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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: May 25, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 25, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                BOND BOX SCORE iince Peorl Harbor May Quota May gftlenc Reporter MORNING VOL. LXIH, NO. 342 A TIXAS 3-U, WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TOFRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT Associated Preu IAF) ABILENE, TEXAS THURSDAY MORNING, MAY 25, 1944 -FOURTEEN PAGES VrMed Prw PRICE FIVE CENTS Allies Crash For Round-the-Clock Air Pounding Continues LONDON, Thursday, May was bombed 'fust after second blasting within about 12 hours RAF night raiders followed history's greatest aerial as- sault by bombers and fighters upon Hitler's Europe yes- terday from bases in Britain and Italy. The tremendous daylight offensive spread all the way ,-Irom the English channel to the Balkans and early today, after fresh waves of RAF bombers had been heard roaring toward the continent, the German radio reported that Berlin was attacked anew, along with the Rhineland industrial city of Aachen, 35 miles west of Cologne. r The Heich capital, raidet Tuesday night by RAF Mos- quitos, was subjected to its llth American assault of the war by nearly Flying Fortresses and as many escort- ing fighters in the climax of Wednesday's daylight opera- ion. From the Atlantic wall to points Abilene Lieutenant Kills Wife, Self on Eve of Vacation Jaunt VMurry Finance Extended; Jay Re-Elected i McMurry trustees .voted unani- mously Wednesday' afternoon to continue the Endowment and building fun! campaign, at present amounting to approximately 000, Dr. Harold G. Cooke, president th Pro the college, said. robably the largest single meet- Ing at any time since the organ- ization, 33 ol the 36 trustees were present and four advisory mem- bers attended. Alfred Snoke was reemployed to Assist In directing the endowment campaign to its conclusion. The bishop of the Northwest Tex- as and New Mexico conference of the Methodist church has been named the honorary chairman of the At present Ivan Lee Holt li serving as- bishop. ,.i Heelecled president of th e_ trus- tee was S. M. Jay. Dr. L. L. Evans of El Paso, pastor of the Trinity Methodist church there, was; named vice president, and W. J. Fulwiler of Abilene, second vice president. 'Robert Wylie. also of Abilene, Is secretary of the board, 'and Henry James, president of the Farmers and Merchants National bank, treasurer. leep in the Balkans, more than tons of explosives were dropped by British-based and Italy-based quadrons In the daylight attacks. Seventy-seven German fighters were shot down In fierce sky bat- tles along the route to Berlin, which was attacked by a strong force of Flying Fortresses from above a cloud cover, while from all British- based operations oy Americans, 32 bombers and 16 fighters were miss- Ing, a U. S. Air Force communique said tonight. A Liberator wins Bounced oh the 'Paris area, undefended by the overmatched Nail air force? and hamrriered enemy airfields at Mulunand Orly.to the south and to the northeast, making its bomb', runs against. to moderate (Ilk. By BETSY ROSS Death-dealing bullets from a .45 automatic pistol Wed- nesday afternoon put a sudden and heart-wrenching end to for a vacation trip and move lo a new home for 1st M. Donald K. Bush and his wile, the former Mary Alice 3 rooks. Lieutenant Bush, 25, home a scant two weeks after 15 months in Guadalcanal, fired four times at his wife, then turned the gun on himself and put a fatal bullet through his head. Mrs. Bush lived a brief time but was dead on arrival at Hendrick hospital. The shooting occured at 542 Highland in the living room of the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Brooks, parents of Mrs. Bush. Time of the murder- suicide has been set at approx- imately o'clock. Mrs. Brooks, sitting on the sofa holding the couple's seven-months- old baby, was benumbed with horror as she watched the officer chasing her daughter across the room. She saw him fire four times and Mrs. Busli fell Just at the front door. "I was afraid he was going to turn next