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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: June 1, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - June 1, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                BOND BOX SCORE Pearl Harbor May Quota May Sales VOL. LXIII, NO. 349 A TEXAS Abilene EVENING 'WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD .EXACTLY AS IT NEWSPAPER FINAL YANKS THROUG ABILENE, TEXAS, THURSDAY EVENING, JUNE 1, PAGES Associated Press (AP) United Press PRICE FIVE CENTS ELINE ysSfimson fMediums and fighters Hit Daylight Lick LONDON, June In simultaneous overnight as- ijiults, powerful forces of RAF bombers hammered Nazi de- fense installations along the French channel coast and fanned out over a 200-mile f front in France to blast three Tf the largest railroad centers through which the. Germans are shuttling their .forces to meet the impending Allied invasion. Strong formations of medium bombers and fighters were ob- served crossing the channel late today in the direction of Bou- logne and Dieppe on the French invasion coast. Murky weather t prevailed over the English chan- nel during the morning, and the big bombers stayed at home, In the rail center attacks last night some 500 RAF night bomb- ers smashed the Trappes yards 16 iiiles outside Paris, Tergnier 75 miles northeast of Paris and Sau- mur 150 miles southwest of Paris. Eight British planes failed to re- turn from the- operations, which .included mine laying in enemy wa- rPsrs, the Air ministry announced. Probably well over tons of bombs were dropped in the night attacks. By The Associated Press Japan's great China offensive to- Halifaxes anci Wellingtons, of the day appeared on the" verge of ex- Mediterranean Allied air force Pension into a four-front battle EAF PLANES ATTACK ENEMY SHIP WITH armed enemy trawler is at- tacked with rockets by Bcaufighter planes of the RAF Coastal Commando. Rocket at right (circled) had just left the plane while that at left (circled) and another in the center are approaching the target. This is a British Official photo. (AP Japs Mass Against bombed railroad tow ti'apks by the Danube river's Iron Gate canal on the Romania-Yugoslavia border last night. After, a one-nijrht interval the Germans again sent some planes against England. These raiders droned over East Ang- Ha and dropped a few bombs, but they appeared to be main- ly "on the snoop." It was of- jf ficially reported that no one was hurt by the German foray and only slight damage was caused. The Air ministry's report on the French coast bombardment said oimply that a "number of military objectives were This operation began just before mid- night and was crammed into 15 minutes, with relays of bombers passing each other going and com- "Hell let an English observer said. In daylight raids yesterday pow- erful forces totaling possibly Allied planes struck from the west and south, bombarding the four Ierman rail centers of Hamm, snabruck, Schwene and -Soest and the Nazi oil source at Ploesti In Romania. The attacks from British bases against the transporta- tion hubs saw from 750 to Sec AIR WAR, Pg. 2, Col. 2 ases in i aimed at wiping cut new Allied air bases now virtually dviftinatins enemy shipping along the Chinese coast. From Chungking unofficial reports said the Japanese were massing in Indo-China, pos- sibly for a drive on Kunming, XI. S. air base on the Burma road. From Honan province came news indicating the in- vaders were gathering for a new offensive, perhaps against The Japanese now are moving south and west out or north-central Chungking. Area labor Dropped Report From Lists WASHINGTON, June The War Manpower commission today dropped from its labor market Classification 35 areas in groups 3 4. These are the areas, the agency said, "in which there is and has been for many months a sur- plus ol labor and in which there is very little war production activity." Group 3 includes areas in which Alight labor reserves will remain after six months. Group 4 includes areas were sub- stantial labor reserves are expected to exist after six months. Texas areas dropped from Group 4 include: Abilene, Laredo, San An- clo, and Wichita Falls. Areas dropped from group 4 in- clude: Lubbock and Tyler. k Beginning Today The Reporter-News Circulation Office will close at p. m. Subscribers who miss their evening edition are asked to please calf before that time. The telephone number is 7271 Bulgaria 'Lines Up With Hitler' LONDON, June Mos- cow radio said today it was becom- ing "obvious that Bulgarian rulers have resolved to throw caution to the winds and plunge neck and crop into ventures dictated by Hitler." The broadcast, recorded here by the Soviet monitor, continued: "It remains to be seen wheth- er the Bulgarian people will find the strength to upset this crim- inal venture. One thing though is clear, and that is that the Bulgarian rulers arc