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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 4, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 4, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                BACK THE ATTACK Buy More Than Before l' Ir. Fifth War Loan Drive! Overall Quota Series E Quota Abilene Reporter WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR 1'OKS WJ- SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS JT SUNDAY VOL. LX1H, NO. 352, A TEXAS 3-M, NEWSPAPER ABILENE, TEXAS, SUNDAY MORNING, JUNE 4, 1S44 THIRTY-SIX PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Wiaitd Press Mrj Untied MICE FIVE CENTS Rome's Fall Matter of Hours .Allied Landings .Made on 3 Islands By LEONARD MILL1MAN Associated 1'rcss War Editor American and Australian amphibious troops invaded three iijnore island's off the New Guinea coast Friday, Gen. Douglas MacArthur announced today. All three landings were un- opposed. The three-fold operation, flanking ground action on Biak and New Guinea, was carried out while Japanese armies .were being driven southward in Burma and southwest China, %nd themselves made another big stride in their sweep irough central China. U. S. Sixth Army troops jlashed ashore on Wi and wendi islets, both within ar- llery range of the Japanese ositions on Biak, major is- nd of the Schouten group FOUR JAP TARGETS Soviets Repulse 'German Attacks of lasi LONDON. Sunday, June ttV- German forces fishttng a bloods- battle tor a strategic hill position ..near Stanca, north of last In Ro- Vnanla, brought up reinforcements and attacked incessantly yesterdai for the fifth consecutive day. but were repulsed in every thrust, Mos cow said early today. The broadcast midnight supple- -inent to Ihe Russian communiquf Vleclnred that Soviet troops "bj powerful fire from all types o' arms" checked the enemy and In Jlictcd heavy damage. In the day's savage fighting th Russians "wiped out up to a reel nent of German infantry and burn cd out and disabled 11 enemy tank and self-propelled guns as well a eight armored troop carriers an three armored Moscow slat ed. Continuous air battles wer Bought In lasl area in suppor of the struggle on the ground, th supplement said. Berlin said the hill feature, "en Billing the Germans to overlook I! entire Soviet assembly area." wi captured and heltl despite rcpealc counterattacks, while Mo cow said repented German tank an Infantry assaults had failed to tat. the hill. The Stanca region rises above tl marshland between the rivers Jtp and Prut, and has been bitter for ever since the beginning of the German offensive five days' ago. n Biak older Sixth Army drove Nipponese from nen ground north of Bosnek ic American base. One hun red Japanese suicides were ound after one countefattacl as repulsed. Seven of 1 aiding Japanese planes hot down over Biak. The Australians landing was o iarkar, 35 miles northeast of J.fa ang and offshore from their ac ance up the coast toward b} lasscd enemy garrisons. Only las night Tokyo radio announced L en. Shigeru Katagiri, coinp.iartd r of the garrison, wa Japan's moin industrial centers are fairly con- centrated centering in (out areas: (1) Tokyo-Yokohama; (2) Nogoya; (3) Osaka-Kobe; ad W the northern part of Kyushu Island. Japan has made great effoits to de- centialiie war industries, distributing some among home workers in households; dispersing others into Manchuria and along China coast at Shanghai and other places. Shackelford Turns .Down Beer Again ALBANY. elford county voted neainsl legal- izing the sale of beer Saturday. Four of the 10 county boxes had repirted. with a lota! of 996 votes for legalizing Ihe sale and 1635 agalnsl. The other six boxes will contain only 160 to 175 votes. An election in September voted out legalized beer. killed in acliou Iwo 'months ag That was before the Aussies loo Ihe lown. In one of the most sensa- tional sorties over Japan's Caroline Islands a solitary Lib eralor was credited with In- flicting .509 Japanese casualties In a surprise raid on Woleat '.Truk and Fuluwal