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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: May 14, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 14, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                BOND BOX SCORE Since Pearl Harbor May Quoto Way SUNDAY VOL. LXI1I, NO. 331 A TEXAS NEWSPAWR WITHOUV DR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS ff SUNDAY MORNING, MAY 14, 50 PAGES IN FOUR SECTIONS XHcetete. M ABILENE, TEXAS Prfw flW PHICE FIVE CENTS Outer Gustav Defenses Crack Major Targets In Germany Blasted t LONDON, Sunday, May thousand U.' S, omber and American-Allied fighters hammered three ma- jor targets in northern Germany yesterday and shot down 63 Nazi planes in sky duels which cost the invading Ameri- cans 12 bombers and 10 fighters. Up to 750 Flying Fortresses and Liberators, escorted in- land by nearly U. S. Lightnings, Mustangs and Thun- derbolts, and covered 'in their withdrawal by hundreds of RAF Mustangs, attacked a Focke-Wulf plant at Tutovv, rail yards and locomotive repair shops at Osnabruck, a synthe- tic oil refinery in the Stettin area and other targets. Fights Seen Tor Texas' Meet AUSTIN, May New and substantial indica- The formation was part of a total of approximately American and British planes which hurled tons of ex- plosives on occupied Europe in two-way attacks from Brit- ain and Italy during the day. The bag of 63 German planes, 54 by the fighters and nine by- bomber gunners, made a two-day total ol 213 Axis aircraft shot down over Germany. No enemy opposition was met over Osnabruck, the German pilots In- stead ganged up on the formations which flew deep into northeastern Germany. "Many enemy lighters Sons today were that the May I escort before they could reach our state Dernocratic convert- bombers." the communique said, tion here will be a lulu, if not The major blows in the daylong a downright brawler. attacks began around, midnight The.r convention Issue Is flafly when British night bombers lash- whelher Texas will send to the ed out from home bases at targels Jiational presidential nominating In France, Belgium and Germany, at Chicago a delegation thai and from Italian, bases at rail junc- Chinese Admit toyang Almost In Nippon Hands CHUNGKING, May 13 Japanese troops using up to 200 to within tanks have drivei two miles of Lo yang, the Chinese commam acknowledged tonight, am Chinese hopes of holding th ancient Honan province cita- del faded vapidly. Enemy troops made their deepest penetration to the west, and also had reached n point only three miles northwest of.the city, the high com- mand said. The Japanese appeared ready to German Resistance In Mountains Heavy ALLIED Naples, May Allied troops, on (he offensive in Italy, smashed deeper to- night into the heavily-fortified Gustav line, increasing the gains of (wo miles or more that they had recorded during the day but encountering grim resistance from the Germans spring a vast several hundred trap threatening thousand Chinese THEY 'CLEAN UP' FOR MOM_CreW members of the 7th Arniy Air Force Liberator in LI   port broadcast from Berlin which SIX villages taken by the said that Gen. Shunrcku Hata. A late dispatch from Associated Press War Correspondent Sid Feder told of the spectacularly swift fall of the village of Bantl Cosmo Da- iano to the American Fillh Army, conimander-ln-chlef of Japanese I orces in China, had arrived on the front onally the operations in that or.) Loss of Mienchih on Ihe '-cast west Lunghai railway, 42 miles west two mlics beyond the Garigliano of Loyang, to a Japanese column j Rnd of Penetration o. the Berlin Say's Invasion Is Almost Here LONDON, May from Shansl province in tlie north, adjacent stronghold of Casteifortc. was acknowledged by Hie Chinese. British Elglith Army troops also Another Japanese column from the lne vmage of Sanl' Angelo the west bank of the Rapido Kunyingtang, loss of which would river, two and one half miles south place the Invaders 15 miles from 0[ casslno, direct dispatches said. Tungkwan, gateway lo China's great northwest. high command normally the Although the special to be a trip an extra tax on the already crowded train Molher's'and bus lines. Soviet Bombers BISHOP SUSPENDS PRIEST WHO MEISWI1H STALIN I SPRINGFIELD. Mass.. May 13- or perform any other divine duties. said Nail fighter resistance was negligible after Friday's duels in which 150 German planes were shot clown