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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: April 24, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - April 24, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                 BOND BOX SCORE  Since Pearl Harbor $16,735,529.00 Hkpril Quotò '$ 231,700.00 April Sales    $ 92,936.00  VOL. LXIII, NO. 313.  MDRMWG  WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR-FOES WE SKETCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES”-Bvron    -  A TEXAS NEV/SPAPER  ABILENE, TEXAS, MONDAY MORNING, APRIL 24, 1944—EIGHT PAGES  Associated Press fAPJ United Press rVJ’.J  PRICE FIVE CENTS  Americans Move Into Hollandia  140,000 Helpless  ‘Allied Victory Road ’Open, King Reports  WASHINGTON, April 23—(AP) )-Adm. Ernesf J. King, Navy commander in chief, said tonight that Allied forces are now "fully en-*^ered" on the roads to victory and, fortified with units, power and experience are determined to travel "far and fast."  Both in Europe and the Pacific, he said in a report to Secretary of the Navy Knox, long roads still lie ahead, but—  “The encirclement of Germany is in sight.”  The war against Japan is in the American “offensive 4ktage” and progressing “increasingly well.”  King enumerated also these other long steps toward crushing the Axis in all parts of the world;  “The German submarine fleet has been reduced from a menace to a problem.  k “The German structure of satellite states is crumbling.  “The Balkans'are aflame with guerrilla war and other occiipied countries await only the signal.  “Numerical inferiorities” of  ADMIKAl, KING  Æreek Sailors Bring  on Crisis  # ALEXANDRIA. April 23—(^P)—A Greek crisis precipitated by demands of Army. Navy and Air Force officers for a new government was disclosed today in an Rnnouncement that three Greek warships whose ^crews had refused to obey orders ^were boarded and seized last night by Joyal Greek forces after a brief machine-gun and rifle battle.  British warships had kept the Greek vessels covered with their batteries since the crews refused to ¿obey orders directing them to sail on convoy and minesweeping duties.  The crisis was precipitated March 31 when a group of officers called on Emmanuel Tsouderos. then premier of the exiled government, de-Ipnandlng his resignation. They were arrested by the British, on the request of the Greek government, on the ground that they had exceeded their authority.  JStrike Still On  WINDSOR. Ont.. AprU 23—f;P)— A work“'stt>p‘page a.t the Ford Motor Company of Canada plant here remained in effect today for the fifth successive day. with no indi-Igpation of a settlqment of the dispute between the more than 14.000 production workers and the company.  the American forces in the Pacific during early phases of the war “have been reversed.”  “Our submarines and planes are cutting deeper and deeper into the vital Japanese shipping. Our fleets move in the Central Pacific unchallenged.”  Devoting the greater part of his 40,000-word report to the war against Japan, where, because of geographical factors, most naval action has been centered. King said the campaign there “may be regarded as having four stages:  *‘a) The defensive, when we engaged almost exclusive* ly'In prdteMing shore»«and our lines of communication from the encroachments of the enemj*.  “b) The defensive-offensive, during which, although our operations were chiefly defensive in character, we were able nevertheless to take certain offensive measures.  “(c) The offensive-defensive, covering the period immediately following our seizure of the initiative but during which we still had to use a large part of our forces to defend our recent gains.  “(d) The offensive, which began when our advance bases were no longer seriously threatened and we became able to attack the enemy at places of our own choosing.**  His report of the “defensive vStage" was principally a recounting of battle against overwhelming odds, with comparatively weak United States forces—reduced by the sneak attack on Pearl Harbor—fighting delaying actions to curtail the forward surge of the Japanese war machine; of submarines and torpedo boats waging war against strong Japanese units.  