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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: April 9, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - April 9, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                BOND BOX SCORE Since Pearl Harbor 'April Quote Apiil Solci SUNDAY VOL. LXI1I, NO. 298. A TEXAS NIWSPAfffl WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO 1WENDS OR FOES WESKJflb-J YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT German Troops Hurled Across Czech Borders .LONDON, April 8 Two powerful Red armies sweeping ahead of a 230-mile front have hurled Axis troops back across the Hungarian- held Czecho-Slovakia border in the Carpathian mountains, stabbed 40 miles inside Rum- ania, and captured more than 480 villages in a swift chase of broken enemy, Moscow announced last night. A third Russian army, surging around all land sides of Odessa, captured 30 more localities, includ- ing Oildendoef, only eight miles northeast of the Black sea port, and completed the liquidation of the Y HFAnnifAPTC-ne M i A -i'n v remnants of five or six German dl- wiping .out enemy .troops and EilOrle--on vthp. Anylrv-: -i capturing said r the Sovie I 'Gains at Beachhead 'Scored by Americans ABILENE. TEXAS. SUNDAY MORNING, APRIL 9, 1S44 -THIRTY-TOUR PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS MP; FIVE CENTS Allies Wonder How Reds Move So Fast in Campaign Ri- ll'fu f.Ai I GAI.LACHKK LONDON. April 8-WV-AincrIcan and BrltlMi generals planning the invasion of Western Europe would like to know how the Russians arc able to move to fast against the Germans, and would like to be permitted by Moscow to study the problem first hand. The speed of the Russian advance Is as much a puzzle to American and British military Icaderr, as to the man In the street, and thus thjjy are lacking information which might aid the forthcoming assault on Hitler's western wall. The chief problem In western front preparations Is supply, and the undoubtedly the Germans like lo know how the Red army Is able (c maintain Us supply sjslem over hundreds of miles of devastated land lo keep pace Kith the swift advance of Us forces. The Russians have been reluctant to penult Allied military observers or newspapermen to go to the front, and Allied supply generals' who frankly admit they are puzzled, wish Moscow, permit observers free access to the eastern fighting sector so they could study the -Russian solution to the problem, "H Is a source of constant amazement how the RusMtms are able to go nn week after Bald one Ameilcan general, who has handled supplies In Africa, Italy as well as England. "It Is something we would like to be able to study at first hand." K Is significant that the Allies were stymied in the supply race In February, 1943, by the mud In Tunisia and this winter by the mud In Italy, while the Russians have been able to move through the mud of the Ukraine without great difficulty. It Is significant, too, that the Germans, whose military efficiency Is considered the best In the world, bogged down In Russia's, mud. One answer lo Russia's supply sutcesses Is tht low military scales I he Russians have worked out (or their army In other words, (he number of tons per daj- needed lo supply a division The German scale Is estimated at an average of 250 Ions per day, I he Russian scale Is believed at Irast this low, and perhaps lower. WSlt the cliallBe three-star But wlilJc thc Russians can economize on foodstuffs ar.d Th.  (hey stand now tht en? o'f 1 of nmrt'te mSitaJS wm ft point of only a peacetime standing army. 10 for material" mUSl Baltl ln the five >cars ThV poS free return of the Hangoe district to Finland.' AN AMERICAN PILOT JiEETS HIS BODYGUARD: Lt. E. K. FluiK of Detroit; Mich., liaison pilot, who terries wounded from the lines (o base hospitals in Burma, is greeted on his rcliirn by Ilirce Kachin natives who carry his rifle, an um- brella to shield him from the sun and native weapons to protect against lurking Japs> (AP Wirephoulo.) By LEONARD M Associated Press M'ar Edlior The heaviest nijht raid on Tnilr cmphasizmg American.aerial domi- nance over one-powerful Japanese bases in the Pacific, was reported today as a sharply contradictory picture of the war In India was drawn Saturday by Allied com- muniques ?nd thr; Tokyo radio. Dublon island, in Ihe center of the heavily fortified Truk atoll was left blazing and blanketed by "'Slit by Admiral William P. Halsey's raiders from Ihe South Pacific. It was the 14th blow In a little more Ihan a week at the once feared Central Caro- lines stronghold, by-passed ten days ago in the damaging carrier strike al Palau, Yap and other eastern Caroline Islands. In announcing the raid today Genera! Douglas .XfacArlhur added 13 more Japa- nese planes lo Ihc toll sho; rioa-n In the heaviest day raid on Truk. last Sunday. That makes the day's toll 38. Southwest Pacific bombers continued (heir westward swing, smashing al the Kal Islands, southwest or New r.nincn. while (lie almost useless airdromes at Wewak, Xcw Guinea, and Ra- baul. New Ireland, were ajain tattered. Five planes were de- stroyed on the srourfrl In