playing with fire. Well, he who sows the wind reaps the whirlwind." Bulgaria is at war with the Uni- ted States and Britain but not with Russia. There have been repeated indications in the last few days that Bulgaria has been faced with the choice of stopping aid to Hitler or sacrificing her long-strained friend- ship with Russia. China. The drive on Changsha has in five days moved 60 >miles, with less, than 40 to go. Capture of Chan- gsha, key point on ,the Hankow- Canton railroad, would help block off southeast China from Allied use. Chungking authorities said civil- ian evacuation had been completed in preparation for the fourth Chi- nese defense of the city. The second offensive, west along the Yellow river in Ho- nan, apparently was in tem- porary .deadlock, with Chinese forces attacking in some places. Airpower forged uy Maj. Gen. Claire L. Chennault was the only weapon in which the poorly-equip- ped Chinese had an edge. Associated Press War Correspondent Clyde A. Farnsworth visited the new Chi- nese-American Composite wing in Honan and reported this small air group already had thrown a wrench into Japanese plans. He said P-40s and B-25s had knocked out much motorized trans- port and had gained complete air superiority between the Yellow and Yangtze rivers. Farnsworth threw significant light on Japan's willingness to mount its current offensives: "Eastern China bases from which "the 14th airforcc and its tactical appendage, CACW, has been virtually controlling the enemy's shipping, will be of prime importance in the fulfillment of Adm. Chester W. Nimitz' pledge of driving through to China." In Burma Chinese-American troops pushed down the Mogaung valley, capturing the enemy strong- point at Malakawng. There was no new report of the fighting at Myit- kyina, besieged by Lt. Gen, Joseph Stilwell's forces. LONDON, June i._ Large scale German attacks on Russian lines north of lasi in Romania cost the Nazis "thousands of dead yes- terday without advancing their lines "a single Moscow said today. A broadcast Soviet communique declared the Nazis, using tanks and infantry, made incessant assaults WASHINGTON, June of War Stim- son said today that with Army troops already overseas, the deployment of air and service forces is prac- tically completed "and the period of decisive action is at hand." The bulk of forces now mov- ing out of the United States to combat areas is composed of ground troops prepared to use the bases and take advantage of the preliminary air assaults for the final blows against the enemy, the secretary told a news conference, adding: "The United States Army today has soldiers deployed out- side the continental United States in theaters of operation through- out the world, striking and prepar- ing to strike victory-winning blows by land, from the sea and in the air against Germany and Japan. "This force, at the end of supply lines stretching more than miles and reaching into every con- tinent, represents approximately 47 army. "By the end of the num- ber of troops overseas will be increased to more than men, approximately two-thirds of total strength." Overseas deployment of necessity came first for the supply and air forces, Stimson noted, since it was necessary to build up the bases for the eventual main drives against the enemy. Those bases are now es- tablished, he said, and shipping is available for the movement of ground forces to the overseas the- aters. This movement "rapidly is nearing the peak." Stimson said that the overseas strength of the army exceeds the peak overseas strength in the World war.by men, and is only on the Soviet JineaV but men short of the total Board to Meet A meeting of the Sunshine Nurs- ery board has been called for Fri- da'y afternoon at 4 o'clock at the nursery, 702 Locust. Mr.s. D. D. Parramore. president, will conduct the meeting. The Weather OPA Delays Decision On Crude Price Hike blows by Red ir.fantry, artillery and tanks stalled all efforts to push beyond the "insignificant wedge" achieved the day before. The Russians said they had knocked out 122 German tanks and shot down 164 enemy planes in the first two days of the bat- first sizable break in a ..six weeks lull on the long east- ern land front. Berlin reports said the aim of the attacks was to improve German-Ro- manian positions. Only minor action was reported on other 'sectors of the front by the Russians. The Berlin radio said action in the lasi sector wa.s accompanied by a great air battle in which 87 Soviet planes were downed. McEachern Breaks From N. M. Prison SANTA FE, N. M., June Two life-term convicts who escaped from the New Mexico state peni- tentiary, held up a taxicab driver and look his car late yesterday were the object of a widespread hunt to- and a ay; John B. McManus olicrcd a reward for each man, dead or alive. Assistant State Police Chief A. B. Martinez named the cscapeces as James Ernest, Ray, 24. sentenced for strength of the Army at the close of the World War L Stimson said thc au forces, with a total strength of approximately has slightly less than half of that personnel already overseas. The AAF has more than air- j planes, including combat planes, he said, ind more than one- half of the combat plane strength is overseas, "making the AAF the world's most .formidable aerial striking force in point of size and fire power." 