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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 15, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 15, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                WAR BOND BOX SCORE Overall Quota Sales Series E Quota Seriei E Salei MORNING LXIII, NO. 263 A TEXAS MCWSPAPn 'WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TOPRIENDSJR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT THURSDAY MORNING, JUNE 15, 1944 -FOURTEEN PAGES ABILENE. TEXAS, Prns IAP) United rrni PRICE FIVE CENTS Fresh Nazi Troops Press Parifir Vtiw. MakplDEOAULLEGOBTOFRANCE; GREETED BY CHEERS raUlll JlllUj nKHVG B, D0x I ISIGNY.' France, June rtramnMr. background liberated by the Allies, tc Deepest Penetration By LEONAED MILLIMAN Associated Press War Editor France, June Gen! Charles de Gaulle visited his homeland today for the first time In four years and countrymen lined the streets of beachhead vll lages shouting his name. The ovation was dramatic. The tall, lean leader of the French Committee of .National Lib- eration appeared ii news of his trip across the chan- Two American naval- task forces operating mues i, jwept througn Aiued-held ter- apart on the Pacific, simultaneously shelled the southern rjtory ln Iew hours. Wherever Marianas'islands and the central Kurile islands Monday in he went, crowds.gathered to the fetation of Japan's defenses by Allied war- a glimpse of him and call greet- ------------------------ships. Cries of ..De Gauiiep D, Gaulle' Coordinated air ramsUwept the slreels. Old meri am smashed at supporting Nippo-j women came stumbling out of the nese air bases. Both attacks wreckage of their homes .and continued into Tuesday. U houses. At least 20 of 50 Japanese across tne dcbrts to thls man nterceptors were shot down I whose name obviously was magic over the Palau islands in a to them, fierce'air battle by Gen. Doug- las MacArthur's- Liberators protecting the southwestern flank of the Marianas force. ,i WASHINGTON, June 14 Ej ht others. were probably Tne House passed the price con e Price Control Bill Passed; Oil Boost Stricken Uol extension bill today after strlk ing out the'controversial.Bankhead Brown cotton amendment and writ Ing in provision aimed at guar parity prices for pro by penalizing processors wh fail to pay .them. The Bankhead-Brown proposa which is in the version of the. bill passed last weet by the Senate, .require adjustment o! textile tiling's to reflfct parity to farmers also to guarantee ncanufactur- GENERAL DE GAULLE eentuated the dramatic background of .the French fight for liberation. There was no mistaking the spon- taneity of the welcome. The voices of the people rose In shout as De Gaulle appeared. de Gaulle." "Vive la France." "Vive 1'Amerlque." "Vive la 'A bas les Bodies, a bas les Col- laborateurs." It was' a chant that ran through the crowd and then as-thought It was a theme song for the occasion came tho sound of voices singing la Marseillaise.'" De Gaulle stepped fromn Jeep jnd Ihe gendarmes were unable to hold Ihe .crowd back. They surg- ed forward to speak to the gen- eral nnd shake hands with him as he .stood under a shell-dented street lamp in the lown'j battered i square. people of ______ In France liberated by the Allies, lo help in the battle to free the country, Ca- nadian Press Correspondent Wil- liam Slewart said In a dispatch from the beachhead. '.The general said he had comi lo Normandy to salute the city o Bayeux and he announced the ap polntment of a local representa live. have seen the enemy fie from here and he will floe furth er" De Gaulle said. "We will flgh lo the end. We will fight by th side of our Allies for the sover eignty of France so lhat our vie lory will be the victory of fre people." De.Gaulle drove Into Islgny miles west of Bayeux) with a grou of French army officers in thr Jeeps and an amphibious naval v hide guarded by an escort of du ty American mllilary pollcem armed with carbines. tag costs plus to millers. 