were again hil in 'daily Carolines strikes while olher bombers swep elcep into Ihe Dulch Indies. Rocket-firing Allied planes am the "grim courage and detennln lion" of Chinese infanlrymen fo cd Japanese Iroops southward in the battle for the Burma Road, spatches from the Orient said stcrday. Tile first use of flying rocket bat- Ties by fighlcrs and bombers in e Asiatic Ihcater broke up Nip- onese allempts to relieve beleagur- garrisons in North Burma. The rborne bazookas blasted trains and vercraft headed fcr Myitkyina and Pacific Ocean As Allied forces continue their inexorable hop-skip-and-jump progress in the 1'acific, Jap rcss anil radio expresses worry of Tojo and Co., over possible Allied attacks on their lomeland. One reason for Nips' jitters can be seen in map above, which shows how ncniy's main production centers are concentrated in four areas, all within a short bomb- Nazis Dispoil Land, Pillage in Right nv EDWARD KKXNKDY WITH THE FIFTH ARMY I SOUTH OF ROME. June The Germans were in reircal soulh of Rome tonight and the skyline of lhc eternal bv the dome of Si. Peler's slood ou clearlv despite Ihe smoke and dus bailie. The German defenses were crum I bling under Ihe blows of the Fiflh Army and American armor and Ihe enemy fell back, despoiling the countryside nnd pillaging homes In Ills rclrcal. As I advanced with the I troops there still were many Ger- man nockets of resistance behind us nnd they raked the road wilh ma- chine gun and shell fire. These I pockets were being mopped up. German resistance, though fierce I In places, was limited lo delaying slands to cover withdrawal of ma- I jor formations and artillery bat- teries. The Casilian Way -ras llllered wllh wrecked German guns, tanks and trucks anil strewn ivlth the bodies of Germans so recenlly killed llinl Ihry looked like men sleeping by Ihc road- In the countryside belween lhc "E n Opening Salvage Campaign Downtown- COURTHOUSE CONTRIBUTES TWO TONS OF PAPER Nearly two tons of salvage nough paper to make individual ontainers for 2.000 75mm. shells to sent overseas wtre contributed by offices al the county courthouse Saturday. Anyiv trucks picked up the load as a part of the ciiy-wide salvage campaign which began Saturday morning In the, business district, continuing in'-'the, residential sec' lions today. -All counly offices, including those in (lie Taylor counly asri- cullure building, contributed lo tlie campaign. Most of Ihe paper, however, came from surplus slored in the bate- ment from the oflice of the coun- ty clerk. Vivian Fryar, and the counly lax collector and assessor, Pat Patterson. 4 Included- j-yt' chattel.; dated as far back, as 1301 and up to 1930. The mortgages .'must be kept fix years or longer. Ejection inaler- The Weather V. s. OF COMMERCE ivr.vriin.' nrue.Mj Anll.FS'E AND VICINITY Parll cloudy Sunday and Monrfaj. Tin Sundl and Monaajr. stv warm Panhandle and Plains Sundar rmn to occasionally slront wind! FAST clnudy Si and .Mflnday. Not qnlle 10 WAT rxlrcmt norlhivci! pillion Mond.j riesh winds. TEMPr.RATirRES FH. A.M. -t -3 Sal. Yt P.M. M AT Hith and I S! and .11__ and loir M and -J5. it nliMi its niornlnr: SALE OF MILLION DOLLARS IN BONDS GOAL HERE THIS WEEK ogamig. Much Japanese ammunition and qmpmcnl was captured by Aincri- RS inching forward inside Myilk- ,na, while other columns drove on from the north an northeast.. Gen. Joseph W. Slilwell, dim-line Ihe light for lhc Bur- ma road, credited Chinese "cour- age and determination" for gains in mountainous southwest China. They drove into Ihe oul- skirls of one town, pressed to- ward another and repulsed a counterattack al a third, all north of the Burma road in Yunnan province. One column of a three-pronged Japanese drive down Ihe Hankow- Canton railway drove to 35 miles lortheast of Changsha representing a gain of 12 miies. Another was stopped 40 miles to the north. A Lhird successful amphibious land- ing across Lake Tungting was re- ported 80 miles cast cf Changsha A lone American naval pilot dom- inated the Pacific aerial picture with a daring low-level