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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: May 26, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 26, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                BOND BOX SCORE fmcc Pearl Harbor May Quota May MORJING WITHOUT OR OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Associated Prat LXIII, NO. 343 A TEXAS NIWSPAMR ABILENE, TEXAS FRIDAY MORNING, MAY 26. 1044 -TWENTY PAGES United Preu (Vf.i PRICE FIVE CENTS PHILIPPINE BARRIERS T'hese are Ihc. island barriers which (he U. S. must overcome on the way to the Philippines. Yap, a pinpoint of four vol- canic islets, 18 miles long and %ight wide, has less than 30 square miles of dry laVid area. Palau, western Jap bastion of Ihe Carolines, is 270 miles southwest of Yap. A cluster of the Palau group is 550 mites east of the Philip- pines and 560 miles north oi the western tip of New Gui- nea. Farther westward lie the Netherlands East Indies. PALAU ISLANDS N In Italy Gathers Power i i rn L 11 I PV i II If" 1 IN NAZI TRANSPORTATION HPeds Act to Aid BY TONS OF BOMBS ?ritonsHfin Japanese Camps LONDON, May (AP) -Move than Allied planes attacked German airdromes and transportation centers on the continent with over tons of bombs today in a crush- ing two-way assault during which American Fortresses and HRH ARMY, BEACHHEAD UNIT MERGE BELOW ROME ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Naples, May Americans of the Anzio beachhead forces joined with Amer- Scans of the main Fifth Army front in a dramatic, long- LONDON Mav awaited meeting in the Ponline marshes below Rome today The Soviet Ui.ion has made after 14 days of a whirlwind offensive that had cracked the HoJidUll UUIJ1IK VYIIH.II J.JIU OU V Jv I i_nuun IJQJ w Liberators, storming the west wall, ran into an unprecedented to Japan on [back of the German defenses in Italy concentration of exploding rockels thrown up by suddenly- behalf of British war increased ground defenses. At least 21 rail centers and 15 air fields upon which many has been leaning heav- I W ily for defense of Fortress VU Europe were pounded in this seventh day of furious pre- invasion air onslaught, a day in which the attacks ranged from Toulon in southern France to the German capital itself. From 150 to 1.000 American heavies-based In Britain slammed explosives on lour air fields, nine Situation Good, Less Vegetables ers, Foreign Secretary An- thony Eden revealed in Com- mons today. Eden said he requested Russia to approach the Japanese nnd while the Sovlcl replied that these mat- ters usually were left to the pro- tecting power Rus. sin had agreed to Intercede. The Eden Outlines ,5-Point Plan LONDON, May five- 1U IV Illlvn-vvl... 1 lAJ.luvyn, I11OJ "-V- foreleii said the point blueprint for points on which satisfaction world organization, three _____ was wanted were: freight targets yards and other military in northeastern France Wake Islands lashed Americans; Defenses Weak J5 More Vessels By LEONARD MILL1MAN Associated Press War Editor American carrier forces lashed almost unopposed at gMarcus and Wake islands, on the central Pacific seaway to Tokyo, while United Slates submarines sank 15 more Jap- 'anese ships in enemy waters, the Navy announced yester- day. Only two Nipponese planes were teen in the two day strike at Mar- cus last Friday and Saturday. One was shot down and the other on the ground. Marcus, miles southeast of Tokyo, is supposed to be an air base and aerial reconnaissance post. Similarly -weak' opposilion was encountered Tuesday nt oft-bomb- mfd Wake, but that was expected. Only four American planes nnd three airmen were lost In the two pronged stride. Japanese buildings and Installations were left shat- MCE. FINDS OFFICER KILLED WIFE, THEN SELF and Belgium, another American daylight fleet from Italy attached the Mediterranean port of Toulon and the rail center of Lyons, 200 miles farther north, the funnel to the southeastern French defense zone. A U. S. Strategic- Air Forces com- munique reported that nine enemy aircraft were destroyed in the 'sweep against the west wall, .against a loss of four American bombers and 12 fighters. I There was no fighter opposition to this assault, the American planes going down before the strong sntl- I aircraft fire and a spectacular rock et defense. The Luftwaffe, frayed from cop ing with Wednesday simultaneous a post-war Slates i. The right of the protecting Russia, the British power and the international Red and pooling military Cross to visit the camps. power in a police force to keep th WASHINGTON, May 2 A complete llsl of British peace, was presented to Commons The Office of War Information pie- prisoners and internees and list today by Foreign Secretary An- Jicted tonight that the