on the baby" Mrs. Brooks said. "I ran with her to the neigh- bor's, hoping somebody could do It was too late for anyone to do anything. By the time Mr. Brooks arrived home Mrs. Bush had only a faint pulse beat and Lieutenant Bush was dead. in Italy Americans Cut Road 25 Miles From Rome ALLIKD HEADQUARTERS, Naples, May Canadian Innks broke through the heart of (lie Hitler Lino today ami swept up Hie Liri valley to the Malta river, 13 miles from Vassiuo; American troops recaptured Tcrracina on (lie coast, ami a Yank armored avalanche burst from tho Anzio beachhead and cut the Appian Way barely 25 miles from Rome. The Canadians, thrown into the Italian fighting as a sepa- rate army corps for the first time, smashed through the Hit- Ler Line at its strongest point and raced on five miles beyond Pontccorvo, threatening to trap German garrisons there and Aquino, two of the most powerful fortress-towns in the defense belt. "Don had been out to camp tCamp Barkeley where he formerly was sta- tioned) all Mrs. Brooks said as she related the story of the iting. "He came in about n- i co-ordinated ORPHANED INFANT NOW-lsl Lt. Dowld K. Bush whoa Wednesday shot and killed his wife then killed himself, is thelr trip and abtwt finding shown holding the couple's orphan daughter, Barbara Don, a place to live at his new station. seven months old. The picture was made a few days ago He was talking in after Lieutenant Bush's return from 15 months in Guadal- ean'al. An invitation was extended lo the Southwest Texas Methodist Conference to elect one layman and one minister as trustees to McMur- ry, at the session. Present at the session was the first chairman of the board, Dr. J. P. Griswold of Clyde, super-annu- minister of the Methodist who announced that he was donating a second to the McMurry endowment and building fund. He gave his first, do- nation at the opening of the cam- laign. Goal for the campaign is Trustees expressed certainly that it would be reached success- fully in the near future. The board authorized presenta- tion of the degrees at the annual .commencement lo be held today. British Air Chief Says Invasion Near LONDON, May Mar- shal Sir Arthur Coninghatn. com- mander of the British Tactical Air Force, told his airmen today that bombing atone cannot beat Ger- 'jr.any, but "the very great day" Is approaching and pressure by all forces will be applied against the Nazis "from the south, from Rus- sia and from the west." Burn to Death HAMILTON. Ont., May Fire broke out at a dairy company's staff get-together In Moose hall early today and when the names died down six of 10 merrymakers '.Jere dead, seven were critically in- jured and 29 others were ser- iously hurt. It sault, Allied bombers and fighters from bases in Italy flew sor- ties, striking in the vicinity of Vienna, at rail links In northern Italy and at other targets In Aus- tria and Yugoslavia. Other fighters and fighter bomb- ers in this sixth straight day ot aerial invasion raked railyards and airfields behind the channel forti- fications in occupied France and Belgium. Portress gunners claimed 48 Nazi planes In combat over Berlin and fighters bagged 29 more. The bomb- er loss was the heaviest since May 12 when 42 were downed smashing synthetic oil plants around Leipzig. The Budapest radio broadcast an air raid alert late tonight, signalling the beginning of Ihe seventh day of aerial blows. British Typhoons made a hlthly successful twilight attack on large oil storage installations near Amiens. More than 350 Marauders and Havocs of the Ninth Air Force Join- ed the attack wllh blows at air- fields at Aichiet, SO miles north of Paris, Beauvals-Tille. 