attack on once mighty Tmk. He blew up an ammunition dump, probably sank one ship, left two others in flames, and started fires on two islands. Three air strikes were made In the Kurilrs on the northern ap- proaches to Tokyo. A million dollars in bonds next week is the purchase goal set for Athenians In the pre-Fifth War Loan campaign In preparalion for Ihe formal opening of the drive June. 12. Cily Federated club women Mon- day will open the first of three downtown sales booths and will Join banks and postotfice in Issuing to each purchaser tickets for Ihe Abilene Army Air base show which launch the new drive June 12 at the Paramount theater. purchases of series F, F and O bonds during Ihe pre-drivc wi count toward the county's overall quota of C. M. Caldwell, counly chairman, said yesterday These sales since June I alreadj lolal An addlllona! 000 in short term bonds has been pledged by Ihe Abilene cily com mission. Two steering committees for th Fifth War Loan campaign wer lamed Saturday by Caldwell. Ocorg Barren. Ed Stewart and Rosco Blankenship are assigned to 111 city and Tom and Elmo Cook lo the remainder of the county. The two committees will select sub- commHteemen and allot work lo be clone. 84 Finnish Firms Put on Blacklist WASHINGTON, June 3. United Stales, seeking lo tnrce Fin- land to break Us alliance with Ger- many, tonight blacklisted 8-1 Finnkl firms including twn headed t1 members ol the Helsinki cabinet. Aftpian and Casilian Ways Amcr- Infantry unlls were pushing ahead, racing wllh one another lo lead the chase. German opposition came in spurls ns pockels opened up on advanc- ing tanks with null-lank guns, nnd small nrms fire iinlll wiped oul. 1111 _j One large pocket which delayed I such as ballots nnrl other old American armor for some time fl icords was also included in the WM whm slx bil[ Americans Racing From Iwo Directions By SID F1CDF.R ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Naples, June American troops raced through Uumc's outer approaches from the south and southeast tonight under orders lo destroy the retreating German armies, five of whose IS divisions already have liecu practically annihilated and whose defensive lines have been blasted apart. With the city's skyline in easy view of the advancing American infantry, it appeared that within a mat- l-jr of hours Rome might become the first European capital to lie liberated from the Nazis. Lt Gen Mark W. Clark, commander of the Fifth Army, instructed his subordinates, however, lhat the immediate tusk was to pursue and destroy as much as possible of the erman 10th and 1-Hli armies and that entry into Rome ould come afterwards, The belief grew, hi lat the Allied forces n on a pocket in the n dge of the Sacco valley still icld by the enemy could hope o trap only a relatively small jroportion of the German mils which earlier had been eporled there. Tills was supported by front-line cco'jnls lontght showing that, de- plte Us apparent speed, the Oer- mount. Loose paper was packed Into 38 bales, anil with boxes and bonks of many kinds, was toss- ed Inlo the collection. No figures from Ihi remainder ol he business dis'.rlcl pickup were .vallablc. Capl. Norman Tufrftuilj chief of nlvage al Camp BartelejVIn'charge if the cily campaign, last night iirg- 'd residents to Pllt today's drive iver "with a bang." Sixty Army trucks were to begin terles of artillery were turned on it. The Germans also left many snip ers behind. Some were conccalet in Irees, others in corn fields. The country folk cliccrcd the Americans in the ncvrly lib- .eralcd ttrrilory bill (hey had suffered- Ion much In' recent days to be very happy. Germans had'cnlered (be lar houses and carried out wine, fno furniture .beds nnd even trlnke and had destroyed much of wli pickups at 8 a. m, continuing! they could not carl away, peasan hroughout lown until all districts I i Coast Bombings Continue; Single :ighter Missing are served. Captain Turnbull died thai each :erson must salvage seven pounds of jnper each month if Ihe United States is to fill its quola of 8.0M.OOO