Questions? Call (888) 845-2887 Hablamos Español

Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: May 4, 1944 - Page 1

Share Page

Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

Issue Date:

Get 1 more page view just for clicking

to like us on Facebook


   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - May 4, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                BOND BOX SCORE Jince Peerl Harbor May Salti MORNING WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT LXIII, NO. 322. A TEXAS 2-ttp ABILENE, MORNING, MAY 4, 1944 -TWELVE PAGES Associated Prett (AP) VnlM Preu PRICE FIVE CENTS -Germany Undergoing 20th Day of Raids "Bombs Rake Rabaul 'With 2-Plane Loss ADVANCED ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, New Guinea, May Douglas MacArthur announc- ed today that bombers and fighters heavily raked the Rabaul, New Britain, area, at a cost two planes. Headquarters disclosed thai last Saturday during an at- tack on Rabaul SMALLGERMANFORCE READY TO COMBAT INVASION JAPS ATTACK SOUTH WIMPIIAL Japanese forces attacking in the Palel area, south of Imphal, it was disclosed, indicating the ex- pected .mass assault on Im- phal might come from jthat British drives north of Jmphal have.check ed the Japanese in the Ko hima-Imphal sector of India. (AP Wire Rebuilding of Bill WASHINGTON, May 3 W) Plans for an International educa- tion agency, designed to help re- build war-wrecked educational sys- and promote ft free exchange of ideas among nalicns, will be laid before congress, the State depart- ment announced today: The department issued a report on the accomplishments of the Am- erican delegation to the conference Allied, ministers .of education in London and Kep. Fulbriglit delegation chairman, said the coun- try had a new opportunity to pro- mote the cause of peace through in- ternational security. A In this connection Pulbright brought out that the proposed con- stitution for the international edu- cation agency will deal with the question of international press free- dom the ideal of a free exchange of ideas among all peoples. on Kabaul two planer and two patrol torpedo boats were lost in a clash through failure of the raiders to rec ognize each other as friendly There were some casualtie as a result. (Tokyo radio Wednesday nigh announced in a broadcast monltore by NBC at New York that a squad ron of .Allied motor torpedo boats made a "hit and run" raid on Ra haul recently. The broadcast lisle one boat as sunk and another as damaged. A squadron ordinaril would number about A spokesman said that in lat- est, operations around American Sixth army Invasion holdings at Ifollandia and Aifape on north New Guinea 109 Japanese have been killed by patrols. Previous- ly more than 600 enemy dead had been listed in the .same sector which was Invaded April 22. Targets which recently have be- come familiar in the communiques in the western Carolines and the Schouten Islands north- west of'Hollandia were men- tioned anew today. Liberators hit Ihem. In trie latest raid reported on Rabaul, Mitchells and fighter bomb- ers from-the Solomons dropped 88 tons of explosives on defense In- stallations at a plantation east of the town-and attacked an airfield runway on nearby v Duke of York Island, pix gun positions were -barges In Keravla bay, adding to the toll of small boats on which Ihe enemy has placed reliance because of heavy losses among larger shipping. AJong the New Guinea coast, where isolated Japanese caught in a 270-mile area between Altape and Alexlshafen are trying to escape, other barges were damaged by swift F-T boats which also shelled the shore. LONDON, May Germans concluded "with sorrow" today that there was no chance for a last-minute negotiated peace and reslgn- d themselves to meeting the Allied Invasion of Western Europe with an rmy estimated In London to total 61 fewer than 000 men. From the day's usual outpouring of Invasion gossip by the Oerrnan- ontrolled continental radio and press, London observers deduced that the were preparing industriously. to meet early attacks on the west, south and east and that Hitler had not depleted his Russian-front forces o bolster the Atlantic wall. Military observers here estimated that Germany and her satellites had a total of 319 divisions for the climactic struggle, dividing them In his fashion: Russian divisions. Finnish Italian including 19 south of Rome. Western Europe, from Northern Norway to Southern Five years ago a German division ordinarily was counted at a strength of about men, with some armored divisions smaller. Now, however, a London informant declared, some divisions are "mere shadows of their former selves" while "a very considerable numbev are under-strength." This military observer flatly disputed a Stockholm report that 50 German divisions had recently been transferred from the Russian front to the west, dismissing the story as a German alibi for reverses In Russia "It Is he said, "that some divisions shattered on that (the Rus- sian) front have been re-formed, re-trained and put In the west for fur- ther training, but in some cases they have been replaced by