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Abilene Reporter News: Monday, June 5, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - June 5, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                 ^ BACK THE ATTACK  Buy More Than Before In Fifth Wor Loan Drive! ^Overall Quota    $3,805,000  Series E Quota    1,255,000  W^t    MDHSING  "WITHOUT OR WITH OFFESSE TO FRIF.SDS OR FOI'.S Wl SKF. ICII YOUR WORLD i;X.\C l l,Y AS II C;0/ S --R-mn  VOL. LXIII, NO. 326  A TEXAS 5WJÜ!, newspaper  ABILENE, TEXAS, MONDAY .\îORN.'NG. JUXE ñ. 1944  EIGHT PAGES  L-m/cd Prrss f L’ rj PRICE FIVE CENTS  Tears, Kisses of Hysterical Citizenry Greet Entrance oi Troops Into Rome  By DANIEL DE LUCE  ROME. Juno 4—i/T’t—Rome, the Eternal City, was Itberated tonight by tanks and Infantry troops «of the Allied Fifth Army which ^ battled Gorman rear-guards to the * edge of the ancient fcrum.  A forcc from the old Anzio beachhead completed ihe mop-up of Naz forces at 9:15 p.m. >2:15 A p.m.. Central War Tlme> by knockint; out an enemy scout car in front of the Bank of Italy, almost withhT the shadow of the column erected to Emperior Trajan. who ruled the Romans from 98 to 117 A. D.  ^ The Fifth Army forcc fouqht Its way into the heart of city after a Xour-ho\ir battle against German armor in the .suburbs of the ancient capital.  In a dawn dash from Borgata Finocchio. 13 miles distant on the Via Casilina. a spearhead of 24 Sherman tanks, eight armored cars and 150 U. S. and Canadian infantrymen pushed beyond suburban Torre Spaccata before they ; ran headlong into a German road block.  ! Old men and young girls and I i toddling children were waving ihe j Americans on when tlie fire of Ger-I man B-milhmeter guns knocked out!  the loading tank and snipers start- 1 i ed pouring machine-gun fire from ' the hideouts next to a white church whose bells were ringing for early mass.  Ail Italian Partisan, who said the Fascist had put out his left eye in torturing him. kissed me 1 on the cheek and vnluiUeered  the information that he was leading an armed band of civilians back into Rome “to kill Germans.”  Smiling, brown-eyed ,?irls brought bouquets of flowers to dust-covered riflemen who were crawling up a sloping field of wild barley and poppies to scout German positions flanking the heavily-mined airport at Centocelle.  A bald clerk, carrying an empty wine flagon, showed soldiers brui.ses on his face and explained that the Germans had beaten him as we walked into the subiu'bs looking for milk for his five children.  "The enemy blew up Rome’s water, gas and electric works yesterday." he said. ••There is nothing to eat. For four months  there lias been no meat, and for two months not a single egg. There is great confusion.  All the big Fascists are fleeing.”  The historic Via Casilina prob- , ably neveV has witnessed a more ' thundeiing military spectacle Mian that of the past 24 hours in which . the onru>hu\g .Mhes broke throuL’h the German hues m the Sacco valley and inio t)ie Green Campagna facing Roine's seven lulls.  Tanks led by l.t. Col. Bo|jiU-diLs , Cairns of Decatur. Ga.. and in- , ianirv units inch’dinu those co:r.-manded by Lt. Coi. Fi'iiKk Izenour of L.O.S Angeles and H. Col. Jo.'Ciih Crawford of Humboldt, Kans.. were m the forefront oi ihe spectacular dnve irom ihe area of , fallen V’aJi!}o3iloiK-.    j  •aiyht ;;;) t):r Via Ca.sDina they | 'Do\\h!i.4 o\cr opposition put; noble 88-nuihmeter armored I ¡'roprllccl u'l;iis. I foimd that ! in'4 up wnh the scout cars; apj. Rov M.mley of Inteina- ' il Palis. Muui . was a fanla.^tic ;  Hall ol Satvirday afternoon !  