Ions of scrap paper. Almost every- one of the 700.000 different Items of material to be packed for going overseas must be wrapped In paper, as explained in iliis week's Lite magazine, he pointed out. Six hundred nilUs are oper- ating In the United Slates to re- process wasle paper, turning U inln pulp for Ihc finished paper board. Urgent need for reprocessed paper is evidenced In the requirement for ,069 square feet of paper to wrap P-5I in parts for shipment ovcr- eas. according to Life, Caplaln sain. "They came in wlih plslols and look everything, even my said one man. "They have been stealing everywhere. There is noth- ing left lo ent In all this country- side." He olfered snldlers a brittle of wine which he said he had hidden from the Germans by burying it .nd. he asked for food. tan rclreal was not a rout. Present dUlances of Ihe Allies rom Home were not disclosed, hut rent dlspalches indicated clearly hat they were short and growing horier. The Americans were thrusting up both the Applan and Caslllnlai ways and across open countrj while other Allied troops converge on routes leading up to Ihe city. The British Eighth Army, which hail pushed up through the I.lrl and Sacco vallcjs, made junction with the Americans i in the Via Cas'lUna 1C nillcs cast of Valmontonc shortly before noon Saturday anil continued foward.i Rome on Dial route. The Berlin radio brocdcasl Ih Rome now was "free of armed for Indicating the possibility Ih le cily might not be defended. Allied hcadQttnrtcrs already h nr.oanccd lhat if the Gcriun riose lo fighhl fnr Rome, tlie All! will be obliged lo lake approprlale illitary measures to eject Ihcm." Tonlgiil the Allied command "These men will te doing a lot of hard, free Caldwell declared, 'and every man and woman should rally around them and help put this drive over Quickly and cheer- fully. "Local issuing agencies are In dead earnest about this and rrport splendid cooperation already from our cillzcns who Indicate they nrc ready to buy early and liberally." First of the clubwoman's Ihree bond booths will be in the lobbv of ing the war under the new- policy ot continuing the blacklist In opera- lion in the poslwar period. The 8< firms nre the first to be placed on the American blacklist. The two cabincl officers invo'.vrf in Ih: blacklisting operation are the foreign minister, Henric Ramsay, and the minister of dcfemc. Gen. [Rudo'. Waldcn. locations soon. Special hond delivery service wil be olfered purchasers who will c.il Ihe boolh, Mrs. Dudley said. No ho ise-lo-housc sales projecl i: planned in Ihls drive. "We arc appealir.s lo Ihe women lo buy nil the bonds they can be fore ihe drive opens." Mrs. Dud sec BONN rmiVK. PR. 15, C'oi. R Solons See No Need :or Manpower Law WASHINGTON, June Chairman Paul V. McNult explain- ed to three dozen legislators todav ihe War Manpower commMon's order pulling industrial hiring un- der control of lhc federal employ- ment scrvive and Democratic lors said aderwnrd Ihey believed the plan would make manpower legis'.allon unnecessary. All male wcrkrrs ouUside agricul- turc will he subjecl lo Ihe Older, effective July I. as a means of re- lieving labor MiorlatEK. Employers will be able to hire male help, ex- cepl for farm Ihe approval of the U. S. Employmrnl Service, and a system of priorities will be set up to channel workers I first Into Ihe mote irnr-crtan'. war Industries. A.I HOLE IN ROAD WITH THE EIGHTH AHMY ON HIGHWAY SIX. llaly, June American came booming down Highway Six In a Jeep shortly before noon to- day, pulled up sharply at A deep hole in the road about 10 miles east ot Valmonton'e and there a more or less .official meeting with the Etghlh and Fifth armies look place. Except for holes blown by Germans, Highway Six now Is oprn from the Elghlh army to Vnimontonc. The American was Warrant Odlcer George Mllra. attached to a U. S. artillery (mil wllh the Frcr.ch units of the Fifth army. He told an Eighth Army rccon- naissance unit which grccUd him that he was from Pcnn. sylvanla and all members as- sumed that was a very import- ant place and didn't inquire what part of Pennsylvania. Mltra sMd he v.