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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - April 2, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                BOND BOX SCORE Since Pearl Harbor quota March f fie Abilene 'SUNDAY Wf OR WITH OFFENSE TO OR FOES WE SKETCH YOUR EXACTLY AS IT LXIH, NO. 291. A TEXAS 2-ii, Food rmnfci stoied in tanki sunk in SWITZERLAND I---V" ABILENE, TEXAS.SUNDAY MORNING, APRIL 2, 1944 PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS Anxtnled Prest lAf) UnlM IV.P.) PRICE VIVE CENTS Captain Declares Ethics Creating All Wars KEXNE1H I. fllXON WITH THE AEP IN 'SARDJKIA. March 23 yzs a .sudden silence In the little room wlier? the airmen sat. a moment no one looked at the tall, tairhalrcd captain who had sujAen. someone cleared throat. 'Huv is lhal again he asked. "I said that as long as ive live under our prevent code of etlilcs and virtues that 'there'll always be war, and I 'said lhat am not' convinced hut lhat is a pretty food ihinr" Again the pi- lot1! and bomb- ardiers sat still (or a mcmetit. it was hard to be- lieve their cars H Riving beenVi s h.o eked Into stunned speech- UNKIITH L DIXON essncss for that long, (hey were obviously deciding to hear the guy out before unleashing their wrath. Besides, he was ol ihcm, had been through the nilll them. You cculd almost hear the wheels of their mir.As turning as Ihe fire crackled In the stillness. how do you mean ime of them ashed. "1 knotf places where you'd be lynched for a crack s 'Probably so." the captain shrus- gcrt. -But I'm tired of all this point- less stuff of hellish war Is while a war is going en, and we're going to prevail another war and so on, when all Ihe time war brings out all the characteristics we aie taught from childhood are vitiuji. Without war those virtues would die out. so It must follow that cither these virtues are wrong or else -.-Mr Is a pretty good thins after all.' What virtues does war someone asked. "Couraje Is Iht blond raptaln replied. "At home in school, In church, vt'rr lauffrt from kids lhx( ocilraje h a virtue, a wonderful ihlnt, dU- counting all the substitutes lor war you find in anil In i dally slrucitlt rxlslfiicf war Is a dual mass nf courage, the one that Rives jrcat numhcrs of ntf n a chance to prnvt thrir physi- cal cnurage at least." He stared In the lire for a min- ute then continued: "Unselfkhnus, or rather self- lessness, Is another; the willingness to lay down one's life fcr a Irlenrt or for a cause. Patriotism h an- other; willingness In the linnl an- alysis to lav down one's life for one's country. leadership and faith Lu UadersU.ri." Once silence hung over the room. It was broken by an obvi- ously bitter youih who had spent considerable lime on the front. I think I could make you change your mind about war being a grxxt thing." He said harshly. "Nor with words, 1 mean, but I think ycu'd change yo-ir mind. There Is nothing good about dead kids lying btvlde ihe road, nr guys 1-111 all 10 pieces." His voice trailed auay. "If you inejn it ironlfl brine the isar honJf to replied the capUJn, "I don'l tlihik ncms4iy. My brolhtr was killed In a J'-3S Ihe olhrr day. Mj olher brolhpr it ovtf here, too, and he's likely lo jel It. I've last most of my lirst friends out of this group lh.il way. 1 nus' let it (no. Xo, I don't (lilnk that would chance my mind." 'It's our standard ot virtues. If courage and chivalry and patriot- ism and leadership and faith In a cause or a ccuntry are virlue-s, worthy ol dying for, then war partially a thing, lor It keeps them alive and active. If not worth dying for then war if certainly a terrible thing. KM ths only May we'll stop It Ls revlie your standard of virtues." "You're the bitter youth said sltwly. -You're wrong. I cr.n't lei] yon exactly where, but your iCBSoning Is haywire somehow. War Is wrong. Thai's all I know. I don't I know about virtues." "Well, I know (here Is no virtue In staying up all night listening in j'ou guys s'iien you won't settle another captala said, rising end stretching. going to hit the sack. We've got another damned early mission in ihe (nomine." NEUTRAL ARKA in (lie northern lip of nriilra! Switzerland was a'j- bombed by Americans yesterday. This inaji was made when it was feared Swit- zerland might become a German path to France. It sbows possible Nazi routes and indi- cates Swiss defense plans, feds But 20 Miles of Odessa OVERRUN 200 VILLAGES FLEEING NAZIS LONDON, April 1 The Red army smashed to within 20 miles of Odessa today, swiftly 'overrunning nearly 200 villages on a great arc that imperilled Black sea port lu pursuit of retrcallng Axis troops "suffering tremendous loss- Moscow announced tonight. 