kerp bunipinc Into lhns.< ed sr!f-proj)c!led stnì".  X siepi lasl nif^ht at Finnorehio near (iermaii horsr-<5r.i\vii train. Tuo bonil'hiEs slrafing by (M-rin.iu tumbled tne off Ibe bcnch tb.il was mv h  The boilies of Ibree * lav l>eside Ihe roa<l «ui w iinlow.  ni.vÌhrd  mni dismounted.  I Mlltd. IX.u (Mantis I jv. and  nde noch!” they obeyed, tanks as if  *.ie Ger.Tian tl . ance stop-had begun, rii killed the  road.  Maj. Ilart.ld Ulodgetl of iJen-tmi, Tev.. sitlliig in the tank • I a e t I e s s l exan, ' beltnv the smoking bilitown of C’ohnina, iipnlngiied yosiortiay because.  A as not touch-  ! ' ':p and ha*?  OI)]V  nade five thous-  .ards in fiv  hn  rrr to thi*c-lt*n (¡■■riii.in trurU v.liith rÌKlU (Mrm.in riflr-  that I sit ’nkn-icnt to lu; abo'jf a •v'r.ite city  ALLIES CAPTURE ROME  Nazis Set Up New Defense  ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, NAPLES, June 4—(AP>—Allied Fiilh Army troops from I the old Anzio beachhead captured historic Rome today after a fierce battle through suburbs of the Eternal City.  The mopup of the heart of Rome—the first ; European capital to fall to Allied troops—was completed at 9:15 p. m. (2:15 p. m.. Central War Time I as an Allied force knocked out the last German rearguard unit in front of the Bank of Italy, almost viithin the shadow of Trajan's column.  Tho'cUy of seven lulls was the fii-st Axis capilal to {:ill to Allied troops wlio werp'TiTirsoing-the ClcTraans* north of Rome with the aid of s^vanns of Allied planes hallerinK ¡it Nazi transport i-oliinins.  ' Shiirtlv aftei- o::;0 p. m. tl series of ci( niolitions inMOc i-i  C'li'rina ,11V. iiu;  ? L. C. Brooks,  " 2 Children Í Are Drowned  KTKRNAL CITY SAVKD—This closeup map of Ronu which. Ihe Allies would have been forced to fight their to new fortifications.  shows the winding streets over vay, had not Ihe Germans retired  HITLER WÂHTS ROME TO BE OPEN CITY i Mil  lied troops had liberated Roinf'— the withdrawal of Clerman troops fn tlie nonhwes! t>f the (it\ ;it:d said the Allies had been ntferrd t plan when-l)y Rnrne wf-uld l)o reopen citv”  UTl fi-oin the Fiu'h-rs in sc\cral d:‘\s. It was asserted the li'.;h! in Hah' would c:>ntinur and that nira.'^nrc-were belnu taken "to fnicc fina! victorv lor Uerinanv and lin .M-lirs.-  '•Tlie vear "f the invasion. iiic  Anulo-.‘\merican high  Th>- proi^osals wore said to have pern acl\anced at II p.ni Satur-d;iy. This WHS le.s.s than 24 hours beinrt Rt>ine changed hands.  Y yarded as ar In the flisl  cominunicjuc de fea  ui. ‘Ulli bripu C. n .tnnihil.ii the most d<'ci,'-i\e ii  The  (ir-vinun th(' City, it was scii(}. Î "to prevent the de-Rome,“ an radio said Firld Kr'ssi'lriMi?  troops from was intend«-slruction Th.e Gern Marshal Gen. Albert M had submitted to the Vatican proposals to make Rome an open city with a request that they hr convoyed to the Allies, but that *sr> far no reply has been received  ii-,ediatel\' iDeuan a campaiKn to tiiinjinj/e tlie ti\U nt Rome. A iyp-K li attitxide was \i)iccd by Karl Piaei:nei-, who i^ajd.  ■ .•\bandonmcnl ol Romo is a con-.‘-iderablf uain Irom a nnlitary pi'int of    All other ('uns)der-  .I'icins ai-)art, supply of the town with n.s nullion inhabitants. to N^huh some 30.000 to 40,000 refu-  ‘ 4—The line shall thei\ run from the western tip of the Vatuan city to Porta San Pancra/io and the Tia.s!(‘\er<- railway staMt>n 'D)e station itsoli is to be outside th«>  ■■Thf German hit'll command    undertakes to keep no mihtarv    iri-i-fallanon.s or ti'oops witliin    t)ie ‘ coniuies of the open cit\-  •'Furthermore the C'lorman Inuh  ' c< tiituand \i:ulertakes to carry    t.m  lit' TifH)p mo\rments m Rome    '  Avenger Grads On Big Missions  ed. would be  IX>GE CITY Kas —The    :\w F'l  command scIukìI here ilie B-26 Marauder w  Hi an annoim<e-the Mara’ic.’er is \rded cpiahli-’d  The Weather  i'.