'reasonable profit1 Difficulty Faces Reds at Finland By RUSSELL LANDSTROM LbNDON, June Finnish aircraft 'roops'have been thrown into' the defense of the Karelian were snot down over BUk' isthmus and are now locked in a mighty 2o northwesTemSew Guinea where miles south of Vilpuri. Finland's second largest city, Moscow rerocious Battling. In France Continues By JAMES M. LONG SUPREME HEADQUARTERS, Allied Expeditionary Force, Thursday, Juno battles roared at both ends of the Allied lines in Normandy today, With the Germans pressing constant heavy counter-attacks against which th'e British-Canadian forces stood firm in the Tilly- Caen area but which cost the Americans their hold on Monte- beachhead the Arne, icans repulsed a German attack on Carentan, and the Allies generally advanced, southward, it was announced. The Germans have thrown I at least two fresh armored a total of Largest Armada knocked down and many more demolished on the ground. The' out at mid- day Sunday, blew up ammuni- tion dumps and left fires blaz-1 ing. 'Seven raiding Nipponese airc were shot1 down over northwestern New Gull the Japanese, garrison began firing indicated, early today. six inch guns in an effort to stop Evideiice the ferocity of towBOro- the battle on Russia's north- Virtually all the House Repub- licans joined with administration forces against -the. textile, pricing which was beaten 87 to 191. The administration gave its .appro- val to the psrlty-or'-penalty amend ur -The naval bombardment of the ern front was contained Marianas where a hornet's nest of I midnight supplement to the enemy fighters was .stirred up Soviet communique wh'ich hree das ment. rt- V U arc Invasion of some Island in the vl- wiped out in three, days clnity-ot Guam was imminent of the enemy, destroyed E Bond Sales Slower Here 'ask fqrces accompanying carrier! JQ guns and 80 machine-guns normally open their captured 70 oih.ef guns." administration's cotton .oil victories were somewhat offse by failure, In a 206 to 181 roll call to Bmnrcatf SB amendment by .Rep. to open federal dis- trict courts to of OPA rules ..With the House changes, Ma- Leader McCorrhack; (D-Mass) Mid Vherewas an "excellent chance. of perfecting In conference a.bUl which President Roosevelt would approve. Without the legislation, price con- frols expire June 30. McOormack's bas- on e'upeclation that Sen- ate and House conferees, correlat- ing the separate measures, will throw out the Bankhead-Brown party amendment which the House approved Overwhelmingly by vcl-e vote-provides that any pro- cessor of an agricultural commodi- ty-who faJls to pay parity price may charge no more than 90 per of the OPA celling price for the American _, Iri continuing re'ports juppiemeht- Mid, and added that task forces were still "on the scrae. were 'uken. 'salvos from' battleships, cruisers "P1' resislance of the Finns 'arid' 'destroyers' started fires in -two and- the rrarshy nature of the ter- tbwns. and Tanapa? harbor on Sal- ln-m which rntde. tanks almost use- pan iri the Mariana's. Nearby Tin- iah also was snelled but results __; ta Mme wctlons Apparently finished article. tozis Forecast mportantMove were not announced. Carrier planes struck at Pagan island, a satellite ulty. base, and the fifth In the Maria- nas'to be raided. A total of 141 enemy planes have been .destroy- ed in' the four day raid and 60 prisoners picked up fro'.n the sea. Matsuwa island in the Kurlles less than 500 miles from the Nip- ponese mainland, was shelled. Na- val planes blanketed airfields'on Paramushiro and Shumush'u with On the continent the -Chinese reported they had checked Japa nese drives while pushing the! own advances' along" the Burma road.' All attacks on beleaguered Changsha by 200.000 "Japanes from nine -divisions were beate back. The enemy has the ke railway town hemmed in on thre sides. To the north an Invaders pus toward Tungkwan, key to" north west China, jiras hailed by a coun ternttsck. One of three Japanese columns slashing at Chinese on the Bum oad south of Lungling was repor cd defeated, continuing fighting was reported within 40 miles of he