outfits moved from the west." He declined to comment on probable' disposition of German forces in France at present. RAILROADS BEAR BRUNT OF RENEWED RAF BLASTS LONDON, 20lh day of an un- interrupted Allied air thunderous strokes by official estimate already have finished off the ability of Nazi railroads in Northern France and Belgium to carry the full load demanded by (hem by Allied over Soviets Blast Rails, Airfields Northern Italy Communication Given Pounding ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Na- ples, May 3 Northern Italy's tortured rail and sea communica- tions have been given another heavy night and day pasting by the Allied Mediterranean air force in its d'elermined effort to isolate German armies in the south from their supply sources, Allied head- quarters announced today. The ceaseless bombing has had such a devastating effect that the Nazis are operating these lines only by dint of prodigious repair work. Last night Genoa, La Speza and Llvornd were blasted for the fifth successive night by RAP Welling- tons. A great rectangular area 'ot La set. aflame and a Territory Over Romania and Poland Blasted B-24 Staggers lo New Record Angelo Seaman Medal WASHINGTON, May War department today announced the following awards of the Sol- Medal: To Marvin L. McLeod. Cpl., CAC, Pontatoc. Mason county. For: Heroism in attempting lo rescue a comrade from drowning and in assisling to shore a coast guardsman In danger of drowning. 9 To Louis M. Spears, Seaman 2d Cl., U. S. Navy, care Mrs. Anna E. Spears. Quarters 10, Sunset Drive, Good- fellow Field, San Angelo. For: Heroism displayed In res- en enlisted man from drown- ing Sept. 16, 1943. In the Central Pacific area. When a soldier at- tempted to swim ashore from a moored landing crall, he became weighted down, and exhausted after going about 25 yards, he called for Aelp. Spears, with com- plete disregard for his own life and wish knowledge of the slron? un- dertow and the presence of sharks, dived into Ihe water and supported .the soldier until further help from brought about his safety. This reflects credit on Seaman Spears and upon the naval forces of the United States. WASHINGTON, May 3 Of] Packin1 Mama" packed a of a wallop to set a new record of 15 enemy planes shot down In a single engagement. Ehe was a B-24 Liberator of the 15th Air Force in the Mediterran- ean, arid she got kicked around so badly that the Jerry fighters were already concentrating on her as an easy-kill straggled before she man- aged to Stagger through to the tar- get at Regensburg and leave a load of bombs for the Germans to re- member her by. She did It, though, and with the help of another Liberator from her group which flew alongside to help fight off the attackers, managed to keep going until she friendly territory, and could bail out. Reporting the incident today, the Army said that all the crew got the Distinguished Flying Cross, nine of them presented personally by the ISth's commander, Maj. Gen. Na- than F. Twining, and Ihe 10th awarded posthumously. Heavy'expioslm'.fbckSl the area .of the gas works. Another great fire was report- ed in the Piacenza rail yards, 40 miles southeast of Milan on the main Mont Cenis-Bologna-Rimini route following an attack by RAF Hallfaxes last night. Milan also was bombed. In. daylight'yesterday American Liberators hit La Spezia harbor and also bombed Castel Maggiore and Faenza In the Bologna area; Parma 50 miles northwest of Bolcgna and Fano, on the east' coast line be- tween Ancona arid Rimini. In' daylight and dark, medium bombers also attacked numerous points throughout the area, includ- ing the rail yards at Florence and many bridges north of Rome. Fifiht- er-bombers bombed Adriatic ship- ping off the Dalmatian ccast. Altogether 1.800 sorties were flown to the round-the-clock offensive. Six Allied planes were missing, the headquarters communique said, and one enemy aircraft was destroyed. FIRST YANK FIGHTER PLANE LANDS AT The first U. S. fighter plane to land, roars down the Korako thpee miles, southjbf; ;Aitape in P-38-carrie'd commander of the 5th Ai Force fighter command. {AP BILBO READIES 18-MONTH LONG POLL IAX SPEECH WASHINGTON, May 3 Senator Bilbo (D-Miss) laid claim today to the most potent.store of poll lax ammunition on Capitol Hill a speech 18 months long! JAP ROCKS DON'T FOOL MR. MARINE was over her crew WASHINGTON, May 3 You can't fool a Marine. During the fighting on one of the Islands in Eniwetok atoll, cornered Japanese threw rocks at surround- g leatherneck units and shouted, Marine headquarters lated today. The Marines, who .know rocks hen they see them, according to pi. William C. Capshaw, 22. of hawnee, caught the missiles i midair ar.d threw them back. Then they shot the Japs with real ullels. Start, Turn Back LONDON, May 3 The Lon- don Press quoted Stockholm's Af- lonbladet today as saying German reconnaissance pilots had observ- ed "Allied invasion troops embark- ing in Invasion vessels at British ready to sail on several oc- casions, but the troops later ed again." land The Weather 'Irksome' Uniform WASHINGTON, May 3 Jfcalllng WAC uniforms "irksome, bulky and Rep. Celler (D-NY) declared today they should be replaced and tossed on the scrap heap. AB1LF.XE AND VICINITY: Ton-M rriblt cUldhirtt Thlllitj Tri daj-. in Umpfratnre Tliari dir- Sorntwhil narmrr Fridij. T.AS.T TfcXAS: Considerable otondl i Thursday. Somewhat warmer Ft WF.ST TEXAS: CeniUerably clend and Trldajr. I.tttle thanf En Itme-entire Tnvrjdir. warmer fr >T' TEMPERATURES Wed. AM Toei, HOl'R Wti. PM Toe foiret Dies MADRID, May 3 Paul Poiret, 64. once king of French fashion designers, died In poverty In a Latin quarter garret in Paris April 27. s German press report .ucelved hen today said. S3 S3 Cl fit fin 6.1 ta Cl CS M 1ft F4 -KG fii 1! an< Itpr lemperalorti Is 9 p. M and 19. Hltb and lew lime dale lail )e 91 and M. Some) lail nlrnt: Sanrlit IMs mernlnt; 6.50. New Jap Threat Facing Chinese CHUNGKING, May 3 (ff) Japanese forces, constantly increas- ing in numbers, are driving north and south along the Hankow-Pcip- ing railway in Honan province in a now-evident effort to occupy the entire line, the Chinese announced tonight. The Chinese communique esti- mated that about Japanese tioops now were actively engagec in the Honan campaign, with largi reinforcements being held In re serve. The original drive that began a fortnight ago was on the cast-wes railway which inlcrsects the Han kow-Pelping line at Chenghsien. The slow-speaking Mississipplan, hose famed, diamond horseshoe epin gleams as jauntily today as did during his 1942 filibuster gainst the same anti-poll tax bill, aid his speech would outdistance ven that of Senator Ellender (D- who has announced he is pre- ared for a 125-day protest against epeal of poll lax laws. Declared Bilbo: "I'll give thai peech, if necessary, in the only orum left in the world for free nd unlimited coinage of words tie Senate of the United States." Southern strategy against aboil- ion of poll taxes. Bilbo said, would Degin with a lengthy discussion ol whether the bill should be brought icforc the senate. Senate leaders have set May as the tentative date !or bringing up the bill. LONDON, May 3 Wide- spread Russian air raids on Axis railway junctions and air fields In Poland and Romania were announc ed tonight by the Soviet communi- que, which said that on the ground fronts there still were no cssentl; changes. It was the twelfth day of the land lull, Overnight, long-range Soviet planes hit German troop trains con- centrated at the junctions of Lwow In Poland, while oth- er Russian raiders struck airfields in Ihe areas of Lwow, Stanlslawaw, In the southeast corner of Old Po- land, and Roman in Romania, 37 miles west of las I. '-.At lyow there w'Jfe'ibout'Zd fires, ineludlrnj'flve particularly large ones, accompanied by ex- plosions, Ihe Russians -said. At Sarabor, 40 miles southwest of Lwow, explosions an'd brilliant flames followed the bombings, whieh Included hits on a train that hail just arrived, U was the second, consecutive raid on the Lwow rail Junction, the Rus- sians having reported that on Mon- day night [hey set fire lo six load- Germany early today. Two huge formations of Britain's heavy bombers were heard roaring across the east and south coasls o( England last evening, headed for the continent. The big RAF craft had had a one-night layoff. Tc Berlin radio began Just be- fore midnight to issue warnings that hostile planes were over west- ern and southwestern sections of the Reich; then Frankfurt and then Stuttgart went off the air. This followed a day and evening of widespread thrusts by U. S. Lib- erators and American Thunderbolts and against mystery Installations of Pas-De-Calais, across the thin waist, of the channel, In which not a plane was lost. Earlier yesterday British Mitchells and Mosquito bomb- rrs drove In against enemy mili- tary targets In northern France. .Yesterday iras Day No. 19 In grand assault of stupendous, almost unchallenged pre-Inva- slon aerial operations. Far greater squadrons of Amcrl- Peanut Fibre May Go Into Clothing .ions Convention 'o Abilene in 1945 District 2-E and state convention if Lions International will be held n Abilene next year. Abilene was awarded the district :onclave yesterday at the closing lusiness session of the 2-E conven- ion In Fort Worth. Site of the ilate convention rotates by districts and 1945 Is host year for district 2-E. The two conventions are to be leld In early June, announced mer Sims, who attended the dis- trict meeting at Fort Worth. Ivan Oliver, superintendent of schools at Stephcnvtlle, was elect- ed district governor, succeeding Joe Childers of Abilene. The Abilene club had the larg- est delegation at the convention and also the largest voting strength, based on club membership. SIAMESE TWINS STILL AIIVE PHOENIXVILLE. Pa.. May 3 Tlie blonde Stlcrly twins lived through a fourth day of joint exis- tence today, their linked bodies still withstnndlni; the death physicians say is Inevitable. "There is no change In their con- dition." was the hospital's only re- port late today, ar.d doctors and nurses w-ho have watched over the ed military trains there. In the blows at enemy airdromes, more than 00 German planes were destroyed on the ground, the com- munique said, while