nation's food thosc tt.no havl, AM Eden, situation "should remain good for 3 should I Eden said conversations with the _ -i ijiai. tile juutuLUDi: tjuuuiu i i-An-i. ...aiu Ihe next several months" but Dial lo rccclv.e Rcd Cross sup- olher powers already was underway the civilian supply of canned vege- u t b shlp5 nnd to and would progress even in the lables during tlic year starling July them hcat o[ cltmacllc battles. He dls- i would be "the shortest in years." Prime Minister Church- Ill did intention to on others in detail our but offered these as Bri- tain's principles: The world organization must be designed to prevent a re- currence of aggression by Germany ar.d Japan and must be fully equip- ped with force lo meet tills pur The OWI report, analyzing the I cort ouilook for the 1944-45 farm gave this summing-up: '-'We will probably have ralionlng on ono ypo of food or another, off and on, until Ihe war is won." The present ration-free status of most meats should prevail for several months, OWI said, but the choicer cuts and grades of beef, j_ pork, veal and lamb may be more scarce later in the year. ,12, Dies Here Horn Sr., 72, well known To insure West Texas building contractor, died ....._. __ urnrtrifk Mpmorial hosoital I collaboration "Our supplies of fresh vegetables Heudnck Memorial nospiim the B and fruits are adequate, us well as Thursday at p. m. following an Commmm.c3llh ttnd china.. those of milk.-eggs, poultry, two weeks. in any' this, there must be close political and military between the United Brit Tank supported United Itates infantrymen crumpled Jerman positions at the heart of Cisterna, enemy stronghold on the Appian way, and were battling to wipe out the last sniper nests there athwart tha road to Rome. Lt. Eugene Ba- con of Danville, 111., forecast, that all the Germans left in the city would be dead or cap- lured within a few hours. Tonight the united Fifth Army forces closed In along a 60-mile (lank of the hard-pressed German armies, which had relinquished the ntlre west coastal area of Italy ulhward from the Molletta river, ily a score or miles below Rome. Allied warplancs were pounding le retreating Germans ceascless- taking a terrific toll of men and material. The battle of the beachhead, had raged intermittently or four months, and the battle ot he Hitler line, which only few days, were finished, and tha Inal, decisive battle for Rome and he extermination of Ihe Germans n Italy appeared to be already be- ginning. i armada of 500 heavy bombers, did -not risk their air force to defend Ihe targets, but augmented anti-aircraft batteries 1 throughout the occupied lands threw up a terrific barrage of flak, including green and black fields ot [exploding rockets. No reports were available as yet First Lt. Donald K. Bush shot his wife to death and killed force on soulhern France, during himself with a pistol Wednesday afternoon at the home of L.hichi Liberator crewmen reported, her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Brooks, 542 Highland, Justice me carnoules yards 15 miles north- of the Peace W. J. Cunningham found after he had held a court of inquiry into their deaths. ply." The Abilene Flier tered and in flames, thlp was sunk. One enemy When and If MarciK anil AVake are knocked out atrial reconnaissance posts, as was indicated by the two- edged strike, the American fleet will be free to roam the northwestern Pacific up to Japan's Inner defense line without detection. Submarines, which regularly pen etrate all enemy defense lines, sank .a destroyer, four transports, three and seven freighters in their latest toll. They have def- initely sunk 41 Japanese ships this month and 513 since the start of the war. More than 150 others have been damaged and perhaps U. S. Sixth Army Infantrymen, supported by tanks, artillery and Australian-flown Kittyhawks, drove to the edge oi the partially com- pleted Japanese Maffin airdrome western New Guinea, Gen. t Douglas Mac Arthur announced to- day. When taken it will be the ninth New Guinea airfield captur- ed since the landings April-22 at Hollandla and Allape on A Sec PACIFIC, rage 3, Col. 2 Second Lt. Oran M. Richardson. 54. co-pilot of a B-17 stationed In England, has been misslne in ac- tion over Germany since May 12. his 'parents, the 'Rev. and Mrs. M. F. Richardson. 