enemy's headquarters at Teng- ing th: Soviet forces diffi- The points they announced cap- ureil during yesterday's heavy ighting were .too-small to show on maps'-available .here. German commentators continued o regard the battle on the Fin- While mahy large bond purchases lave been or are In the process o Tuday's War bond. Ridie Station. a. ML i. C. Benun. p. E. McKinite. nish front as merely a prelude- to bigger -action yet.to begin on the eastern front. A iransocean broadcast from Berlin emphasized that "the German command expects the main blow (he Immi- nent Soviet of fen live In the south" and added, "the So- viets will strike In the east when fithtinf western Europe b in full Moscow's only mention of other sectors of the front was an as- sertion 'that .German reconnals- than on Tuesday. George Barron, co-chairman of j the city EteerlfiS comrr.ittcc, Series E purchases' are holding up fairly well "but they're not keeping the pace of the large bond sales. County leaders are stressing the sale of the F. securities since.about a -thl-d of the overall quota Is ear- marked'for that series.' Work of the employe sales group has proved disappointing so far, Barron said. Letters were sent ear- lier to the employers of the city asking ;Kem to collect information and be ready: to confer with bond workers in setting up quotas for each business. Many employers, Barron reported, have not cooper- ted with the plan and have kept ampaign workers waiting when hey called. Captains of the bond sales teams are to meet at a. m. Friday at the chamber of commerce bulld- ng to report progress of their work. four into five successive counter-attacks in the 20-mile, stretch from Troarn on live U -jrfr east through Caen and Tilly- DlClilj LUIUUC Sur-Seulles in what headquar- ters described in its midnight communique as "a furious at- tempt to stem our advance." The Allies there, however, ar- By AljSTlN BEALMIAR -holding firm and vigorously search- SUPREME HEADQUHTERS lug out weak points" In the enemy ALLIED EXPEDITIONARY at'a-ks, headquarters stated. FORCE, June 14 -W- Led by Tffly-Sur-Seullcs was believed to more than U. S. Fortresses and. be in German' hands, but fighting Liberators- the mightiest single air. there was fluctuating, and the Brit- armada ever launched the Allied apparently retained command! alrforces hit Hitler's Europe with of high ground around the town. more than plane sorties by daylight today In probably the great- est all-day operallons since .thet Normandy Invasion June 6. An Indication that the RAF was following up the record daylight assault by the American: came u all German radio stations left the" rui-ther west the German.? at-1 air In the night. tJkrf vlclS "t Carentan, key The wide-spread operallons from tacked Mciou-iy-n tlooa-mg Britain encountered a minimum X it the Cherbourg aerial opposition although Troirn changed hands Mreral limes was reported lmrply-helt by the An Allied MJnkcsmin street M conllmimi Inert. In Italy Ca BT LYNN HE1NZERLING i ello, center of German resistance to ROME, June 14 -W_ American the Fifth 'Army's offensive, and forces driving up the Tyrrhenes gained control of the enemy s Im- :oast of Italy have'captured Orbet- mense food supply dumps on the __________ nearby Orbetello peninsula (Mt. Ar- LONDON, June propagandists tonight forecast "1m- events" on the Atlantic coast within 48 hours, reported lim- lled U. S. gains on the Carentan front and said huge Nazi reserves were being -rushed up for an im- minent major battle at Caumonl arid Vlllers-Bocage, south of Bayeux radios said Allied fleet movements in the channel and ac- tivity In English ports indicated blows were coming, and a Berlin DUB broadcast reported Le Havre was bombed by "super heavy" Al chur.g. British gains In India weakened Japanese positions bordering the Mahipur plain. naval guns. Other German broadcasts pre- dicted an Allied drive to take this great port on the Seine estuary. Berlin said "it is admitted that the town of Tilly-Hur-Seulles is not In German narrfs." The town. of Bayeux, has changed Rehearing Denied In Dr. Newton Case AUSTIN, June The stale to- day was denied in the court of criminal appeals Its motion for a rehearing In the case of Dr. Wil- liam R. Newton of Cameron whose conviction of assault to murder Dr. Roy Hunt of Lltllefleld on May 21. 