yesterday 38 Germans were brought down In air combat nnd by anti-aircraft fires. German broadcast accounts said the Russians used "numerous" In- fantry divisions and about 350 tanks In a battle about 40 miles west of lasi on the Siret river and that German and Romanian troops with- drew "in the face o: great numeri- cal superiority" of the Russians. The locality Is about the same as thai of Roman, where the Russians hit the German airfield. The German-Romanian garri- son at Sevastopol In Ihe Crimea still Is putting up fkrcc re- sistance against Russian air blows with all guns saved In tlie Retra, a Moscow dispatch said, but the eventual annihilation of this force was predicted as sup- plies became exhausted. A supplement to the Soviet com- munique menlioned N'azi attacks southeast of Stanislawow nnd south of Tiraspol which it said were re- pulsed, wilh 600 c! the enemy slain. can, British and Allied Air Forces look a breather after 18 days of endless assault that won this ac- colade from a spokesman of the Ministry ot Economic Warfare: Their brilliant actions against dozens of enemy railroad centers ic said, had created chaos In the German-held rail system piling up on the long, previous campaigns of bombing' and sabo- left that system In slate of partial paralysis In the areas most Imminently threatened. The system could not hope to do its full urgent Job necessary to re- pel Invasion. Today's new blows with thp .of a tolling a night of operations from Italy north lo Gerrriany. It- self. In these night attacks, RAF Mbs- qultos rode the air for 30 minutes over the German chemical city of Lcvcrkuscn near Cologne, dropping block busters In a steady stream down through the reddening darkness. In the soulh, the Mediter- ranean Air Forces siruck Genoa for the fifth straight night and bombed almost a score of otlicr Including tlic naval base of La Spezia, Llvorno. Flaccma, the Florence rail yards, Parma Facnra and Caslclmafslore. The Swiss re- ported damage In north- ern Italy. Fresh Flood Threat Looms In Missouri By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS Two obstreperous streams added fresh flood complications in Miss- ouri yesterday and the Illinois riv- er continued dangerously high be- low Beardstown, III., but the flood threat of Texas rivers was eased by a change In weather A cool wave moved Inlo the stats ending a 3-day period of wind and rain storms that caused eight deaths and sent east and central Texas rivers on a rampage. In central Missouri, the Grand river, which Is exlremely respon- sible to rainfall, boomed feet In 24 hours at Chllllcothe and tha Osage river climbed seven feet above flood stage at Tuscumbla. Federal trcops and state millta- men kept up a fight on the Illin- ois river to save several saturat- ed and weakened levees. The river has held Its flood crest almost sta-: tlonary at Beardstown and below for more than 80 hours. The Mississippi fell slightly along Its flood-swollen course from St. Louis to Cape GIrardeau, Mo. engineers were confident that rein- forced levees south of Cape deau would hold the river In bounds. tiny girls since their birth Sunday- could give no Indication how long the sUuEelc might continue. ATLANTA, May 3 Devel opment of a fibre from peanut pro tein which may provide a complete ly new type of fabric was anr.ounc ed today at the National Pcanu council In session here. Dr. K. S. Markley, of the U. S. n( southern research laboratory at New fUCK Ot Orleans, where research on the fibre has been carried on, told members of the council that the fiber Is silk- Approximately a truck load ot Burn in Warehouse like type and can be used wi'.li wool and cotton or alonf. matcher in tlie TI. O. Wootcn Grocer company caught fire about p.m. Wednesday. A fire pre venllon sprinkler system installed in the storasc rooms, kcpl the a Penicillin Supply Going to Baylor DALLAS. May 5 Baylor university hospital today was ap- pointed to serve as the iffldal de- pot distribution of limited'been determined late last night, amount of penicillin which the War I Average Crude Oil Production Gains NEW YORK, Mny 3 average gross crude oil production In the United States increased 950 barrels to during the week ended April 29. compared with a year ago, the American Pdrolcum Institute reported to- day. Refineries were estimated to have operated at 87.7 per cent of capa- city and ran barrels of crude oil to stills tialiy, compared with a percentage of 83.5 and capa- city ol 4.408.000 last week and 3.