-as making a little reconnaissance of his own lonking for transport, but while llicre was plenty of transport In Ibis area his artillery unit was on the wrong side of a hole which the Germans had blown In tlif road al a point where a drain-, a gully. iroarlcasl over Ihe free Italian radio it N.iplcs to Italian. Partisan forces nsldc Rome, declaring "Rome's llb- eralion Is nl hand" anil apprising LONDON. June The ram. arts of under vast new crlnl pressure of shutlle raids by merican planes using Russian lases were blaslcd on the west wlce today by U. S. Fortresses and Liberators wllhoul the loss of a sln- ;le bomber. Both the assaults by U. S. hcavlcu were directed agalnsl Ihe Nazis' In- asion coast of northern France and oul of a lolal force of perhaps bombers and fighters taking part n the double operation, only ens lighter failed to return. The Pas de Calais region also was hit Friday by Fortresses and Liberators without loss. Thus Ihe cost of three attacks' ori HJller's vaunled west wall by'ncsrly 3.000 planes dropping an estimriled tons of explosives has been one slngle-cneincd plane, Tliis means that only one man Is missing from a total of nearly 1G.OCO airmen flying against Pas dc Calais in the lost two an example of the way In which nlr units are paving the way for the landing of ground forces at a minimum loss of life. While the heavy bombers hilling lhc coastal fortifications, hundreds of fighlers and lighter- bornbers of both tlie American and British scclions of Ihe Allied Expe- dilionary Air Force ranged back and forth acrors France and Ihe low hem o! their (inly lo locate minci countries In a series of attacks on (the enemy's transport mid commu- Scc ITAT.V. Fage 15, Col. S nlcalloiu. Berlin Says Rome Free of Troops ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Na- ples. June 3. Its armies ncarlng Rome, the Allied command today placed upon the mili- tary the responsibility for making lhc city a bloody IwllMicld or with- drawing and sparing it further rav- ages of war. and the Germans coun- tered quickly witli a claim thai Rome "can be regarded as a ci'.y Irce Irom armed forces." Issuing a special communique, one day utter Pope Pius cxprc.sscd hope thai Rome "at all costs may be saved from becoming a Iheatcr ol war." the Allied command said the United Nations forro.s "have only t.-iken and will only tnke military action agaln.'.l Rome Insofar as the man concerning the pontiff's plea. Ii -aid: "On 'he German side, everything been done for months to pre- srive Rome from such fate. Roma today can be regarded as A cily cf armed forces." Tlie Allied communique" declared 'lie United Nalions forces to be In- icrcsteri onlv in "the destrucllon and elimination of German forces' in Italy, adding that every pos- sible precaution had been and will be taken "to spare Innocent civil- ians and cultural and religious monuments of permanent value to "Tf the Germans choose to de- fend the communique said, "lhc Allies will bo obliged to take Of rrr.ani me lhc ci'.y, it.1! railways i appropriate military measures to nnd reads for military purposes." eject thtm. II U Ihercforc the sin- Promptly the German propaganda i hope of his majesty's govern- accr.cy Transoccan countered with mcnt and the United Slates gov- whal It raliecl an official statement hy a German foreign office jpokrs- crnmcnt that the enemy will net make llils ill-considered choice." Teletype Operator Causes Erroneous Announcement of invasion NEW YORK, Jar.e W) young British girl telelype operalor employed in Ihe London bureau of kthc Associated Press punched out strip of practice tape tonight and nilhln a matter of moments was re- sponsible for transmission inrough- oul the United States and Latin America of an erroneous aniiounce- i mcnt that the Allies had landed in France. Through almost incredible cir- cumstances, the error slipped through the most elaborate system of safeguards and censorship ever eslabllfhed both by the Associated LPress ar.d Allied authorities. The Eirl. Joan Ellis, had been practicing on a disconnected ma- chine, and in violation of Instruc- tions included In her exercise Ihls urgent n-.cfs.ige: "Flash Eisenhowers hcad- quarters announce Allied land- ings France." At n. m Onlral W" Time, Ihc flash appeared on the direct London printer in New York and was relayed Immci'.iilcly throufihout the United SUtcs and to Latin America. Less than two minutes later came a mess-lee. "Bust trial and word was sent oul al once to editors lo withhold publication.