Ultimately our strength began to grow, he recounted, and the wholly defensive stage reached an end with the battle of the Coral sea— a major naval engagement fought entirely by carrier-based planes, and the first in naval history in , which surface ships did not exchange a shot.  Swinging into what King termed the "defensive - offensive" stage.  aps Made 5V Action  TARGETS IN RECORD WEEK AIR RAIDS ON EUROPE—25,000 tons of bombs during the week ending April 22. The Arrows from England and Italy point to cities and areas Russian bombing of Galati made it a three-way air attack on where Allied planes have dropped a record load of some Hitler’s festung Europa. (AP Wircphoto.)  Vienna Aircraft Areas Assaulted  AIXIED HEADQUARTERS. Naples, April 23—(JP) — American Fortress &nd Liberator bomb« svuniiig their role-In thtr tJ assault on Germany’s fortress Europe. carried out an attack In "great strength” today on vital Nazi aircraft factories and airdromes near Vienna. Austria.  Allied headquarters. In announcing the attacks, did not say whether any losses had been inciirred or whether fighter opposition had developed. (German broadcasts, how'-ever. told of embittered battle which raged over northern Croatia, and western Hungary.  The fighter escorted Portre.sses grounded yesterday by bad weather, hit the main target—the Weiner-Neustadt factory which with its subsidiary units is one of the most important producers of single-en-gined fighters in Europe.  Two large Liberator formation split up to rain explosives on the Schwechat aircraft factory. 10 miles southeast of Vienna, and Bad Vos-lau airdrome. 17 miles from Vienna.  Preliminary reports indicated that the bombers, shepherded by Lightnings and Thunderbolts, hit their targets heavily.  In the land fighting, heavy casualties were inflicted on an enemy patrol southeast of Penna Piedi-monte in the epslern sector and two German raiding parties w’ere repulsed with losses northeast of Orgogna  WASTE PAPER NO. 1 NEED  BY J. B. KRUEGER Associated Press War Editor Gen. Douglas MacArthur's avowed return to the Philippines has advanced 500 miles in a huge triphibian operation, announced today, in which American invasion forces stormed ashore at Hollandia and Aitape on New Guinea, world's second largest island.  Development of these two coastal sites would give the Allies bases closer to the Philippines than any they hold now, Hollandia being some 1,200 land miles from Davao, southern Philippine port.  General MacArtliur's Southwest Pacific headquarters announcement, from New Guinea, said the great sea-air-Iand operation iiad isolated and rendered strategically impotent 140,000 Japanese soldiers scattered over the 1,500 miles from the Solomons on the cast of Hollandia.  MacArtluir, from the dock of a cruiser sending its shells shoreward, supervised the landings whicli were carried out Saturday (Friday, UU. S. time) with slight casualties and without a ship lost.  One hundred fifty miles southeast of the prize objective of Hollandia. Americans  Waste paper is the No. 1 need of the nation’s war machine today, according to the War Production Board.  With cooperation of the Camp Barkelcy command the people of Abilene will be given opportunity Tuesday, Wed-iB re-    and Thursday of this week to give waste paper for  iolway-fwar-salvagA^purposes. ■  Army trück manned by soldiers will rake the town from one end to the other and pick up all waste paper prepared [or collection and placed in front of the homes and stores of the city.  The goal is 150.000 pounds.  The trucks will load the paper directly into railway freight cars provided by (he f^ighth Service Command. Here is the collection scliedule;  Tuesday, from South Fifth southward.  Wednesday, from South Fifth to Nortli Fifth. Thursday, from North Fifth northward.  Here, are the directions; All paper should be prepared in bundles with a cord or string in boxes not to cxcccd .50 pounds per bundle for convenient handling. Magazines should be bundled together, newspapers, sacks, etc.. together, cardboard boxes knocked flat and bundled together.  Soviets Capture Sevastopol Hi  LONDON. Monday, April 24 —  —A Crimean dispatch said yesterday the Red army -«had capt\ired a summit overlooking beseiged Se-vaiitopol, while the conviction grew in Moscow, London and even in Berlin that reforming Ru.sslan armies on the PolLsh-Romanian fronts .soon would launch anotlier offpi\-sive. perhaps coordinatrd with Al-hed lunges hi tlie we.si and south.  