OF COMXEKCE WEATHER BVBEAV ABILENE AND VICINITY: clftslr Sandajr. ContftCciibfe eloidt- nrll wUh WEST TEXAS: tfovtiJ and In Fxnhantle Stniaj- So. Ill rutnl Manor- SeallcttJ tfc dtnhowrrs In Tlcl RU-Titlt Fait ar EAST TEXAS: Ctnliacrablc nm In loulh forlUn. partly cloady Itvtth poilion SandlT. Ocrnlo and ta tenth d fn etlreme A band from Goodfello San Angelo famished music for today's sale. A bond show here Friday night by the Abilene Army Air base add- ed to drive's total. Since the opening of the drive, Winters has raised for bonds. Miles, and Rowcnti, Snyder Vets Speak At- Home Bond Rally SNYDER, June 17 The members of Snyder's Company G and another local serviceman, all home from the war, were the prin- cipal speakers for Fifth War Lean [FORCE, Sunday June ellow field at More ot thc Germai Ti Sunday poillnn Sandar. 11 is u 11 II !T 19 HOIB I.... I.... S.... Sal. Til P.M. it M ill 92 91 91 92 Hlfh and lempcratBTti 9 p.m 93 and II. Hllh law limt lilt 1 tail ?S and tsanitl Tail nfthli SvitrFFe tbli mornlnr: 117, their pilotless plane bombs. The pilotless planes have been striking England for the last 48 hours and the air ministry an- nounced last nighl that enemy ac- tivity over southern England In Ihe afternoon caused damage and cas- ualties In number of places. While selected squadrons of U. S. Flying Fortresses and Liberators and RAF Spitfires hit the Pas de Calais region one thousand other American heavy bombers and fiRht- nljht as the Nazis', "counler-tnva- j crs ranged over the length and slon atlack" moved into its fourth I breadth o! the Normandy fighting BY 1YES GALLAGHER SUPREME HEADQUARTERS L L I E D EXPEDITIONARY VP] ians' winged bombs, the so-called robot planes, came burning across the channel Into soulhcrn England during the laib cuaal VI nonnern nance irom _ raiirhl five Inn rnasl-ll rarnn which the Nazis are launching, German garrison" defending .he Is- Irfursday and" oi A slory discussing operation of the robots is found on page six. consecutive I front in direct support of the In- In the newest attacks they came'vaslon troops. The tempo ol the over the coast low and singly even' 1 aerial assaults increased during the few minutes. Several of them flea- through some of the heaviest anti- aircraft tin: of the war as Britain shifted its ack-ack defenses to in Fran-e wrre Wafted. counter the devilish plane-bombs. Damage was caused in various lo- calities a number of persons bond rally held on the court house jw't're' 'killed" or" injured" One'dl'the afternoon and cvcnlr.g as the land.) Fighter-bombers aided yes- terday In preparations for (he landings, destroying a fuel dunvp; scoring six hits on Is- land's rjrifo station, and strik- ing at boats anil dock Installa- tions at Porto Tcrraio, Marino dl Campo and Torlo Lonjonc. British Eighth Army troops drove 12 miles north of Orvieio and oc- cupied Montelcor.e, nbout 4i miles east of Grnsselo. A bit farther east, armored clcmenlA pushing north from Tcdl reached a. point 13 miles south of Perugia, reported held by the Germans in some strength. them. Ships of this destroyer transport type carry light guns and auto- matic antl-aircratt weapons. Twenty-nine survivors of the enemy ships were picked up and made prisoners. This makes the to-! umph of Bizerle in May, 1943, vas directing the swift break- hrough which had rolled to vithin a mile of St. Lo-D'Our- illc on the west coast ast possible German escape mite out of Cherbourg. Some front dispatches said the Germans were fleeing southward o escape the American Irap, but General Bradley earlier had pre- dicted a bsl-dltch German stand Cherbourg, whose harbor Is :1 to the Allies in order to ten supplies and reinforce- ments. German broadcasts last right, however, began minimizing Cherbourg's Importance, which could mean Nazi resignation to its eventual Isolation and capture. Civilian refugees said Germans already were forcing civilians to evacuate the.city. American troops were lighting fierce hand-ta-hand battles In the streets of U southeast of. Cherbourg: _'v-. Whlieheid'i divin- ed fhe' presence Nlnlh Division In icUort the time In The njs the dWsIon which look Tori Lyiuley In the. French Morocco landing In November, 1913, foujM at El Oueltar In Southern Tunisia, and-partici- pated In the final eneircle- mtnl of scores of thousands ef Germans and {Ullans on Cap Bon. North ot St. Sauveur. Whitehead said, the Yank Infantrymen broki across the Douve river. They rodi on tanks and Ilrcd machine-gun: as the armored units plunged through shallow waters In the his lortc drive to seal off Cherbourg. American airmen were stralini the German lines of retreat out o thc area. One front line' corresponden said an American column rollei through St. Jacfl.ucs-de Nehou, fou miles northwest of St. Sauvcu and seven miles from the wes coast, in a swift exploitation o Gcrmnn disorganization. TV.e two American divisions hai heavy support from artillerymen Whitehead said their fire alread had effectively cul the west coas road. c o m m u n Ique 21 Issued Just before mld- nijhl merely announced that "Allied forces have pushed deeper Into Normandy'1 in irhtch swept through SI. Sauveur and reached the Vlrt- et-Vaulc canal south of Isisiiy. Villages cast and west of Tilly- Sur-Seulles on the Hrlllsh end of the front also were captur- ed, II said. Front dispatches said the Cher of SOI survivors from Jap ships bourg peninsula already had bee made prisoners since the battle ot Saipan started a week ngo In soft- ening up carrier attacks. A total of 21 ships of lighter-bombers also were strafin nil types have L-cen sunk. weather cleared. Seven