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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: April 30, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - April 30, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                BOND BOX SCORF fear I Harbor April Quota f April Sbilene SUNDAY WITHOUV OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES'-Bj-ron VOL. LXIII, NO. 318. A TEXAS KEWSPWW ABILENE, TEXAS, SUNDAY MORNING, APRIL 30, 1944 -THIRTY-EIGHT PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Aitockted Prnt Vnlttt (V.P.) PRICK FIVE CENTS Hirohito Given Birthday Present, Heavy Losses Won't Accept Nomination GERMAN PRISONERS REMOVED FROM ANZIO prisoners, captured 'Jluring stalemate battling in the Anzio-Nettuno area of Italy, are loaded on landing craft at Anzio harbor. They are en route to a prison camp. (AP Wircphoto from Jitters Stepped UP 'Massive Raid Covers City LONDON, April 29 Two thousand U. S. warplanes smashing through box-like stacks of hund- .Jreds of German fighters tn the greatest daylight battle of the war cast ft torrent of explod- .Ing steel and Incendiaries on inva- slon-Jlltcry Berlin today .at.a cost ffl 63 bombers and H lighters. A U. S. communique tonight said that, 88 German planes were de- straoyed in 12-by the guns of the Hying Fortress and Libera- tor crews, 'and 15 by a powerful es- New Flight Manual Contains Words, Pictures for Fliers of "American Lightning and Mustang -lighters which also wrecked parked Nazi aircraft and shot up 21 locomotives. At midnight IhrfGerman ra- ,-f dio indicated that RAF night raiders were carrying the un- precedented assaults into lie I6th straight day by .warning that Allied planes were over the Rhenish-Weslphalian indus- trial area of Germany.'  nd a freshman n Rule high school. She has been n the hospilal (or the past weeks. The treatmcnV with peii- cillin was begun April 9 and con- tinued for 10 days. Both the hos- pilal staff and the girl's parents are delighted with Dorothy's re- sponse to the treatment. could tell R difference al- most at Mr. Dunn said. "She not able to turn herself In bed. had been so listless and pale and she had high fever. In three days [he fever was gone and there was a big difference tn her. Now she Is rosy and feels good and does not look like the same person." Doctors at the hospilal say they believe the penicillin has aided materially In the recovery from the disease which usually requires many weary monlhs in bed and much pain. Tokyo broadcast that the emperor himself was "deeply concerned with intensified aircraft production" presum- ably to replace Japan's dis- proportinate air losses from incessant American attacks. Gen. Douglas MacArthur an- nounced the seizure of the fourth Japanese flirfleld In the Hollandia area ot Dutch New Guinea. It was the Taml field, tile seventh on New Guinea taken by Allied troops within a week. American bombers hit airfields the enemy still holds the length of the Southwest and South Pacific front and lashed at three aerial bases in (he Central Pacliic Caro- lines. Far beyond four Nipponese pl.incs were- destroy- ed ailhe rt'adkt airdrome. Oth- er American bombers struck at Wewak's four by-passfd air- fields on Hollandla's opposite- flank. Three Japanese aircraft retaliated by raiding the cap- tured iMUpe field, between wak and One big Solomons-based bomber was lost striking nt the centra! Caroline fortress of Truk. But no were reported.In an. attack Ponape eastern outpost of Truk. seg- losses Knox Funeral Set Monday Afternoon WASHINGTON, April 59 FUneral services for Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox, who died of a heart attack yesterday, be nt Mount Pleasant Congregational church at 2 p. m. Monday. Burial will tc in Arlington na- tional cemetery with full military honors. Local Chiropractor Given State Office TAYLOR, K. Griffin April of Fort elected president of L. Worth was the Texas Bolivian Plotters All Under Arrest LA PAZ, Bolivia, April Enrique Baldivlcso. Bolivian foreign minister, said tonight all principals In an abortive revolutionary coup were under arrcsl but that the number was "not large." He gave no figures. Detection of the plot was an- nounced last night. What occurred, said Baldlvleso, was not a revolution but ft "revo- lutionary of which the auth- orities had been aware for some time. Earlier a broadcast statement by the Bolivian government said that "Interests who want to sell Bolivia's national wealth" were responsible for the plot. The stalcrr.cnt gave no names or details but presumably referred to supporters of Enrique Pcnaranda, whose government was overthrown last December. Proposes Execulive Sessions Be Open AUSTIN. April sity of Texas Regent H. H. Wcln- ert of Scguln today proposed that the board abolish the executive ses- sions that have preceded regular monthly meetings which have re- cently been thrown open to the press. Wclnert told the regents he In- ended to offer a resolution next month banning private sessions. "I would be pleased to do away with the executive com- nented Mrs. I. D. Falrchild, re- gent from Lufkin. Establishment ot ft University ot Texas press was voted unanimously and a budget of given for the balance of this fkcal year. ments 'of Kwantu.ng'army, Nip: pan's were, llirei thrusts in China's northern Honan province. Chinese counterattacks! In the outskirts of Mlhsleri, to lesser to. Loyang, 60 miles tc the northwest. 