1942. was reversed by the appeals court last March. Dr. Newton had been assessed a seven-year sentence. His wife, also sance units southeast of Stanlsla- wow in Old Poland had been re- buffed. At least eight more strongpolnts were captured by the Red .army yesterday In continued advances along the Isthmus, the Soviet com- mand announced In a communl rnie, while the Red air force In another spurt of heavy bombing attacked enemy airdromes at Brest litovsk, Blalystok, Pinsk. Minsk Bobruisk and Orsha, behind th German lines of the eastern front destroying "many German and setting fuel and EUROPEAN-WAR AT A GLANCE By the Associated Press field dispatches dlscolscd tonight. 'Sid Feder, Associated Press cor- respondent, with the Fifth Army said in a story lilcd from 'Orbclello 1 that the whole mountainous penln sula with tremendous hidden store I of food had come under Allied con- trol. His dispatch follov.'ca an an- puTtiri hand- to-hand fighting and gained con- trol of high ground south of the town, Associated Press Correspond- ent Don .Whltehead reported in a dispatch sent from the Carentan front late Wednesday night. He said the Germans atlacked along the Vire river In an to solll the American bridgehead and Isolate the Cherbourg penlnsuTo from the Allied forces farther east It was the first enemy attack In force In tfiat area. Elite German parachute troops were Riven the job, but failed In Thead on collision with U. Gen Omar K. Bradlcy's doughboys. The over-all balance on the bat fighting at bolh nouncemenl by Allied headquarters ends of 100-mile Allied battleline I ,he iuncncn Of Highways 1 and In Normandy, with British and Ca- duuracc nortn Of Or- nadians holding firm against enemy KJ. alonii coast Of the maln- counter-attacks In the 'Tilly-Caen had aiso been captured. kmnrljianc have rVCH i lie" r The Americans were pressing for- Only figures reported here .last night'were from the. V. M. bank where sales yestcrtiay amounted to with the Es at ,'Si ward and_ engaging a strong force Air Base Sales, Pledges at Abilene Army Air base's bond 1I1C Uefront was still tipped In the A lied favor, with the mlshtcst day llaht aerial onslaught in history 10.000 01 for Troarn. mainland by three causeways, con- tained nearly 300 tons of flour, by U. S. heavy hundreds of cases of ham, rations slr.ele air-armada and biscuits, said Maj. John Paul ever air forces Powhtda. 46. of Philadelphia, rep- hit Europe with more than resenting the Allied military gov- soillcs, with planes from Britain.) eminent, from new French airstrips and from Italy blasting Nazi targets. Brlltsh- quota of for the Fifth War based planes encountered slight and setting dumps afire. While the main Soviet forces still supported by strong airpower and naval bombardment of coas- tal fortlflcallons came to grips with'hastily-summoncd Finnish re- serves, other Red' army units slashed hard at the enemy's flanks. oast the half-way week of. the hands several times. American gains west of Carenlan were described by the Berlin radio "a surprise blow by the first United States army which forded Driver and gained ground In a drive The Americans were said to have "punched two wedges" Into the German lines here alter fighting of "unprecedented violence." Ber- lin said the Americans were receiv- ing reinforcements for a new leap The Germans declared Field Mar- shal Gen. Karl Rudolf Gerd Von Runstedt had switched strong re- serves to engage Gen. Sir Beman L. Montgomery, commanding Allied ground forces, at Cavmont and Vil indicted on the same charge, has not been tried. .fs. Some Berlin broadcasts Inter- preted Increased Allied pressur wound Caen a bid to open th way for Havre. 