- To round out this night action, Allied Intruders went to Munich, shooting dO'.m live German planes while other Mosquito squadrons at- tacked rail yards at Achcres, near Paris. In discussing the plight of the Nazi rail system, the Economic Warfare Ministry spokesman cited these factors: Germany's action In 1941 In shift Ing the best French locomo lives cast for use In the Hussion campaign. The avcrago age of locomotives now in use is between 30 and 40 years and "most of them are due for the scrap heap." The rail system has been through four years of "atrocious mainten- constant attack, poor lubri- cation, sabotage and Intentional neglect. The normal necessary overhaul- Ing of locomotives is a year behind schedule because of crowded faclli- and the bombing of repair shops. Agencies Refuse To Unite Sales WASHINGTON, May Rcprescntallve Granger (D-Utah) said today that Commodity Credit corporation and Defense Supplies corporation, each holding a portion, of the huge wool stockpile, have de- clined to accept the proposal of vool growers that the government's loldlngs be consolidated and sold through one agency. The situation, he said, would hava no effect on previously announced arrangements for marketing the current domestic crop which the Commodity Credit corporation has agreed to take under the same ar- rangements and at about the sama prices as last year. Commodity Credit corporation, It was testified before Granger's ag- riculture sub-committee, holds ap- proximately pounds of domcslfc wool. Defense Supplies corporation controls about 000 pounds of foreign wool pur- chased largely to assure a sufficient supply in this country should ocean transportation be interrupted. Each agency, Granger says. In- sists on managing its own holdings and. so far as he knows. Commodity Governor Urges D-Day Prayers Credit corporation Hias no plans for disposing of the domestic store. Defense Supplies corporation, how- ever, has been selling some of its foreign wool at auction ar.d a rep- resentative of that agency testified before Granger's committee that 35.000.000 pounds had been disposed of In that manner since the War Production board decided that no further need existed for accumulat- ing wool. Dames under control until firemen pulled the clazir.g from the The storage TOOIT.S. were rot dam- aged and origin of the fire had not Engagement Told LONDON, Thursday, May Dally Mall said today that Kathleen Kennedy, 24-year-old daughter of former U. S. Ambas sador Joseph Kenedy. would soon be married to Lord Herllngton, heir of the Duks of Devonshire. Production board Is making avail-; General Honored able to the Dallas area. Quota as- signed to Baylor Is 25.000.000 Ox- ford units for May. Lawrence Piyr.c, hospital administrator, announced. A new quota will be assigned for June. Milk Ration Up LONDON. May weekly milk ration will be increased from two and a half pints per per- son to two quarts for a limited per- iod beginning May 7. the Ministry of Food announced today. Stocks of light fuel oils decreas- ed 259X00 barrels lo dur- ing the week, while supplies of heavy fuel oil were lower to nuunced. those on the home front are nsked to join their prayers wl'.h those of our fighting men." sold Onv. Coke R. S'.eunson in iroclamatlrm Ksued todny. naming 'D" as a day of prayer. Many churches '.he co-.mtry are planning to open their doors to who to enter. Business nes will observe the rUy by al- inp their employes to participate in a day of prayer. WITH THE AMERICANS AT 'iiOLLANDIA. Thursday. May 4 (fl_ The Silver Star has been awarded to Maj. Gen. Horace Ful- ler, commander of the'4lst division, for gallantry in leading the divi- sion to the swift capture of Hol- landia's cyclcps and Senlanl air- drome-5. The presentation by Lt. Gen. Rob- ert L. Eichclberger took place at an advanced bisc. with Brig. Gen. Clovits Byers and other high rank- ing officers present. Fourth Candidate For Governor Post AUSTIN, May 3 A 67 year-oM N'acogdoches farmer, Mar- tin Jonts, today became the fourth person to file notice of candidacj for Democratic candidate ns jav- cmor of Texas. His S300 filing fee, sent to Demo- cratic state executive committei secretary E. Simons, pui Jones' nar.-.e on a list with Coki R. Stevenson, the Ir.cumbcnt: A M. Ferguson of Howe ar.d W. 'J of Sherman. AUSTIN. May news of the soon Invasion Is an- Barkeley Private Struck by Auto Crossing the Pine street under- pass to reach the depot, a Camp Bar'xeity soldier. Pvt. Henry O. Schlotman, was struck by on automobile shortly after 10 p. m. last, night ar.d was taken to the camp station hospital ur.ccnscious. X-Rays we-re being taken at mid- night to ascertain the extent of his Tt-.r driver cf the car in- volved, a soldier, to pive as- sistance. Records of IMP police dr.- partment at midnight did not dis- close his identity. Treasury Seeks to Halt Bridge Close WASHINGTON, May 3 W) The Treasury sought tcday to pre- vent Sunday clor.lngs of Internation- al bridges at the Canadian, and Mexican borders threatened by a department interpretation of a su- preme rourt ruling on overtime pay for cus'.otiu inspectors. Herbert. Gaston. assistant secre- tary of the Treasury, appealed to operators of the structures to ccn- tinue the disputed pay to the in- spectors while legislation was souaht to shift the burden to the govern- ment. He appeared before Senate fin- ance subcommittee on a bill by Sen- ator Wagner (D-NY) which would clear up the controversy by ex- empt in? bridge, tunnel and ferry boat opeiatcrs from any changes. Tests Planned CHICAGO, May 3 Experi- ments using radio communica- tion in railroad operations wiil be cc-nductfd by the Burlinaton route in collaboration with Ihe Benrtif Radio division of Bendix Aviation corporation. Ralph Budd, Huiling- ton president, said today.   