2445 Anson Road. were Informed late yesterday by the War department. Overseas since visiting his par- ents late in March. Lieutenant Richardson recently wrote he had been cltrd for the Air Medal. He also had described some of his raids, saying they got back one time with 100 holes in their ship. Lieutenant Richardson, graduate of Abilene high school and Har- The finding was based, said Cun- ningham, upon sworn testimony of Mr. and Mrs. Brooks taken in the court of inquiry yesterday after- noon in the office of Dan Abuott, acting county attorney. Cunningham said: The acl was committed while I Lieutenant Bush was under severe nerve strain and near nervous breakdown and his nervous condi- tion had existed since his return from 15 months of overseas sen-Ice, (mostly on Guadalcanal so no official action can be taken. It was brought out in the test! many of both Mr. and Mrs. Brooks that Lieutenant Bush hart not been natural since he returned. In fact, Brooks testified (hat he did not rec- ognize Bush when he first returned to the Brooks home where his wife and baby daughter. Barbara Don. resided. Both testified Busli was highly nervous and had weeping spells. din-Simrr.ons uni received east of installal! bcmbs. Heavies attacking northeast- ern France and Belgium struck at marshalling yards at Mul- bouse, Belforl, Safcgucmines, Mctz, Thionvillc, Charlcroi am! Blainville in France; Brussels and l.lcff, in Belgium, and air- fields near Nancy and Gretljny In France and Antwerp and Brussels in Belgium. Thursday attacks matched the day's assault for May 20, when 000 planes dropped an estimated tons of bombs on European targets, but on that day all the at- tacks were made by bombers based in Britain. Allied aircraft droned monoton- ously over the channel from a. m. until late in the afternoon, and and the report said. "The sugar 1s still difficult anct civilian supplies of the principal commercially can- ned vegetables for the pack year beginning July I will be the short- est in years. "The amount of canned fruits allocated to civilians will be about the same as last year's short'sup- present point-holiday on canned vegetables was termed only temporary, and points will be re- slored at a date now unpredicta- ble. Twenty percent less canned vegetables will be available for civilians in the year starling July 1 than in the current year while a 15 percent drop will be felt In to- mato and other vegetable juices. The reason. OWI said, is an estl- malcd 70 percent grcalcr demand by the Army and Navy. On the other hand, there will be a 28 percent Increase in the civilian supply of baby foods, canned soups. uaked beans specialties. and other canned strucled on and around the reat powers mentloncd.'but all olh T peace-loving slates should com and play their part In the slniggl world organizatlo hould be flexible and not rigl hat is, It should grow by practic and not try straightaway to wor >y a fixed code. fifth All powers, great and small, included in the world organ- izallon should strive for economic as .well as political collaboration. There was no evidence of trouble om-simrr.ons uintciaiu. lutt.rcu between Lieutenant and Mrs. Bush, his commission at the Army Air i The only disagreement that had force school, Lawrcnceville, 111. He occured was whether she should go _ _ _ ii___i t cinoif n-iiK him tn hi i now had operational training al Sioux City. Iowa. Prior to entering ser- vice in June, 1943. he was an air- craft worker In Burbank. Calif. Relay Launched PHILADELPHIA. May The first regularly scheduled com- with him immediately to his new si a I Ion (Camp Breckcnridge, Ky.) or wait until be obtained a place for her and their baby to live. They agreed a few days earlier that he should go to Camp Breck- cnridge alone but that she and the baby would go with him to Inde- pendence. Mo. for a visit with his .llu. iu, j, mercial television relay system in I Bnd [hat she and the baby the country was inaugurated to night with the opcnlntt ot a New York-to-Philadelphia relay trans 11. Umi. JO It I" one correspondent reported that like It had been seen or heard before" In Ihe Dover strait As the American bombers stream- ed out lo attack the west wall. Ber- lin and the German transportation center of Aachen still smouldered from pre-dawn attacks by 500 Brit- ish heavy bombers, which also hit targets in occupied territory. One of the most significant fea- tures of the tactical operations in progress from British bases Is that, out of approximately cvco 400 planes sent out by the Allied Expeditionary Air Force (mci'.ium mltter during a demonstration at the Franklin institute. wonM return to Abilene from there. Brooks testified that he had been with Lieutenant Bush in a car about 39 minutes prior lo the shooting ar.d that Bush was "very Jittery." He came Into the house still in The Weather Vets Get Guide On Job Methods WASHINGTON. May 25- W, Selective service tonight provided a guide for the unemployment of war veterans in their former Jobs. In the first codification of the guarantees of the selective ser- vice and training act. the agency told local draft boards add their reemployment commilteemen as- signed to handle veterans' prob- lems that: During a veterans' period of ac- tive