these strikes. Tokyo asserted the important (own of Kohlma In Eastern India was captured by'Japanese troops Thursday. The Allied communique said no Important engagement had been fought near Kohlma. British commanders conceded the Invading column was continuing pressure of a "prowling" nzttirc in that area. Japanese cap'.urc ot Kohlma would cut oil British troops defending Imphal, SO miles to the south, from their railhead. And It would place the invading column withfn striking distance of the Bc'n- galsssam railway which carries all supplies for China and Allied ar- mies in North Burma. Elsewhere In the lighting around the plains of Imprul. the Allied positions improved markedly. Lord Louis Mountbatten reported the Japanese were driven from "one Important feature" in the hills and the Allied positions were otherwise Improved. In Southwest Burma lhe British resumed their slow advance toward the port ot Akyab, capturing a vil- lage southwest of Buthedaung. Chinese and Burmese drove down on Myltkylin, Nipponese North Burma base, from tiro directions while a flying column of Chimlwils continued lo knife, the Jap.inrsc fn Hie back. As- sociated Piess War Correspond- ent Frank Martin reported Ihc air commandos have In- fliclcil c.israllics In a month of roving guerilla light- ing. Tokyo radii said formations of around 20 American planes raided Hainan Islanri off the South China coast and aHackcd Truk tn the Centr.il Caroline Islands Thursday. A U. S. communique from Chung- king saltl two Jarar.rsc air bases on the South China coast were bombed Thursday while four Japa- nese planes were shot down anrl two freighters damaged tn n sweep over the Tonkin gulf Friday. Ponapc In the Ea.sScm Carolines was bombed by Army Mitchells Thursday. Only moderate anti- aircraft fire w.is encountered. Croft-Roosevelt Movement Started DALLAS. April 8 group of Democrats meeting here today crginlzcd a "Draft Roosevelt" move- ment tor the State of Texas and sent resolutions to every pricinct cteclion Judge in the state. Joe C. Luther, president of the Young Democrat? Club of Dallas said the movement will be organized along military lines, with a captain for each prccinc'. In Dal- las county.-Luther was appoint- ed (o organize a statewide Gaines Goes Dry r.rjBBOCK. April 8 ..fl-Com- plete returns fro.-n 12 of 15 boxes in Gaines cohnty's toc.il option election today showed 901 votes for the and 746 for the wets. The county went wet in 19SO and wets won In four elections previous to today'i balloting. The Weather V. s. nr.rARTMf.yT or COMMERCE and rondnattf Frtih In flAST 1 ri-iod) Ln noilhntU Uon, lnd fresh to .Sen. ttendf ant por- w.ih In pftrllon. fivnllnatit trirm. ind >Ier.dij-, n trm Son- cnrlfr In pmhandlr and Mondiv. F tn Kindi TFMrr.JMTlRI.S li- no; R F i Sal. AM Kl tl H s 11 t Frl. 71 11 f-H Ifl 11 It rilv S S3. Hlxh Jime Int itn f S7. lul nithl: Jt.Ql. Sanrlit Svnitt S.Of, 59 Planes Lost In Raids Over Nazi Territory LONDON, April 8 American aerial fleets to- taling about planes surg- ed over Germany today, with U. S. heavy bombers ripping Iwo already-battered aircraft plants at Brunswick and five airdromes north of the Ruhr while American fighters shot down 92 German planes and destroyed and damaged many others on the ground. From nil the day's operations, which included, an. attack on the Belgian rail center of Hasselt and sweeps by Thunderbolts, and Light- nings against airdromes in the Frankfurt area, 31 U. s. bombers and 25 fighters are missing, mi Army communique said. No fighter opposition.was encoun- tered over the airdromes, as .the Gcrro.an.ajr its Interceptors' desperate defense of the'Brunswick targets, wh'ere Ihe war.bulletin ssld Ihc U. 4- fifing Fortresses arid- Liberators' bombed tlielr objectives "visually with good results." Bitter air battles raged over Brunswick and along the return route. Escorting American fighters there destroyed 81 enemy aircraft Thirty of the missing bombers were lost, in the Brunswick operation. No tabulation yd has been made nn (he number of Ger- man alreratl fo fall before the guns of the heavy bombers. Nearly American Flying Fortresses, Mbcralors anil Med- ium Marauders participated in the widespread allaclis. Fierce battles with German In- terceptors were fought by the For- tresses and Liberators spearing to within 110 miles ot Berlin to rain explosives on Brunswick's already- damaged factories for fighter air- craft. The German radio asserted the Americans suffered "one of their heaviest and that llic bombers litre Iryliij lo at- tack Berlin. The rest of Ibc .fleet of 500 lo 750 four-cnglned bombers -belted German fighter fields In North- western Germany. Some 500 Medium Marauders and Thunderbolt fighter-bombers team- ed up for the first time to strike Ihe Belgian rail center of Hasselt. Important junction on the Anlwerp- Maastrlcht-Aachen line, and other Thunderbolts escorted Marauders hitting the Coxytlc ulrtield on the Belgian coast. All the mediums re- turned. With their Ujlitnlng. Mustang and Thunderbolt the Amer- ican attack C.rt.t; probably totaled about planes. APRIL PLAN IS 10 DRAFT YOUNGER MEN EN MASSE WASHINGTON, April 8 (AP) _ Selective