\UTMr;N r k K.x riiFu H  \(r\ heaw strain i>n the German    ilie E  .irm;. Tlie Allied high command    bod  Will now liave to take charge of    pilot.-  the supply of the Roirian popula-    ineiu  tinn."    now I  The German broadcasts ,'^,aid Kes-    airmen as a jdane to be feared only  selrinti's proposals •confirmed roc-    h\ us enemies  (Ignition of Rome as an open city The 2-enuine pilot .sdirKil ':ie;e  anc’ these propcisals read as fol-    revenled that in a .s-i>; jjiotirh ;u-r-lod Its Marauder trainers    car-  • ] —That the bellit’erents recog-    riod their human caruo v.ithi>'i’ a  lu/e Rome as an open city.    smulo fatal a. < iden ' 2 Limit.' of the open city shall b* as fe.llows —f  .a.  -- ■] : V, > - :î  railway line to the north U]> to Piazza MaKEiore. then from ' rVVih    Maimiore followinp the rail-  '■    wav lino and the station Tiburtina  to 'he east of the Villa Chigi.  UM. 1* sal. - ^-The railwav line and Tibur-K<; . XX lina station shall be outside the open city area from Villa Chigi up sK f.« . to the Tiber bend one and a half  h!-nui:h  illinu in tiistances more Uian roui-f! fî'ip.s to t)ie moon I'hafs mor<‘, KirLs ürad'.iatod n the ,\AF trainint; «■ommatKl's ool at Swoetwater, Tex. !ia\o he transition training at Dodße CM^ and some are nruv TOi-ke\iny the B-2f> ou' o\er ti'.p  I'lRST I.IIÜ ÜATM) n :MTM, —lI.M-e is Kniiie. firM liliernl.-d capil.il of Kiir h-ll IS llie i ibi'i. Ill tiir I 11,11 1 Si. .\ii,i!u i iisllc, ill llu- Ikh l%i.’,inur.tl SI. I'rU-\ati<-,iii.  Feeding of Romans Major Job  HEAVY POMB^'RS KEEP UP HAMMEKÍíÍG SÍROÍÍGKOID «««' '"“s  .* tr;e It -ii>dr  ti'-i ■> iti rr-,.r c.uM/.»-  ■ III.- r ' Ml i;i'\--I  tl-. I. n IMI r<* ..f Ki'-îî  .. • M l.. . I.- He proni-- \ ' 1 I f . . I,*. .SCO t iIm ........... of    li  ti.' I. I. ■ . .iitnH -It# .ini' 1- ÌÌI ( . svor, Vrnwn  vobifles. findinu •vxeelb-nt ta tt«*ts oin riincrsled traffit ahe)' the (¡IV lo \ilerh... I.ake lir.i < iano and hake Holsen.i. be.r  General's Mol-her "All Frazzled Out'  OlhlT  We Will Do Does  futui'e iiuiif.''-;s '  WASHINGTON J'U.r Mrs Charles Clnik out" in her own w'-<id^ igcs LONDON. .June 4—T'.-A plane 1'i' I'^r sun to . ;.|inii’ named "We Will Do." -.;ivpn lo the K-,n vrnniTmu .'yoiv - Red armv tiv Reel .Skellnn, Am.ri- The mother ol IJ mll<'' onn movjo and rndio eo?T'.edinn iiaR W. Clark. Fifth Anll^ ourse sunk six Nazi vessels totnlline 2C,.. n. r «• c e n t I. from 500 ton.s duruu’ tlie pa.'t '.eai in Wayno ^'  R \V Ii;.ker i,n Atistin. Situ tJie .o fj-shint’ r.'iinp urn rcseuo tlie tour ],•  See KliOOKS. rate  Red Star Praises Shutt;le Bombers  MOKCOW. .Iiint )  Dr. L. S. Msqee Hamlin, Succumbs  Red Cross Aids On Sharp Upturn  I .liieration . ^ ',:eriod ur.s. the  kilou'.i tcr^ ' r.i'-'.e-tenths of ; sonth southwest of the race of the Torre Dos Quinto, where (he lii'is    run south of the Gulfs of Finiai:d and Ri^a and  Ihe Tiber to Ponte Milvio. which the Baltic sea, the Moscow radio shall be inside the open area. said today.  ase take  my nou.-;^,pe <omplimented hi:;:il'> first American fliei.>- to . Flu.ssian base and de( l;iif-shuttle boinbinK oi (im:.: -will be followed by .1 .-e. *-t<eteica.  The    sp.ijjei    .  lieri a Ion- artifl«* reportjjiy that Die ;j!-' plane to land \\as ' Dudl.”  Wi'.i    n  s;ic FOOD PUOBLEM, Pg. 8, Col. 2 .J   

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