-Al p. m. an- olhrr London message direct- ed lhat Ihe flash be and was done. In Ihe two-minute Interlude be- tween the erroneous flash and the withhold order, however, the'in- correct news had been announced ence alter the word was given over j lands In Prance was transm tied he system. (by a new telelype operator In a n Ciudad Tnijlllo. capital of the j wholly unaulhorized lesl of a mfnlcan Republic, newspaper forator. I Domnca sirens were sounded ar.d crowds "It moved without oathered onlv lo exclaim in dlsap- censors and without ledge fl pWmenl when lhc error was an- nounccd. The error the cditorl.il staff, which had no was caupht quickly such copy on hand. "Experienced operators saw the enough so that It did not appear on lhc printer and Imrnrrli- ator f anywhere in print. notified New York and Ihe editors, who senl a 'kill. "Both editorial ar.d Iralfic staffs were under strict Instrucllons neither to prepare r.or to prartlce with any such kind of copy, agaiml "However, before fransmllllnR lhc firsl 'lake' of the Russian she said she inad- vcrlfnlly ran Ihrrmsh parl "I Ihc tape that shr Ihouuhl she had destroyed. aho'ly n-.cchanical error cc copy as that wrongly milled had througli Ihc guarded editorial and cen- sorship channels The censois are j nol cf.r.ce-rrxt! Iraffic roulir.e iy able to keep lab on "'or curred In ore ot Ihc huv.c.-t operators it hid bcon Tlie tclc'.ypc system ope rates a roll of narrow paper Upe in which holes are punched as the operator manipulates a keyboard. When the tape is then nm through In New York and elsewhere newspaper and radio slalion switch boards were almost In- sUnlly swamped inquiries from persons who had heard the orizlnal and Incorrect flash but not Ihe "kill." The London bureau ol Ihe Asso- of Ihe evening, which lhc- ioarfn'r cemcrMiip also is taking j iintod CftllT c her l the prc- she did not i a transmitting machine, of Ihrsc series of holes ranges a riif- 22 and has been which since Jan- '-hc l'nntcr- atjr-c: rccciv- (he possibility of precisely such incident "Joan F.llis. Ihe ynunt optra- lor who erred, said she had been disconnected over many ndlo stations in Amer- cialed Press cabled this explana- praclicin? on a lea and at some baseball parks, lion: lea and at some baseball p: In New York's Polo Grounds the crowd observed one minute ol sl- flash erroneously slating Eisenhower had announced Allied lorn up all lhat lape and thrown It The American radio chains, NBC, CRS, Blue Xel- work and Mutual, all Inter- rupted programs (o carry Ihe erroneous flash, and again (o announce the ccrrtcUon, vthlch they repealed al Intervals dur- inf lhc cvcnlnf. By coincidence Ihe British Company at the time re- Ihe direct facilities anil fully and j individually Intruded to snxl only malerial passed by Die censor and so stamped. Each operate, has signed i secrecy form affirmir.g he or she understood his lull respon- sibility. "In ihis instance, however, no The ecnvori In London work from Ihc lyped copy prepared hy reporlers and edilors, nol frnm telelype perforator tape. did had In "this.almost 'unheard ot imtance. anyone limed In on its Program for the tape, with its codc-lftc the impression might easily have of except I by the highly-cxperier.ced to be been gained that Invasion was In progress. Sine. In Ihl, there was [run through a transmitting ma-i Tr.e radio chine hours or even days alter It! evening broadcast tactual ac- 1 count of error, no 'copy.' they did not know about the erroneous until rlwas nctually perforated.   

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