'Japanese were re ported driven from Huloa pass in another threat toward Loyang. Ti the west 0. southward drive of the invaders was halted, Chungking said. Further Improvement of the Al lied, situation It: Itidla was report cd by the southeast Asia communl que. "Liquidation of rcmalnin enemy strong points continued around the British base of Kohim: while 60 miles to the south Ailiei Spearheads spread through th Jungles like a fan around Imphn These are movements to locate an pin down the Invaders. "Laler we Intend fo ntlack and ileslroy the Mm. Lord Louis Mounlbiltcn's head- quarters said In answer a scries of questions from the Associated Tress. The statement said uneasiness felt In America over the southeast Asia situation was unjustified, that the Japanese offensive has not dis- located the Allied schedule nor hampered construction of the Ledo supply road to China, and even enemy success would not force withdrawal from north Burma nor hamper nir-supplled forces operat- ing behind NlpV-oncse lines in cen- Sce PACIFIC, Pf. 2. Col. 1 Soviets Kill JQO Germans, Sink 4 Ships LONDON Sunday, April The Soviet high command an- nounced early today that the Red army had killed a battalion of 800 o 1.000 Axis troops in repulsing minler-attacks southeast of Stanls- awow In former Poland yesterday, >nd Berlin said steadily arriving lusslan reinforcements and in- creasing assaults on that front in- dicated the Imminence.of another >lg Red army push toward the Carpathian mountain passes. .A Hungarian army communique old of violent Soviet attacks in he area of Kolomyja', southeast of Stnnislawow and northeast of the Tatar pass leading Into Hungarian- :ield Czechoslovakia. Berlin broadcast the Hungar- ian bulletin-and quoted mili- tary 'men .of, thft. saying' th'e'Russlans wert imss- Chiropractic Research society at the first session of a two-day meeting here today. Three-year directors named are Dr. Brooke Stephens, Lubboclt, and Dr. Jim Wolfe, Abilene. Two-year directors are Dr. Roy L. Emond, Austin, and Dr. W, B. Halstcad, Cleburne. Fifth Loan Drive Slogan Announced DALLAS, April 29-W- "Back the More Than Be- fore" will be the odicial slogan ol the Fifth War Loan, State Chair- man Nathan Adams of the War Fi nance Committee of Texas said to iday. A midnight .Soviet bulletin said the Red' forte had destroyed 100 supply-laden Apis trucks'-and shot down 23 German; planes ,in combat' and destroyed another on-the ground during Saturday .-in continuing attacks on'German jnlr- rields, troop .'coneeritratloris -and. communications: The regular commttnlriue Issued earlier told of the sinking of four more Axis -ships, three of them transports trying. to ..save the Ger- man-Romanian garrison from -be- sieged Sevastopol In the Crimea, "No essential changes'1 occurred .on the land front, that announcement said. suns of Hie .Soviet Black sea fleet sank the three transports totalling more than 11.000 tons, and a patrol launch, the bulletin said, making a total of 21 enemy vessels sunk in a week of combined sur- face and air attacks. An unspecified number of other ships were damaged, said the broad- cast-communique, recorded by the Soviet monitor, in engagements In the area of Khersonnes lighthouse, just west of Sevastopol, and at Kaiachya bay to the south. Germany's daily communique again told of furious Russian -at- tacks on the lower Dnestr river sector in Ihe Tighlna area, 120 miles northeast of the Oalati gap defense line protecting Ihe Ploest! oil fields, and said German troops "scored a full defensive success." Promotion Catches Up wifh Officer TEMPLE. April 29-My-Hls pro- motion to first lieutenant finally caught up with Cecil E. Klnerd of Swer-twatcr, pilot of the bomber "Wise today at McClos- scy General hospital. Lieutenant Kinerd was hospitalized here this week. Ihe Weather U. S. nf.PARTMRNT OF COMMTRCE WEATHER TURKAU ABII.F.NE AND VICINITY Mciltj fltttdy Sundiy. Mcndar rlovdj vU IhindtTthoK-cri. Freib t dfmlnUhfnr Sorter. EAST itj, MtndiT rlr.adr IhfliuJrfihftwfn In nnrlFi and itj Ssl. TTAAS Fully TF-MTERATIRTS Frl. HOrR frl. )........s: Illlh leu I s. m. SI SI. Ililh -nd Uw 90 ind ft. time dilt Int SfliuU- (Mi Sanitt Lonltkl MS. WITH 36th IN ITALY These three West Tcxans are on duty with the 36th Division in Italy. The above photograph was marie at a rest camp somewhere in Italy. Left to right, the men arc: .Sgt. Princ Moore, son o! Mr. and Mrs. Newt Moore, Old Glory; Sgt. Clarence (Cotton) TEichelman, son of Mr, and Sirs. C. F. Teichelman of Stamford, Route 2, and Sgt. John Elvin Carlton, son of Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Carltou, Tuxedo. The three men have been overseas one year.   

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