The Soviet high command, in one of lUs sliortpst bullf'tiJis in a yrar. again reported no Important changes on the rn.stern front. But both Ru.‘ii;ifln Hnci fJrrman fUs-patches noted Increased Soviet aerial activity of a Ivpe which n.«:unliy prf'crdr'^ rnairir cronnri operations, Tne nii.s.'ilahs were de-  OPPOSITION LACKING AS YANK FORCE TAKES BEACH  BY MURLIN SPENCER    Monte Kleban of San Antonio. Tex .  WITH AMERICAN TROOPS AT were among the first troops of this HOLLANDIA. April 22—' Delayed I— , unit, representing every .section nf (/P)—Out of the blackness of a tro- , the country and Hawan. which Large caliber Nazi guns | Pical night the loud speaker on the i stormed a.shore at Tannhmera)i.  dared striking concenlratlon.s, k' and oiher rear-1 The German-cn nvian t/'le«rani Berlin spokesnmi Nazi hiiih coniniai era! offen.sivo superliuninn effot fiier?..“  Since Mnnh 4 nnnniMK-e dthe k¡ apprf  fit Cieriiian  rcachcd Ailapc’s airdrome under cover of planes which controlled the air from the start.  The .Americans, in achieving the first reconquest of Dutch New Guijjea. leapfrogged 500 miles up  WASHINGTON, April 23. — (AP)—Attacks by "stronB" carrier task groups In the Ilol-landia area of New Guinea "are continuing“ in support of the Invasion forre, the Navy reported tonight.  The assault on Japanese airdromes and troop roncentra-lion.*? in the IloIIandia-llum-holdt bay region were launrhed Saturday to rover the landing operations, a Pncific fleet an-noiincemrnt sniii.  The aircr .siiepiirnJinR the bicgest the soulJiHC'  oprr;fH< annc>un<‘CMii»'ii’ iO\liiht tl'.n Ji  nahz  Hlrd  irrt.c n Renili demand icrman soi-  Htelv  shelled Allied traffic on highway six near Cassino and fired propaganda broadsides in the Eighth Army's Adriatic sector.  transport ship blared; "First wave i They met no ground opposition report to debarkation stations!” 'so far and had seen no Jaiiancse Shadowy figures climbed down i planes' even at a distance but he-the rope nets and from below only j tw^een the beachhead and thr ob-  seconds later could be heard the j jpctive_toward which another f«»r-  throaty roar of landing boat engines I midable force was pushini; from as American troops headed for Jap- ■ Humboldt bay—there are pfrl)i»p> anese-held shores.    i 14.000 of tlie enemy. They have hern  __________ ____________ALBUQUERQUE. N. M.. April Thus did the trained Army force here two years and the Americans  the Pacific fleet at the Battle of i 23__Chinese Air Force veterans i ^®S^n its assault on Tanahmerah : knew the Japanese could fuzht.  Chinese Training  M.. April  and this nunibn cned .=.00.000 whr lies are complete In 10 moiuii.s  Crimean tallio Rrd army has  By Tlie Associated Trevs.  The invasion of Iloiinndia. Diitrii New (iuinca. announced by (irn. ¡»ougias .Mar Arthur, moves up the left fJank »»f the lsland-to-islan<l I*;m ifl<- front approximately .*>00 miles.  From Iloliindia. tlial front line" runs like this; The Ad-llv islands to tiie St. Mat-  Drive Expects To Place China Out of Picture  By JAMES D. WHITE  WASHINGTON, AprU 23— m. — A big scale gamble to knock China out of the war and cut American bombers off from bases threatening the Japanese homeland is the most authoritatively supported Interpretation here of the Nipponese drive on the north China city of Chen-ghsien.  Oflinr suiiRestrd explanations, involve confiiciing factors which seem to cancel each other out. and it lonK lias been felt here that Japan Ls likf'lv to make one last great effort It* paraly/.e Cliina and eliminate the ea.st China bulge as an .Aliieti flanking base.  'I'lie reiifiy explai^ation of “foreign olxscivcrs’ in Chungking that thp Japanes** attack on Chengchow i.'i (Ic.siuntd iti rapture the big Ho-nati province wheaV crop is discounted hei'e.  Honan wiif-at will not ripen until the Miuifile of June. Japan's usual trihnifpic on looting (xpedltlons is t/i wajr intiil crojxs are harvested, th'-n iiuat'.f and carry off what i<HKl .Stores they can take with i them a.s \hi v retreat after dcstroy-  ing  Nor does It seem entirely liki'ly lo some observers here tiiat tiie aim of tiie Japanese drive is lo recapture the section nf the old Peiping-Hankow railway whirli lies between C'hcngchow and the Japanese outpost of Hsinyang north of  Midw’ay administered to the Jap- | have started training here anese the first decisive defeat the , bardiers and navigators.  