From 1607 To The Present

Once upon a time newspapers were our main source of information. Now those old newspapers are a reliable source for hundreds of years of history and secrets of the past. Now you can search for people, places, and events without the hassle of sorting through mountains of papers!

Growing Every Second

Newspaper Archive is the world's largest online newspaper database featuring over 130 million newspaper pages. Plus our database expands by one newspaper page per second for a total of around 2.5 million pages per month! The value of your membership grows along with it.

Genealogy Made Simple

Those looking to find out more about their forefathers can empower their genealogy search with Newspaper Archive. Within our massive database, users can search ancestors' names for news stories and obituaries. We must understand our past to understand our future!

Choose the Membership Plan that is right for you!

Unlimited 6 Month

$99.95 (45% Savings!)

Unlimited page views for 6 months Learn More

Unlimited Monthly

$29.95

Unlimited page views for 1 month Learn More

Introductory

$9.95

25 page views for 1 month Learn More

Subscribe or Cancel Anytime by calling 888-845-2887

24 hours a day Monday-Saturday

Take advantage of our Introductory Membership offer and become a member for 1 month only for $9.95!

Your full introductory membership payment will be credited toward the cost of full membership any time you choose to upgrade!

Your Membership Includes:
  • 25 page views for 1 month
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a Monthly Membership only for $29.95
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!
Subscribe for a 6 Month Membership only for $99.95
Best Value! Save -45%
Your Membership Includes:
  • Unlimited Page Views
  • Access to Over 130 million Newspaper Pages
  • Ability to View, Save, and Print
  • Articles featuring over 100 million people
  • Full Access To All Content including 10 Foreign Countries
  • Weekly Search Alerts - We search for you!
  • & Many More Features!

What our Customers Say:

"It is amazing how easy and exciting it is to access all of this information! I found hundreds of articles about my relatives from Germany! Well worth the subscription!" - Michael S.

"I love this site. It's interesting to read articles about different family members. I've found articles as well as an obituary about an uncle who passed away before I was born, and another about a great aunt. It's great for helping with genealogy." - Patricia T.

"A great research tool. Allows me to view events and gives me incredible insight into the stories of the past." - Charles S.

Search Billions of Newspaper Articles 130 Million+ Pages and More Added Weekly!

Uncover 400+ Years
of Newspaper Archives
(1607 to today!)

Browse by Date

Research Newspaper Articles from 11 Countries
& all 50 U.S. States

Browse by Location

Explore 6,200+ Current &
Historical Newspaper Titles
and Counting!

Browse by Publication