15 Divisions Massed In Africa Say Nazis t LONDON, June Ber- lin radio said 15 Allied divisions, five of them tank, were concen- trated in French North Africa for an attack on southern France. The official DNB dispatch said the 10 infantry and five tank di- visions will enter thc battle scene in conjunction with Gen. Eisen- hower's Invasion of the west coast of Europe. The troops were said to and Algerian prison Superintendent includc Moroccan i units. The report said it was possible that the Allied command would turn the liberated French island of Corsica, which lies within 103 miles murder, and Robert A-leEachern, 23, convicted under the habitual crimi- nal law. McEachern, McManus said, had capcd three times from Texas penitentiaries. of continental France, into a grand style invasion springboard. The Germans speculated that the Ita- lian Riviera might also be an in- vasion objective. Customers Increase The Abilene water department gained 59 customers during May, rrosinone in By KENNETH L. DIXON BEHIND GERMAN LINES SOUTH OP ROME, May bunch of" American fighting men staged one of the most I accompanied the troops in their; circuitous 15-mile crawling, scram- bling and hiding hike. They accomplished their feat by slipping past German machine-gun spectacular infantry coups of the positions- so close bright tracers fired war last night and early this morn- j toward our side of the front flash- ing by establishing themselves on i ed over our heads as we crawled a high razorback ridge on Montej along. Artemision, over- looking Velletri. They moved in ghostlike stealth by the hundreds through bright moonlight and in- filtrated German lines and reserve positions. At dawn today they were in po- sitions overlook- ing Velletri, which I still is contested. L DIXON (Germans retreated from Velletri today.) Between these Alban hills and Velletrin, an unknown number of Germans are caught in a slowly closing trap, completely surprised because the GFs came all the way without firing a single shot. Our position overlooks Rome to the north and Velletri to the south. They "eliminated without noise" the few German outposts and sen- tries which they could not by-pass. By crawling and crouching along a snakelike course through vineyards and forests and up almost perpen- dicular slopes, they took advantage of every possible cover. The closest calls came when the Germans staged a front line air raid while we still were in no-man's land. Flares wereA dropped, illuminating: the whole" countryside and their deadly brilliance forced us to lie mo- tionless for minutes which seemed like hours. Barking dogs and braying jackasses also threatened to betray our creep- ing progress. The whole venture was like the Hollywood conception of war. It had never been done by so many before on this front. 36th, 45th Vets ck From Italy By WENDELL BEDICHEK Reporter-News Managing Editor _ TEMPLE, June lighted up, quick questions were asked about Abilene friends and sincere expressions of joy at being back in Texas were heard this morning as 65 men wounded in Italy reached McCloskey General hospital. Most of the jrroup were members of the 36th and 45th divisions. Among the first off the train, and on their way to breakfast were three boys who were mobilized with the 45th at Fort Sill late in 1940 and served in the division until wounded. Sgt. Albert Sexton, 25, of Pichcr, Okla.. a 179th infantry boy; Pvt. Ben Fillmorc-of- Ada, Okla., from the 180th and Pvt. F. F. Elvin of Santa Fe, N. M.. quickly recalled-a message sent from Abilene to the 45th after its brilliant success in Sicily. "We appreciate said Sexton. "It was our second declared Fillmore, in fact, it was more like home than any other place where we were trained." Sexton was wounded in the right arm as the whole 5th army front moved with hill 609 near Venefro as a main objective. He was put out of action Feb. 2.9. Pvt. George A. Fox Jr. of Olden, brother of Mrs. Melvin Holt, 730 Cypress, Abilene, was on today's train. He was hit Dec. 14 at Vene- fro, suffering 32 different wounds, one of which caused loss of his Housing Outlook Judged Critical The housing situation in Abilene is "extremely critical." Colonel Vic- tor W. B. Wales, commander of Camp Barkeley, told a special hous- ing committee of the Abilene cham- ber of commerce this morning. It affects not only military per- sonnel, but civilian employes of sprawling Camp. Barkeley and the Abilene Army Air base. It also af- fects persons classified as essential war workers