See KING, Pg. 8. Col. 1  missions from Kirtland field.  - bom- i    By noon  flying 1 pushing ahead  .BOMBERS FROM NORTH, SOUTH CARRY .ASSAULT TO HITLER'S BATTERED LAND  LONDON, April 23—i^P)—Allied invasion planes in groat strength and of every caegory ripped Hitler’s to heavy bombers ripped Hitler’s battered European fortress from the ^fouth and west again today, w'hile ^3erman radio w'arnlngs late tonight Indicated that history’s greatest sustained aerial assault was continuing Its week-long fury throughout the night.  The offensive, culminating stroke jjfa a plan to destroy the German airforce, was declared at the same time in an unprecedented joint statement of the British air ministry and the United States Strategic Air Forces to have been a . success' although not yet a complete one.  Prom 500 to 750 Liberator and Flying Portresses skimmed the Alps from Italy for the daylight blows at Austria, heavily pounding aircraft centers of Welner-Neustadt ^d schwechat and the air field Bad Voslau, all near Vienna, while hundreds of lighter bombers and fighters hopped the channel irom Britain, blasting coastal antiinvasion defenses to keep rolling  most powerful of all aerial an-slaughts.  In Its night poundings, the RAF sent a force of 1.000 or more bombers into France and Germany for the third time within a W’eek, hlt-tinp the German rail and industrial cities of Düsseldorf and Brunswick. the German industrial citv of Mannheim and the French rail center of Laon, 90 miles northeast of Paris.  An all-day cross-channel offensive. possibly the biggest of the sort the Allies yet have attempted, continued today.    •  "Fven in the greatest days of the battle of Britain there was noth-Inff like it." one channel observer commented.  RAT? Bostons and Mitchell.^ and Soitfire fighter - bombers sun^le-mented the forays of American lit^ht and medium bombers and fighter.«?.  The oppasition was «o negligible that one groun of Soitfires ese.crt-ine Marauders broke awav looklne for eombot and swooned nnon a German '*5:-bont crew .sunbpthlne on  for the seventh straight day this | the Seine. They pumped the boat  full of canno shells. An Important railroad viaduct near Le Havre was hit twice directly by Canadian Spitfires figlUer-bombers.  Allied aircraft have flown more than 6.000 sorites in the past 24 hours, counting the thoiLsands of fighter and fighter bomber flights from Britain and Italy and have dropped well over 10,000 tons of bombs.  Altogether since April 15 the American Air Force and the RAF in raids from both Britain and Italy have flown around 30,00 sorties and loosed between 35,000 and 40,000 tons of explosives.  Dramatically releasing figures on the results of this and preceding air offensives In the joint statement. U. S. headquarters and the British air ministry said that Hitler’s aircraft production had nm behind his losses for the last three montiis. HLs dream of two years ago to quadruple Germany's fighter production this month has ended in a nightmarish "mere trickle" between factories and a weary front line force now able to put up real opposition only "o na favorable occasion," the statement said.  ule along a road toward the Hol-Inndia airdromes.  Only one American life was lost in getting the big as.sault force ashore. One soldier fell over tlie side during the debarkation and drowned.  The troops hit the beach at 7:08 a. m. with bayonets fixed, and within a few minutes they melted into the trees and underbrush fringing the shore. Not a single shot was fired by the Japanese—if any were there.  Capt. Byron r>aubenheyer of Gary. Ind.: Capt. Robert Corfman 1 of San Gabriel. Calif., and Lt. I  Road graders were the first velil-cles brought a.sliore fr ^ni lanciinc vessels. Swinging into 'hr attack as if they had born cirann'-r jungle beaches all tlieir livc.s bulldozer crews began knocking firjwn trees and clearing debris Wj’liin a couple of hours th.e bench wa.s ready to receive heavy stores     driven Inj^lde t>toii    iia and Romania    thias islands    lo the (iilherts.    Hankow.              and penetrafcd    df-unv to Ber-1    the urstern    -liirshalls, .Midway    The Chinese, when they retreat          lin in It.s .")00-nulr    i)wrland march    and thence    to Attu in the    ed In îî):î8, tore up and carried          from Kursk to the    l u.