4 pui-h toward Lt Cities Get Warning On Postwar Plans ST. LOUIS, June without a program for development of air facilities face the prospect of dettriorallon in the postwar years. Mayor J. .Woodall Rodgers of Dallas. Texas', told the Ameri- can Planning and Civic associa- tion's inference on postwar plan- ning today. "Aviation will delermine the fu- ture trade centers of the world and the trend of civilization for genera- tions lo come." Rodgers, in explaining Dallas' master plan which Includes 51 alr- porUs, four to be municipally own- ed, nsierted formation of similar Larry Farmer Case To Jury at Roby RORY, June case of C. L. (Larry) Farmer of Fort Worth. tried here in 104th distr! t court, went to the July I to- night. Verdict had not been reached two hours later. Tho court submitted the charge as misdemeanor, rather than a drive, figures compiled up to and Including the week ending Wednes- day revealed. Boosted by a Series F pur- chase by Sgl. Robert Klemptner of the 2Slst AAF Base Unit, cash sales and pledges rose lo Sales of pledges of 46.800 and new allotments of were reported Wednesday afternoon by Warrant Officer M. L. Kldwell. bond offi- cer. through the office of Col. Harrj Weddington, commanding officer. enemy opposition and total losses were 15 heavy bombers, three med- Alonr with the hunt supplies of food, the Allies selrti a tar- rlson of 26 enemy soldiers. Bagno Reglo, six miles south o taken by the Eighth Army, head- lartcrs announced tonight. Considerable German rearguard turns, and 15 fighters and fighter-1 Orvleto. was captured by the Fiftl bombers; five .enemy planes de- Army and Kami, an Important roa< slroyed. About sorties flown junction 'southwest of was by Italian and Mediterranean based planes against half-dozen oil refin- eries in Hungary and Yugoslavia. In all some tons of bombs dropped on enemy territory In daylight. urmy troops con- tinued their drive through Finnish defenses on the Karelian peninsula and were reported locked In a mighty struggle with fresh Finnish forces 25 miles south of Vilpuri, Fin- lands second city. The Russians said the Finns were suffering ter- losses in men and material. troops advanced pan Orbetcllo on the Italian west osfl 71 miles north of Rome, cut- Girl Accosted by Soldier An ll-ycar-old girl id t'fKd a Camp Berkeley soldier at police ___ headquarters laic Wednesday nlghti nn.f thc 0{ two Importani murder with or without mt''ce. The I who she said accosted her in an Indictment had charged Farmer with the murder, with of W. J. Conner of Breckcnridge Sept. 17. followig a fight with Farmer at a Breckenrldge-North Side, Fort Worth, football game. THree Issues were presented by Judge Owen Thomas to the Jury: negligent which carries a fine of S3.000 or thr years In Jail; aggravated assault. J2.000 fine or two years In jail or simple linatle bat with no i II sentence. The defense and the slate Tester after the sUtc pv on its rebuttal plans in other cities should be the i witnc-vcs. one of whom was the responsibility of public officials. (mother ol the deceased. alley while she was taking a short cut to her home aboul p. m. and her money. The soldier, who answered the description given by the child, was arrested by police officers at North 8th and Pine and turned over to military authorities. :ro charges had been filed late last night. said. The young girl was returning lo her hon-.e alter a visit lo her grand- mother. She -aped from Ihe sol- dier, and a neighbor who witnessed the incident chased Ih man in his car. police raid. The ncienbor. however, was unable to catch tne Eighth Army reported confideriblc Nazi rearguard oppo- sition at Ternl but town's fall be- lieved Imminent. Fifth Army, whtcl took road Junction above Orbetcllo said German opposition weakening De Gaulle in France Wednesday for first tlm in four years as Prime Minlste Churchill clucked House of Com mons quest lorn on recognizing D Gaulle's French National commit tee provisional government o France. De Gnville disclosed t hive mddenly cancelled plans fo sevora' hundred French oflicrrs I land with the first wave as officers. IlAi r more sorties dlrectc upan Ihe whole German wester reinforcement system. Large force of medium and light bombers blast cd the battle area yesterday and 1 500 American Flying FortrcssM Liberators Ins greatest s ngl hombln? force of the war hit stra tcglc behind the Gcrma Incs. The AlIlM have raptured Ger- man airliclos In France, It was dlsrlr.se.1 tmlir. but are not m- then, yet became they were loo hadlT damajtta-by Amen hnmte. The exact number of fields taken not disclosed. Dc-splte the loss of Monlobouw. the Americans were glared by headquarters to be hoMin? flrrnlj onto posltloas on both sides of that Cherbourg peninsular town. Montcbourg. 