at a cost of 4.2 American bombers and 10 fighl- ers. Osnabruck Is a. highly Importanl rail center in the Ruhr, a junction of lour main lines. Tulow, 105 miles Berlin and 35 miles east of the Baltic sea port of Rostock, was Ihe second of A plan Is under study to set up 1 several tarkets attacked in r.orth- headuarurs In Austin for lining Ern Germany, up members of uninstrucled dele- it was the 16th operation In 13 for a forfrth lenn, although oavs f0r tnc American heavy bomb- ol the advocates o! this plan ami (hey left their British bases has yet permitted use of his name In connection with It. Big Spring WACs Greetings BIG SPRING, May soldiers at the Big Spring Bomb- ardier school received Mother's day greetings it wasn't Just a few hours after about 750 RAF night bombers had dumped I 000 tons of bombs on rail targets I at Louvain, and other targets In northwest Germany and France at a. cost of 14 planes. D- DKJ The soldiers happened to be in a WAG unit assigned to the field. They were Pvts. Ethel Mullins, Tulia, Tex.; Lois Pralt. Phoenix. Ariz.; Falvia Kramer of Deer Lodge. Mont.; Annie Terry, Tyler. Tex.: '4nd Sgt. Georgia Joyce ot Atlanta, rancher of Balrd, nas brought In a big rattle snake that he killed on his ranch south of 3aird. The rattler measured 5 ft. 3 In. with 12 rattles, some having been broken off. It was a diamond back rattler. Dickey says that the rattlers arc more numerous this year than ever before. Stanislaus Orlemanski ran into a stormy homecorninj today from his flying visit to Moscow and conference with Premier Stalin, get- ting a prompt suspension by his bishop as R greeting and riuickly declaring in return he was "being crucified for my church." The Poltst.-Arr.erican priest im- mediately sale he was appealing the suspension Oder, stripping him of all priestly pryileses. to the apos- tolic delegate n Washington. The appeal, he told newspaper- men at a conference, auto- matically the suspension order and madelt possible for him to carry on his Varish duties pend- ing action by :ie apostolic dele- gate. Archbishop Amlelo Cicognani on the appeal. (Diocesan aullorities, disagreed with ths statement, say-1 Ing that the suspension remained in force until highe: .church otficials had ruled upon tfr'.appenl. (They also sairt that failure to .omply' with the imally would be X. a further of canon law and could lead to tie Imposition ol heavier punishmer.U Most Rev. Thorns M. bishop of the Spri'.gfield diocese, announced the only a few hours after Fr. orlemanski re- turned from Russia, '.he suspension staled Ihe priest cou'.l. r.ot admln- I istcr the sacraments, rlebrate mass The priest told the newsmen "I went to Moscow lo sec what I could GO for the church In Poland, the Ukraine and While Russia. But Stalin made it universal. He went bevond my expectallor.s and agreed not lo pcrsecule the Catholic church not only in those places but in anj part of Russia. Guinea Japs Heavily Bombed ADVANCED ALLIED H E AD- QUARTERS, New Guinea. Sunday. May bombers have heavily bombed Japanese bases and troop concentrations in northern New Guinea, Gen. Douglas MacAr- thur announced today. Mokmer airdrome on Bial: island, 260 miles north of captured Hollan- dia in dutch New Guinea, was hit twice by Liberators Friday. Biak Is in the Schoutcn group. One of the attacking Liberators was downed by enemy antiaircraft He'went further than that In lire. agreeing to co-operate with the Other planes from MacArthur s church against persecution any-1 W me west "This Is a test case. If we cannot agree with Stalin on religion, how then can we gel together with Staiin on material French troops attached lo the Fifth' Army swept on past .their original objectives, and Mark W. Clark, commander of. Fifth conffatiilalcrt Gtn Alphonse'Jutn; Hie French commander. "You ;ire proving lo an anxiously awaiting France (he has re- turned, sacred lo Ms Ilnrst lighting Clark told LONDON, May nlm' -The Soviet high command an- NEW y0nK. May no.unced today Russian bombers at- al Algiers reported tonight lacking German military trams and In Italy had stores at Daugavpils Latvia and Tartu in touched ofl violent explosions and IDvlnsk) Nazi used railway through Estonia nan I pass in n raid today. iut broadcast was recorded by the fires Friday night in a possible pre- communications commls- ludc to a fresh Red army northern offensive. u g heavy bombers concentrat The German high command on billing 14 rail