-k-Kowel sec-    1 Aleutians.        awav the    rails and ties of nearly          tor of old Poland        1 The distane    r from Altu to    200 mile.s    of thLs Une and plowed          The {ireseiit lull    i.'- the first since    j Hollandia is a    pproximately 4,.500    up the roadbed Japan would face          la.''t summer except    for a compara-    j statute miles.        i mont hs «if    construction work, using          tuflv cjuiet period    before the            : thou.sands    of tons of war-scarce          n;j.'..'ian.s leapcrl '    he i^Jiepr river    Chenkhsien a.v    ’he (»p-i.ri.i: thru.sî    steel, in at    ly attempt ’co rebuild this          in the Kiev .stHior    , of a    le to kr.i^k Clnna    iuic. The    military value of which          Russian fort r.-.    or, all se<’tors    out of the -.vaj    131.'-. ounr.-d were    in eni    :i mi^'ht be questionable.          wr.'i krd 26 Cieiina    n 'ank.s and de-    C'hungkin:: i cj.    lort-x t!î<' .Japanese    A iMird    po.'-,sir:ihty. that the Nip-          •i (>\ rd .')2 •ilar.r'-    .«a”ivda'-. '^airi    '-r.h-. fo(i,<-h u.T    f .srckin- íij¡l con-    P-i/! .‘f HKI    \ or trving to drive west-          the Ijrief broadcast    bulletin record-    trol nf flu' I’lf-p    um-Hanko'.v railv^ay    v.ai.1 to (•;.    it uie supply line to Rus-          cd hv the Soviet    rnonltor.    See IIOl.I.AXniA. I»g «. ( ol. ^    i sia    .         The Weather  Monday: Tuesdi EAST TE.XAS  Partly ch»m sincr cloudi  chance Monday;  ' -dine«« and wa Partly cloudy  TEMPEnATUBES Sat. UOUR Sun  name dat«  nitrht:  ...... i» m  9unset tonight:  Sunrls« this mornins: 6;58.  diK-  Warns Japan May Oppose U. S. Again  WASHINGTON, April Unle.ss effective mea.suri art t.i en to prevent the cancer '^f agii!' sive Japanese mlUtarisjii ging underground a.s it n;(i m t»f !-many. the next genrra'j'n tuav have to fight Japan acaii: I-Miincr Asba.ssador Joseph Clark    .‘.aid  tonight.  Grew, stationed in ’I'okv«. for many years, in a talk on the Columbia Broadcasting S\ :»m .*^ We the People program, a;><rted the showdown with Japan ' nm.st be complete and irrevocabi''  In the same broadcast Rear Admiral Dewitt Clinton Ramsey, chief of the bureau of naval ai-ronaunrs. said the Navy currently is knocking about 500 Jap phine.-^ "Ut <if liie .sky each month and lo.vinu in turn about 90 X X X." The number of enemy planes shot down, li** added, is exclusive of those accou ted for in aerial combat by the army au-forces and New ZealanH f'-rre^^ or those destroyed on the ground or by antl-alrcrait fire.  CITATION FOR BRAVERY 10 ABILENIAN FOR RESCUINO INJURED MAN ÂT ÂRAWE  I .SO.ViF."W’‘HERF7 IS AUSTRAIM. "One fellow mo April 23—A citation ior hraverv in rd smack into on rev jiiig a badlv woundrd man un- machint^ «un lani clrr n-iHchine «un fire beiMi uivon i \elled lor lielp--.'^ to S-Sci Jake Zabloi.dil 2[i. son of bleeding to death Mrs. Lera Zabloudil. 2997 Soutli ' raise uji on the 7th, Abilene. 'I>x    ^ toward him and  'I'hf .story WH.s Knm -o a report- fire would opeii o Cl \j: Zabloudils ok! f:iond, S-Sgt.^have to duck ai;a Theiron LewL'. 27, son of Mr. and , Mr.-^. O C. Lewi.«:. 1826 South 8th.  !'I'he two men. In the same troop at i Arawe, joined the Armv Nov. 18, i 1940.  i ‘Our troop was part of a small ! unit which attempted to take a sec-I tor that later required 15 tanks and a reinforced battalion to take.’’  said.  -We advanced several htmdred yard's under .sniper and mortar fire and were then pinneil ilown by machine gini fire. We laui m a mortar and artillery con<entration but it wasn’t effective: the Japs came out of their holes after the bombardment and 11 was jui>t as bad as ever.  "The man kepi velUnK for help and flnalJy Jake said he couldn’t stand it any longer. He inched up. slowly keeping his whole body, his head atul his hecis—to the ground and finally got lo the man. Jake would move up a little and the man would then drag himself b y holding on to Jake’s slei've.  ••Well, finally he got 1dm out of tile fire and into a position where others could help him. I still don’t kno\^ how lie did it."  The woiuided man. Lt ^•as the "most siiot up ma aw." Hr had 14 bullf See CITATION, Fg. 8.  said   

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