35 miles north and at Beaumont le Roger. All planes returned, headquarters an- nounced. Railways and other mililary tar- gets in northern France were at- tacked by RAF Typhoons and Spit- fires. Tonight hundreds of Allied planes streamed across the Dover stral with more loads of destruction. Thunderbolts and Lightnings and fighter-bombers mingled with RAF formations In the outbound traffic. The Mediterranean air force sent Its may have num- bered counting the Nibcrsdorf aircraft factory and other targets near Vienna as well as military targets at Graz in Aus- tria and Zagreb in Yugoslavia, en- countering spirited opposition in some sections. Paris was lelt to fend for itself by the overmatched Luftwaffe as United Stales bombers swept In to knock o'ut German alrlields skirt- Ing the old capital of France. Only flak bothered the big ships on their bomb runs. Advance on Airfields By LEONARD MILUMAN Associated Press War Editor ......b Reinforced American troops broke a five-day stalemate By his right side wa on northwest New Guinea, Gen. Douglas MacArthur an-1 the' pistol and) five jjmpty ._shcU nounced today, and pushed across the Tor river toward two They went Into the sun-room, where the packed .bags were, and an In- .stint liter 1 jscrjam, 'tfo Don, the living He was jrightjbehind'he with' the pistol. Just'-as-she got ti I the front door lie shot at her fou [times. We didn't know he even owned a gun." Dr. J. L. Pickard, who examinee Mrs. Bush at the hospital, said twi bullets entered her body. One wa in the arm and the other. Infllctin 1 the fatal wound, was In the chest. Officers summoned to the seen found Mrs. Bush's body on the fron porch and that of Lieutenant Bus on the living room floor near Ih LURDERED BY HUSBAND Fatally shot Wednesday ftcrnoon by her husband, n rst lieutenant, was Mrs. Don- Id Bush, the former Mary Jice Brooks of Abilene. Mur- er of Mrs. Bush and flic of- icer's subsequent suicide oc- curcil in the home of her par cnts at 542 Highland. Supported by tanks, Amer- ican troops fought their way back into Terracina afler an hour and, a half battle early to- day, in which they crushed German defenses in a hillside cemetery before the coastal town. American patrols first entered Terracina last Sun- day, only to retire when Nazi reserves were rushed against them. Heoccupatlonof the town brought the Amcrlciins in the coastal sec- tor of the southern tip of the Pon- tine plain, less than 30 miles down the Appian way from where bit- ter fighting rngKt for Clstema. en- Americans Beat Deep-Dug Nazi lerracina Guard By SID FEDER WITH AMERICAN FIFTH ARMY FORCES IN TERRACINA, May U. S. Infantrymen smashed through deep-dug German defenses in the tombs and crypts of cemetery hill before Terracinn emy bastion at the north of the I despite heavy mortar and machine- ew Anzlo beachhead. Tonight doughboys swarmed in upon Clstcrna after having cut a mile stretch of the Appian lifeline southeast of the town and severed its railway connection with Home lo Ihe northwesl. In a lale dispatch from the cachhead Daniel DC Luce of the ssoclatcd Press said the armored harge still was going forward un- heckcd at'B.pm, and that hun- reds of German prisoners "still eun ftre captured this larga Japanese airdromes on Maffin bay. The Weather r. s. nrrARTMRST or COMMERCE WEATHER BUREAU ABILENE AND VICIXITV: PJlllr rlnfldr ThQUilar and FrMiy. Sralltr- H Ififtwfn ln  for the Information which they had supplied since Feb- ruary. The newspaper Aftonbladet said all three were charged with sup- plying a foreign power with the size of orders nnd their deslinatton. The report of the arrest of the three coincided with a statement by a United States legation source that It was hoped some announcement could be made tomorrow regarding the Allied, negotiations lo stop Swedish ballbearing shipments to. Germany. There was no Intimation killed in action, It was announced oi its nature, however. I today. Rule. Mrs. Grlssom had liied virtually- all her life in Callahan county, moving to Rule recently. She lived for many years rear Cottonwood. She is survived by several chil- dren, including a son. Robert, over- seas with the medical corps, her husband; six sisters and a brother. Writer's Son Killed LONDON, May 2  Granite from the hmt of Tetas hills. hKe that from which the state capitol buildinc was built, was being fought today for the 36th Division memorial to be erect- ed nt Salerno. Italy, where Texarss first died in the invasion of Eu- rope. Officials of Bro.wnwood American Lfgion and Veteran of Ftoreign W.in; posts, pledged See PACIFIC, I, Col. 1 night Thursdas as a deadline. it was well over Texas." I north Burma."   

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