centers In The German communique, most conservative of the daily, fixtures broadcast by the Ber- lin radio, declared today that the Allied air offensive aginst the Nazi continent "may be regarded as the prep- aration for invasion." .It was the. first time that the man comrifarfd, now confront- ed by an Aljied sea and air siege, bad-used the -worfl "invasion" in its daily bulle- tins, and the Nazi pfeis spec- ulated that the blow would 'all simultaneously with a new Russian offensive. Inside France the Nazis were ported rushing final preparations, requisitioning all remaining auto- mobiles and speeding "Rommel plan" under which virtually the en- British New Guinea, also was Fr. Orlemanski ment. typed in I said, was Stalin's signed agreement not to persecute the church. Indicated that Russian troops In force had smashed across the Mol- dava river. CO miles Inside Romania, when it told ol fighting between Ro- manian soldiers and a full Soviet rifle division on the west bank ol that river. Neither the Germans nor Ihe Rus- sians mentioned the lower Dneslr river section near Tiraspol. Where Berlin had declared that a Russian bridgehead had been erased and where Moscow said German counter- attacks had tailed. No essential changes occurred on the long land fronl. Moscow said. In all sectors during Friday's fighting Russian forces wrecked 40 enemy tanks nnd 23 planes, the communique said. Pouncing on a Norway-bound Ger- man convoy in the Barents sea last Thursday Russian pianos of the far creased their unprcccderitcd bag of Vets Make Gifts, Despite Wounds 101 invaded April additional Japanese ve killed and in prisoners by 30. Tills brings the total of enemy dead in the area to 1.116 and the number of captured to 354. These enemy troops fled i-iland at the May During time of the Invasion, the past month soldiers with slift The Blak raid by Liberators finoers and wrists lrom battle in- brought up no ,'npanese 'ntcrccptors Juries have been busily weaving. I at night and other heavy bombers painting, printing, and making I came back with fighter escort the gifts to honor Mothers all over Ihe following da.- but still the enemy what officially was termed "the cli- matic phase of 'an operation strangle' In the Allied air powers plan to destroy supply lines through which Hitler feeds the forces re slstlng Ihcvncw offensive of the Fifth and Eighth Armies." Grim lighting developed at every point where the Allies pene- trations into the formidable de- fenses, and the Germans lashed out in a scries of determined, but costly counterattacks. Allied headquarters officially an- nounced gains of a milc-and-a-haif. nnd front dispatches later told of advances of twb to Ihrce miles at some points-. Sector by sector here are the high spots In the official accounts ot the first day of Ihe offensive: 1. North and west ot Minturno. on the sector .icarest the Tyrrhcn- northcrn command sank eight ships scai American troops captured convoys totalling 12.000 tons, four escort vessels, a minesweeper and a coastguard cutler, the sup- plement said. Six German aircraft also were declared shot down. El Salvador Hears Normal Life Again WASHINGTON. May 13 _ Central American republic of "he" havVbcen lii6 New Guinea coast from El Salvador was reported tonight lo fpcndin; leisure time making gifts jAlcxishafcn toward the Hollanrtla- be approaching normal afaln alter United States this mother's day. Patients from every theater ol didn't attempt to send u? fighters. Australian troops, worVing their Taylor's Fifth War Loan Goal Higher Taylor, county's Fifth War Loan Is and the E se- ries bond quota Sl.255.000, C. M. Caldwell. Taylor county war bond chairman, was Informed yesterday by Nathan Adams. Dallas, chair- man of the state war finance com- The over-all quota is higher than that of the Fourth War Loan drive, but the Series E quota Is lower. This is in line with the national quotas for Ihe Fifth drive as compared with 000 Is expected from fiose of the Fourth, the over-all purchasers and in E bonds. "It's going to be the toughest. the most intensive, and the most Important- money-raising under- taking of the said Adams in a statement Issued in Dallas. Period for the Fifth War Loan drive will be from June 12 to July 8. Individual crisis the thousands-stons army of victory volunteers are 5eing ask- i til i lats, metal, shells, coins from for- ICspe Croisillcs. They iczchcrt Mel- cign countries, and other scrip ma- plantation, 30 miles from Ma- terial in the occupalional therapy dang. section of McCIoskey General hos- Yesterday's communique to.d ot 'an aerial foray into the area of the 'P.ilau Islands. Japan's naval base on the southeast approach to the disrupted the past ?ix weeks four strategic hills. Two counter at- tacks against the" newly-gained po- sitions were repulsed. 