and just plain civil- ians. The army housing unit main- tained at the chamber of com- merce under direction of Lt. W. W. McKccvcr gets an average of 75 applications daily for houses and apartments. It docs not handle civilian applications at all, only military. To fill the 75 daily demands for housing, the unit has an average of one vacant apartment and one va- cant house per day. Lack of housing facilities is ham- pering the army's program of eas- ing civilians into army jobs here- tofore filled by uniformed person- nel. Two thousand five hundred mili- tary families, most of them with Optometrists Elect AUSTIN. June W. A. j one more than the 58 gain in April. J young babies, are living in shacks Pettey of Lubbock was re-elected i During May 206 customers regis- in and around the city. AS many as president of the Texas Optometric i tentf, 147 checked out and all but fifty persons are using a single toil- Association, Inc., at a concluding 59 were moving from one address I et; Many have no bathing facilities convention session here. _ right hand. A shell struck "under him" a.s he put it, during a bombardment from the air and by heavy artillery of a landing field. Originally in the Ranger National Guard 'company, he had been in the 36th MPS since stationed at Camp Blanding, Fla, His wife and mother live at Olden'. Another reunion this morning was of two 45th division officers Harold Reynolds, whose wife is the former Eloisc Cook of Wingate, and Lt. Quintus. T. Hcrmlon, Idabcl, Okla. Rey- nolds arrived here several weeks ago and had just returned from a furlough visit with his xvifc. They were married while the 45th was at Camp Barkeley. A former pupil in Abilene's Lamar school, 1st. Lt. Tom Shaw of Dal- las, came back to Texas today, too. He was severely wounded by a hand grenade at Feb. 5 as a hill south of the monastery was being attacked. He is a son of Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Shaw and his father was with Lone Star Gas Co. ALLIED H E A D Q U AR- TERSr Naples, June armored units have smashed three and one- half miles north of Velletri to the northernmost slopes of the Alban hills, breaching the last major German defense line below Rome which is in plain sight, it was revealed today. A terse headquarters an- nouncement reported hard figrhting: along: the Velletri- Valmontone line astride the ap- proaches to Rome, which field dispatches said the Americans had breached m a plunge deep into the Alban hills fortifica- tions. West of the most bitterly con- tested section of the Nazi defense line, the Fifth army had driven armored spearheads within 13 miles of Rome. The advances were won against the strongest kind of German resistance, a com- munique said today. The Allied command was silent on Velletri itself, but German ra- dio reports indicated the shell and WASHINGTON, June of War Henry L. Stimson announced today that casualties were suffered by American forces in Italy from the time of their landing- there last September to May 27, 16 fjays after the current drive staiWed. Casualties include 686 killed; wounded, and 8.554 missing. bomb-battered town had been left to the Americans after hot street fighting. The Eighth army meanwhile, advancing steadily up Highway fi, the Via Casilina, captured Frosinone, provincial 5-t miles by road from Rome. Frosinone is the most import- ant town and communications center yet seized in the drive nlong; Highway 6. It .fell to British infantry and armor af- ter a sharp battle. Other American elements plung- ing forward in the vicinity of the Alpian Way captured dominant high ground near the lake of Nemi northwest of Velletri. m The Fifth army gains from Val- montone to the Tyrrhenian coast were officially called "limited but important." Three miles west of the forti- fied town of Lanuvio armored units crossed the Fossa di Campoleone. a drainage canal, and maintained, steady pressure on the enemy in that area interlaced with canals--'" and ditches. British troops nearer the coast advanced astride a road north Ardea, but the extent of their gains was not disclosed. They encoun- tered strong machincgun and ar- tillery fire. Nazi Field Marshal Albert Kcssclrin.sr continued to in- crease his defensive forces in the Valmontonc area to keep Highway 6 open for German remnants fleeing from the low- er battle sectors. .It was of- ficially announced that the Al- lies made some grains in that area despite the stubborn re- sistance. "French troops are maintaining contact with German rearguard de- tachments falling back toward Valmontone and Avezzano, where in Abilene when he was about 10 it. is deemed almost certain that a years old. He was practicing law in i defensive stand will be an Dallas before going into service. to another, records showed. WASHINGTON. June Action on price increases sought j by West Texas and eastern New 1 Mexico operators on Permian Basin i crude oils will be deferred by