ot the Ger- Jn (hl: Adriatic sector, thc Brit- mans' rapidly dwindling air fields lawn Saturday afternoon. Bringing a message home from Company O now fighting in Italy, We're still winning." was First Egt. L. A. Crenshaw ol Snyder. Sergeant Crenshaw, on a relation fur- 1'ugh came to Snycler direct from the battle area. He was wounded months ago but has been in service since then. Pvt. James. W. Hcadslream and S-St. John C. Portls. atso of Com- pany G, arrived In Snyder from hospitals where they have been re- covering from wounds. Sgt. Thayr.e W. Mebane of the air force also spoke. The four were interviewed by M E. Stanflcld, chamber of com- merce manager. Forest G. Sears, chairman of the drive for scurry announc- ed that approximately of Sw BOND SALES, Pf. 15, Col, 1. flying bombs was reported to have wiped out tour houses. (German radio commentators let their Imagination run free In des- The Paris radio reported thc town of Llsicux In flames after a furious raid. LIsleux, 40 miles east of Caen, is an important I Junction roads running to Caen and north to Trouville on the coast. The daylight operations against the robot targets cost thc cribing reports of the cpnftcma- Americans two heavy bombers and lion caused in England by the ro-lone fighter. In addition five other hots. fighters and nine fighter-bombers (One Berlin broadcast credited a were missing from Ihe various aer- Slockholm dispatch as snyins thc.'lal acllvlty of til" U. S. forces. At British government had ordered the j least ten enemy planes were dcs- cvacuation of London because air troyed. including three on the raid shelters'failed to offer ade- ground, mjate protection. Another said "England is ircmbling and London Is ablaze" and Jtill another reported that or. Friday afternoon tremen- dous fires aloniz the southern Bri- in! Sole Attractive ___ ___ ____ BOO.VVILLE, Mo.. June- 17 -If, tlsh coast had been observed from The annual Hereford sale at the Rouen. France. Rouen is approxl-' Wilbur C. Windsor farm attracted mately iOO miles from the buyers seven states, with coast! j 58 high grade nnimaU auctioned. There was no Indication from eny j Huscher Brothers snd Payne of point in southern England of un-! Kigs'.raville, Mo, paid a top cl usual movements of the population. [125 lor i bull. ish made contact w'.th Partisan forces already In possession of Tcr- amo, 15 miles from the coast and 30 miles northwest of Petcara. Rail snd road bridges In the Florence-Pisa-Bologn.i area were attacked by mt-diuui and fighters ripped roads, rail lines. bridge.', motor transport and roll- ing stock there, the Allied commu- nique said. Tht Mediterranean Air Force took a heavy loil of fncmr craft In wldesprcarl alUcks, destroy- ing TO at a tost 12 heavy bombers a'nd nine other planes. Tn addition, ficlim a'.Urlied fncmy conccnlradotu In Vujco- slavla, desirojlnjr a Urt.e num- ber of motor vehicles. The Fifth Army was expected to take quick advantage of Its cap ture of Grosseto by usir.? the air facilities there for attacks on Nazi prepared positions in Ihe northern Apennines, whore foothills touch Florence, Pisa ar.rt Livomo. The latter, Just below Pisa on the coast, U in Important naval base. virtually cut in two since the we: coast road now was within rang of American light artillery an By DON WH1TEHEAD WITH THE ON THE CHERBOURG EN1NSULA, June 17 uerkan doughboys stood on eights overlooking the sea today nd looked down across the nar- corridor which Is the Ger- ans' only escape route from icrbourg peninsula. With breathtaking swiftness ge the magnificent fighting inth infantry division broke trough with the nld of ighty-Secpnd Airborne division to osc a. fisi of Iron on the neck 'of he .peninsula where thousands ot ermans ?re threatened with.en- With machine pans cinnon has only rtjid ninnlnf own the.' vuUrri nemy's .last, exit route virtually. See nOL-GHBOl'B, IS, CoL f im A fishing excursion to Fort Phah- om Hill lake for three youths had tragic ending Saturday with .rownhig of Billle Glenn Moore, Abilene high school unlor. Yo-.mg Moore, oniy child of Mr. ind Mrs. Glenn Mcore, 3633 South st. was standing In a small boat with an oar when he lost SITUATION IN troops last night Icokc down from lofly liciglils on the main escape route for t! Germans in Cherbourg, virtually assured of trapping thous- ands of the Nazis. The peninsula was virtually cul half in two. B1LL1E GLENN MOORE his balance .and fell from Ule craft, witnesses said. The other two also were reported to have fallen from the boat. Billic Glenn, who could not swim, went under. The other boys. It reported, could not locate him and swam to shore some 40 feet away for help. In Hif test with the Mpcre youth were Edwin Gainis and Billy Young, according to n report of the city fire department. Firemen were called to the scene at a. m. and the body was re- covered from the cast side ot the lake near the city piunphouse at by use ot grappling equip- ment. Time of the accident wai given as 9 ft. m. Funeral for Bffiie Glenn will held at 5 p. tn. today at the Kiker- Warren chapel with the Rev. W. C, Ashford. pastor ot the Baptist church, officiating. Survivors, In addition to the psr- cnw, are the paternal grandpar- ents. Mr. and Mrs. Tom O. o! Abllcr.e. and the maternal grand- father, Uxley Nexman of Abilene. Billle Glenn tvas bom in j. on Oct. 28.1328. and had livci f all his life. He was employed at the' Paramount theater after scixu! hours and during vacation Pallbearers will be Bobby Giinie, Dwnyne Baker, Bobby O'Brien! bert Waldro'p, Herschel Jeter Ml Bobby   

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