Service headquarters, taking drastic steps to hasten the delivery young men to the armed services, today ordered postpone merit of the drafting of all men 26 and over who are in war- important jobs, even those already ordered to report for induction. Draft Director Lewis B. Hershey announced the ac- tion after being told by the army and Navy that they want young men so badly they are willing for draft boards to fail to deliver their quotas of older registrants, Apparenlly the plan Is to send young men Into the Army and Navy almost en masse during April. In- formed officials said it meant the current government program of en- dorsing deferments for certain key men under 26 much be speeded up II It is to be In time. An official ot the Office of War Information said a list will be pro- vided In a day or two to gujde dratt boards tn the determent the 'list- will -be' sub- stantially'that to be the.. .Inters ge ncy e" h'ea'd ed by. Manpower Chairman Paul V McNult. The postponement of older nun starts as soon 'us local boards can slop I heir machinery and speed up the new system. This may (he middle of nest week In some localities, draft officers salil. A man scheduled to be Inducted Monday or Tuesday, for example, will have no legal recourse If his induc- tion tikes place on schedule. The delay will list until process- Ing of men under 26 has been "sub- stantially Hershey said. How long that will be depends on conditions In each state, and offi- cers here salt! any national esti- mate was Impossible. In one stale, See DRAFF, Faft i. Col. 4 Brunswick Defense One of Most Bitter A U. S. LIBERATOR BOMBER BASE IN ENGLAND. April '-German fighters which have been held in reserve lor the delcnse of only thc most vital oi targets tried desperately to break up Liberator formations ntt.icklng Brunswick's war lactories today, returning crew- men said. The Germans dived madly at the Liberators 15 abreast in the bricl but furious air battle remin- iscent of thc greet Amcrlcnn-Ocr- mnn clash over Brunswick on Jan. 11. they said. Although other bombers went on to lay explosives on hull a dozen oiher targets inslrie Germany, thc pul up Ihe fighters only over Brunswick. 50 to 60 May Be Cut Back Here Under New Plan Fllty or sixty armed forces-bound Taylor county selectees may be cut back from April Induction or pre- Inductlon examinations, Clint Ste- wart, cleric of the local board No 3 revealed yesterday. Although local draft boards had not been advised of Maj. Gen. Lewis B. Hershey's order halting Induc- tion of all men rnore than 26-yWrs- old who are'making.a contribution to fssenlla! aBrlcullureVwa'r'produc- tion or war supporting activities Stewart said, board No. 2's April draft 50 and 60 of men over 26 who are how listed in 2-A or 2-B. A clerk for board No. Y; satd that board would not be affected by tha order as H has no additional calls lor April. Ohioan Becomes First War Ace LONDON. April _ Capt. Don S. Gculile's claim of five planes destroyed on thc ground on April 5 was confirmed today while he was blasting three more Nazi planes out of the sky lo nm his bag to 30, and the P qua, o.. Mustang pilot became tile first American ace of this war formally recognized as having broken Sapl. Eddie Rickenbacker'j Worid War record. Thc confirmations brought his' official total to 27 of which seven were destroyed on the ground and 20 In the air. The three destroyed today are still to be formally con- firmed. Rlcltenbackcr destroyed 26 enemy aircraft In thc last war, all in air combat, a mark which was equalled by Uo Marine filers In tht Pacific I" this war. Gentile, a 23-year-old Mustang pilot, got his five grounded planea on April 5 In a sweep over Berlin. Collision Rates Ordered Increased AUSTIN. April 8 IS per cent Increase was ordered today !n the general rale level for collision premiums on private passenger cars and trucks, Stale Casualty Insur- ance Commissioner J. P. Olbbs an- nounced. .Gibbs said the Increase which becomes effective I. 1341, was due to adverse experience caused from an Increase In accidents ar.d the sharp rise In repair costs. Formers Directed To See Price Paid DALLAS, April 8 J. Cap- pieman, regional direc- tor of Ihe War Food administration, today toid farmers in thc southwest region to get In touch with nuthor- Jjcd egg dealers In their state If they are receiving less than 26 a for interacted eggs. All purchased by Ihe dcafers will be bought by the WFA a'. 29 cents a dozen. _______, _ B nRITISII SEAMAN RKSCUED IN ATLANTIC: U. S. Coast guardsmen aboard a culler patroling thc Norlli Atlantic s lipping lanes liffa British seaman over lhc side in a slrct- slier after a life boat crew rescued him and Iwo comrades, llieir vessel had radioed for help after it had hccu torpedoed hy a German submarine. One of (lie oflicr Britons saved is in life boat (AP Wircphoto From Coast Guard.) Summerish Weather Forecast for Easter The weatherman last night pre- dicted near summer weather for Abilene's Easter Sunday. Partly cloudy and continued warm was forecast for day. The temperature yesterday hit t seasonal high of S3 degress.   

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