14 miles southeast of Cherbourg and five miles Inland and Thoarn. seven mile" east 01 Cnen. chanced hands several times In the see-saw erour.d conflict. which still raged Wednesday night. It also was disclosed at hefdqutr- leri lhat number of Germin air- fields In France have been captur- ed, but are not being used.at pre- :nt because of extensive damage y Allied bombing. Greatest weight of planes and ombs came from Britain, where lanes took off on an estimated )0o sorties that rained explosives nd bullets on the enemy In France, Belgium, the Netherlands and Ger- many In bolh tactical and strategic upport of the Invasion ground forc- Simultaneously another estimated sorties were flown from Italy and Mediterranean bases against a half dozen oil refineries in Hungary md Yugoslavia. fn all. about tons of bombs were cast on enemy territory during the day. Over Vessels Aided in Invasion.; WASHINGTON. June 14 Navy Secretary Forrestal reported today that (he United States Naval ta.'k force engaged In the Invasion pf France Included more than warships of all types. In the giant armada, he said, were the Battleships Nevada, Arkansas, and Texas; the Cruisers Augusta, Tuscaloosa, and Qutncy, and "more than 30 destroyers." Despite tho great size of the fleet pounding European shores, he said, the Pnciflc offensive "has not been nnd will not be diminished by our naval effort In Europe." csisUnce was developing at Ternl, ut British forces were making etcrmlned effort to break Into the trateglc communications center on Ighway three. Allied forces now re well within artillery range of Ternl and Its fall was believed Im- minent. On-ieto, another Importani roid unction ndrtheast of Lake Bo'.- ena. also was believed near cap- ure despile some continuing enemy resistance from the west. (Gcrnun fnrcts who for sev- eral had held up Ihe Fifth drive before Orbftdlo presumably were trarptrt by the Hankinfr ihtlr fscipc route (o the north "In the coasUl sector our troops, having encountered In- resistance south of Or- belcllo, developed thtlr strength in the mountain! and Ulc June U c.ut (he road Junction of Highway No. 1 and No. 71." a heidquarlrrs communique s.ild. "Rffonnsl.warire rlrmcnh are moving farther north." -Tl'c enemy Is flshting our bat- tle insltarl of his the Army crmmd headquarters announced. On the northwest of the bridsc- hcad lir.r on the flank of the Am- erican Fourth division. German S e FRANCE. Pf. 2. Col. S Return of Rations For Meat Expected WASHINGTON, June Many point-free cuts of meat are likely to go back under rationing next month, it was indicated to- night. An OPA spokesman said a deci- sion would not be made for another week and that it would r.ot be an- nounced until late this month. Aile Liquor Store Operator Killed The Weather spcctor PaMl L Jordan .'aid occur red alter r.e arrested two men 141 ntffs from here on the Jacksboro; Justice of the Peace Gus Brown returned aft inquest verdict that Seldfn died of gui'jhot wounds at the hand of Jordan, whu declared he- fired three times after the liquor dealer shot once, the bullet graz- ing '.tie Inspector's arm and Inflict- ing a fksh wound in his left fide. Jorcbn said he confiscated 'hree F TEXAS: Pitllr elocdr ruru Into it at a point four Eee ITALY, Z, Cot. S a.s j.nl inJ Frld.T. Wed. Ton. A.M. nllrlr ftoLhtait "1 but was rfl'Msffl to- wa.s .nr. r dsy alter making a statement about j rnVrnirn: the Shooting. Sonitl   

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