the Office of Price administration for at least 60 to 90 days pending study j of means of boosting the move- ment of out out of the area. This was reported today by gressmen from that area who called OPA oil division officials to the whatever. In some six-room houses, as many a.s five families are using j a single kitchen and a single bath- DALLAS, June much as 17 ccnts a barrcl Thc i complaint 'iled acainst Thr as makinS Public the aftcr petition was filed weeks ago with ulcd against The Dallas statcmcnt of policy adoptcd bv thc moon. OPA. iNCws for publication of a want ad i committee. Capitol t.o discuss the operators' I Rcosevelfs Committee on Fair Em- ABILENE cloudy this petition for price increases of as ployment Practices has dismissed a afternoon, tonight and Fridsy morning; considerable cloudiness Friday noon. EAST this aftci tonight and Friday morning: consider- able cloudiness Friday afternoon. j WEST cloudi- ness this afternoon, tonight and Fri- day, a few scattered thunderstorms in the Panhandle and South Plains. Maximum temperature last 24 hours. _ -ast 12 hours Question should await the finding i Bering the Dallas case yesterday, M.nimtim temperature ,ast ,2 hours., ------------______ 0 ri t Ui from Washington to the news- paper said. Malcolm Ross, chairman of FEPC. All these facus and others were brought out at this morning's com- Scc HOUSING, Pg. 2, Col. 3 Vet-s Saved From Wrecked Ship Rep. Mahon one of those participating in the confer- ence, said the OPA officials con- tended that settlement of the price in which it was specified that a negro man was wanted for a job to be filled. The FEPC in Washington, con- TEMPERATURES Thu-Wed Wed-Tuc A.M. Hour P.M. of of moving surplus produc- tion in the Permian Basin to mar- kets. Their conclusion. Mahon ir.iormed the newspaper last nipht of its dismissal after deciding that Leonard M. Brin. regional FEPC s2 said> was that the pricc a.ucstion! director at Dallas, acted without 86 85 should be put aside for 60 to 90! authority in citing thc News for R4 days. publishing the ad. Mahon said SAN FRANCISCO. June Thc sea today was pounding the Liberty ship Henry Bergh to pieces on thc rocks of Farralon islands. 30 miles west of the Golden Gate, but j her more than Navy passengers An editorial in the News .stated in i wore safe. The 10.500 ton vessel ran ashore in fop: and rain at dawn vcstcrtiav part today: "XXX The following i.s thc Sunrise thi the OPA men ex- 83 pressed hope that the new 16-inch 79 j pipeline from West Texas to Okla- 75; homa, now moving about barrels daily, could be stopped by the addition of pumper stations Sunset tonight i a barrel capacity. The FHPC ruled that news- papers cannot be classed as war industries and that the execu- tive ordrr sc-ttinsr up the FEPC specifically linntec the juris- diction of thn committee to war industries, a special dispatch that, the News raiseci on behalf of itself and its employees only as thc-y represent thousands of other in- dustries and tens of thousands of employees of the city: Docs thc FEPC have thc authority to break down the traditional southern seg- regation of races in private indus- try when state laws hax-e been up- held by the United States supreme court establishing segregation in the public services? If .so, bv what while bringing the .sailors home from war service in the South Pa- official announcement said. Infantry Tears Gap at Velletri By EDWARD KENNEDY WITH THE FIFTH ARMY SOUTH OF ROME, June American infantry has broken into the Germans' Velletri-Valmontone line and occupied strategic high points in the Alban hills northeast and northwest of Velletri. Thc infantrymen opened a pap in thc line cast of Vcllctri and fought their way yards ahead and occupied a point on Mount Peschio ridjre, one of thc highest points in thc Alban hill. Additional elements moved up and consolidated positions on these JN PATH OF aged dominating heights while other U. Italian woman who fled the s- occupied high ground Mist Over Strait battle zone around IMinttirno and returned when Allies; ousted thc Germans gnaws at; of white lake Ncm1' This later brought the Fifth army to IS airline miles from Rome's ?ate of St, John UM, i j i Through which the today, with a ceiling of very low supplied by thc Allied Mih-j Appjan Way enters the capital. clouds and extremely poor visibil- i tary Government organiza-; From the newly won heights the Light. variable southwestern tion. This photo was taken by doughboys got their first glimpses AP Staff Photographer Henry of Kome-a hazy mass of buildinss authorivy? Its existence is due sole- winds ruffled the sea and kept the 1" in the distance frora the midst-of iy to executive- ordor. it is without fempfrature down. The 9 a. m. lj- war pool camera- which rose the dome of St. Peters, reading 55 decrees fahren'neii. 'man. (AP its lines just barely visible.   

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