2. American Infantrymen suppcrt- CQ by tanks advanced a mile north- ward and captured the village o Cercob! while another force wrest, cd the village of Vcnlos.i. Dam'.ani Hill and another 1.000-foot pea! from the Germans in r stiff battle gaining footholds only n mile of Castelforte, 13 miles roulh o Cassino. San Sebasllano. a thin village near Caslelforle. also wa taken. 3. French troops mi the Flfl Army's right wing .warmed up th tit N.onte Fait tire male population ot France be- tween the ages ot 16 and 60 would be put In concentration camps on D-Day lo safeguard the German rear. The German command described the new Italian oflenslvi as being -on the largest scale" and as "an. obvious attempt to tie down Ger- man thus linking the as- with the expected western In- asion. German Recounts took the new Allied offensive against the Guslav line M being only the forerunner ol a bursting storm. "The German high command espccts the ilarc-up of fight- ing In Italy to spread to other sections of the European bat- said Ihe Nazi trans- ocean ncw.s agency. Sea along the "Invasion ront" flared up, British admiralty ommunlquc announcing brisk new kirmlshes in Ihe English channel no man's land" in which fresh ilows were directed at convoys which the Nazis were seeking to ;llp through the strait In an at- .empt to move supplies by water to ease the strain upon the bornb- jocked rail system. British light naval forces fired :wo ships and damaged two others n one small convoy yesterday, and a French destroyer skirting close to shore which was or.ce Its own broke up a strong lorcn ol Nazi .E- Boats today, sinking one. Ihe Weather Philippines. Texans answered the Fourth cd to do more than e'er belorc. of this drive enilrcly up to the individual-ln; Individ- ml must buy more thsn ever be-1 and he stressed. "Think ol invasion. Thi try to think of not buying extra xmds in the Fifth War Loan drive' j In Texas mill cornel from individuals alone. Acms re- :aled. "This is more thn hill Flame Throwers Dislodge Enemy by a bloxly abortive revolt and ccncral strike which to resigna- tion 01 President MAximliiano Her- nar.cicz Maitlnez. The strike was cal'.ed oil follow- ing the departure ol Hernandez Martinez lrom the cc.un'.ry ar.d a pledge by his succtw-r. Gen. Andres Ignado Hcnenrtez, that amnestry wjld be granted all those pjiti- clpalln? In the April 2 revolt. The r.ew president also promised free- dom of speech and the'press ar.rt said that flections wnuld be called WITH THE F.1GHTH U. S. EV-I f0on for a constitutional a.'.icmbly. and then c.iplurrc! the surroui'-din heights, smashed a violent counte Sre firSTAtt LINE, Tf. 13, Col. W. Promotion in Army Temporary promotion of William Harrison Tato. jr., 2218 rrrth 3rd, to first lieutenant in th' field ar- tillery was announced last night by Ihe War department. V. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMrRCF. KEATI1F.R RCKF.AU ARILT.NF. AND VICINITY: Sonrlar anA nnl :FiAnp< In Irmperalgrr. EAST TF.XAP-r.Tllr H.orfr ..........__________ _ ACUATION. HOSPITAL O.V THE I MAIN FIFTH ARMY i-'RONT. May 13 During the second Europe rlondr nd Mondav. Uidrlr vatlcrrd nd IhDndrrthAKCn In sji. AM Fri. not R s.i. TM national quota being higher but the E series quota lower. The national quota Is 16 billions national E quota three and the billions. The state's quota will be 'WO COO, State Chairman Adams an- nounced. RI this amount War Loan call for with a lusty J419.COO.OOO. Is zero hour, the victory said "It will be a big and vital effort, and It will not be easy. All of the nearly seven mlllon people In Texas may as well face the hard facts at the outset of this crusade." Adams Eafd. that In this hour ol the goal for Txas. It can be dene, it has been p-Aed In the Fourth War Man drit." he went on. "Our overall assmrr.cnt was and Texas raisec.' Is mor. than the over-all quota for the -Back the Attack-Buy More Than Before." Is the sloga for the coming campaign. 7( in fix TR '.I II M ;f. 73 1! 
                            

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