sen-ice his seniority rights ac- cumulate in the same manner they would if he had remained contin- uously at his civilian Job. It was pointed out. however, that n commonwcanii mmm. in any'lu He had made Jyurie the past 1 tu're world orga'nliatlon must be re year in Paducah and for 23 prior to that time had been lu the contracting business here. Mr. Horn built the city hail and a number of school buildings here. He was born in Virginia on Ocl. 16, 1672. and came to Texas In 1861, settling near Greenville. He moved to Abilene In 1920. Survivors are his wife, five sons, Hugh, J. R. Jr., E. II.. H. B., and B. F., ail of Abilene; Ihree daughters Mrs. Harold Girdner of Abilene Mrs. Wayne Evaas of Hereford and Mrs. E. P. Boyd of Ranger: a brother, W. W. Horn of Greenville a sister. Mrs. W. F .Russell o Gainesville: and 10 grand children Funeral will be held at 3 p. m Friday at Kikcr-Warren chapel with the Rev. W. O. Vaught, pastor o the University Baptist church, offi- ciating. Burial will be in the Cedar Hill cemetery under the direction of the Masonic Lodge, of which he was a member. He also was a mem- ber oi the Shrine at Fort Worth and was a member of the First Bap- tist church here. Pallbearers will be members of Demos Will Name Keynoter June 15 CHICAGO. May meet- ing of the Democratic arrangements committee to select a keynoter and recommend a permanent chairman for the party's national convention today was set for June 15 at Chl- light and 339 have con-.c back. Ihc Masonic Lodge. Honorary pall- bearers Include Guy McCarly. J. R. Fielder, Gilbert Pcchacek, D. A Galloway, Oscar Rose, Paul Power John Htnkle. W. H. Morrison, Glen Diigan. George Swlnncy and George Morris. The call was announced by Demo- cratic National Chairman Robert E. Hanncgan. He summoned members of the arrangements group to meet at a. m. on June 15 at the Stevens hotel. The convention will open here on July 19. Authoritative quavtrrs In Wash- Officlal reports Indic.iltd that the enemy was making In sev- eral places for new counterat- tacks to break the force of LI. Gen. Mark VI'. Cbrk's thrust to- ward Ihe Kalian caplloi. As the Nails reelnd back upon (heir "lait defense Hue the Klernal Clly, they were relentlessly hammered by Allied infantry nnd armor and by jclouds of Allied warplancs. From north o! Home long col- umns of enemy reinforcements were seen rushing toward the unequal battle, a last-minute expedient Field Marshal-Albert Kesselrlng as he sought to avert a rout. Allied fighter planes and bombers were sweeping low and taking a terrible, toll of these reserves. In two days more than 1.000 German vehicles had been destroyed or damaged from the air. t (A Swedish correspondent quoted a German military spokesman in i Berlin as declaring that "Rome will bn defended." The German high command dally communique said Kesselring was withdrawing to a. new line "northeast of the Appian The four-month epic of the Anzto beachhead ended officially at a. m. lod.iy. when Capt. Ben Souza. of Honolulu, a momber of the beachhead forces, halted his patrol of 2o men at a point a few miles brlcw Llttorla on the coastal road. Approaching him he saw It. Fran- This rate of loss is a quarter o one per cent and has been held to that figure for the last month. Among targets hit by British medium and lighter bombers opcr- in order to fiuallfy for reinstate- ment in a former position, vete- rans must be qualilled to handle Two More Nazi Transports Sunk LONDON, May lion ol two more German trans ports in the Gulf of Finland by Rus- sian planes was announced lontzb In th? broadcast Moscow communl Ington reported recently lliat Haii- ncftan favored Gov. Robert S. Kcrr of Oklahoma tar the posl for >orary chairman and keynolcr. the job. the event a nervous condtlion. Mrs. Brooks i attng the AEAP were Lille, Valcn V S. DEPARTMENT OF WEVrnER PL-REAV ABILENE AND VICISITVi rTauJr Friday and Saturday IT.... lend and ITinndErilaTnu. said. missed him. Mrs. Brooks saw him "alone in a tar ojttide the house. She went out to the car to talk to him and found him crying. See BUSH. Page 3, Col. 6 rllT rtcttdj- Ftid o'l'rfd except r Chaplin Charges Joan Wanted Cash LOS ANGELES. May Berry and her mother brought R paternity suit against Charlie Chaplin, the comedian charged to- day. In the belief that rather than stand trial he would make a cash settlement. Chaplin filed an answer to the suit, asserting that the 21-year-old Miss Beny knew when the case was begun, and knows now, that the silver-haired actor-producer Is not and not be -the father of her 7-monthf-old baby, Carol TYF.ST TFNA and lEnr showc Plr .d thandtrstorTTH nit nf and in Del Ti Saturday. EAST Failly rtcodr and Silurday. Scattered 
                            

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