1 In the northwest the Russians loughl their nay into Khotin to the last German route I of the Kamenets-Podolsfc pock- et above the Middle Dnieper, and in Besarabia advanced up to 17 rniles on a 50-mile, front toward the key cities of Gfehlnev and Tiraspol. throUgh wh'.cti run the .last NazJ ijfail 'escape routes from Odessa in- wo Rumania. A Berlin broadcast also said Sovitl spearheads had troktn through, (o Ihc Tatar pass lead- Inj through th'e Carpathian A mountains into lorrntr Ctecho- Slovakia, now Hungary. than 100 localities, said the dally bulletin, recorded by (lie Soviet Monitor. On the northwest they look TroiLskaya, 80 miles from Odes- fa and 63 northeast of Tir- aspol, through which runs the last German escape routes into Ruman- MBM At Worth Park North elec- sparked- an' 'otherwise, drab election of trustees irijTaylor coun- ty. At North Park Tommy Grant and Jess Wood, with 41 votes each, won the two places on the ticket. Out- going Fd Francis ?nd J. W. Comp- tpn got 39 and 36 respectively. Report Abilene Private Missing In Italian Area Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Coimally route 2, residing on the Potosl road, e informed Saturday by the 5Var department that their son, He Wendell Cormally, has been missing In action in Italy since Feb. 9. Private First' Class Counally was a member of.tlie division arid had been since leaving Abilene in the fall of 1941 as a member of a local National, guard de- tachmeril. Other members of his. family are three brothers, Jim, living at home; Charles, of Sweetwatcr; Richard, of Arson, and a sister residing in Michigan, Connally was unmarried. Swiss City Accidentally Hit by American Bombers OFFICERS CONTINUE SEARCH FOR SEVEN NAZI PRISONERS OS Otesa, n Way. That, gain. V, lorttcEs city captured Frl- represented a H-mile On the northeast the Russians were declared to have seized Tash- ino and Bluuicnfeld, 28. miles from Odessa, and on the north the hard- Jtiitting Red nrmy tank crews' rolled through ficrbka, n rail station 23 miles from the Black sea port. Swarms o! motorized Russian in- fantrymen, tanks and Stormovik fighters attacking on the eastern northern side of Odessa wsre ithln 38 and 50 miles of the Black tea, respectively, ripping at '.on? columns of German and Rumanian troops retreating in contusion and possible entrapment .because ol the southward of Russian troops Bessarabia in the west. The Russians hitting on the east- ern side of thf arc captured more Risky Business Refusing lo Buy Tn the county election James E. Freeman receiv- ed 93 votes in the North Park torn. At Merkei Nathan Wood, George Woodrum and Oren Robertson were named school trustees without op- position. Only 11 voi.es were cast in the slow election. G. H. Blackburn was returned as trustee in the Elmdale election with 11 of the 29 votes cast. Frank An- tillcy received eight and Clarence Hobbs. also formerly In office; got three. James A. led the ticket In Potosi election i 25 voles. Eu- Bene Down polled J.> and Riley Mill- er 13. In tmconlcsted ticket at Plea- sant Hill. Lee Baker was rctunuii as trustee and Archie Wilson was chos- en as a trustee. Says Nazi Capital Be Moved If a man offers to sell you z nlnt cf It might' be wise to buy A bloody soldier last night told police lie had been slashed by a civilian when he refused to buy a pint of whisky from the man. The soldier said the man. who escaped arrest, offered the pint tor sale and then grew angry when the soldier thought the price was too high. The soldier was taken to Camp Barkeley station hospital! Dean Appointed ......._ .._..... WASHINGTON. April 1-liP, III the Wylie common school dis- Secretary of State Hull announced trict A. -Muston. was elected i today _that Dean Mildred Thomp Weary peace ofticers and Army personnel last night continued to comb a wide West Central Texas area but no trace was found of the seven of 12 Camp Barkeley German prisoners of war, who tunneled their way to freedom from the Camp Barkeley sUickade Tuesday night. Only five of the 12 escapes had been apprehended last Capt. Ed.-Posey of the Abilene state high- way rjalrol district fald. Yesterday prisoners 'twice when thev tafcen 'to BalUngcr, Posey declared. The search last night centered around the Paint Rock (uea. where the slate police department had set up a two-way radio lo direct officers. Several Texas Hangers, FBI (igenls and highway patrolmen were continuing to. beat the brush south of Camp Barkeley but Ihe Wln- :ers area search was slackened at 0 a.m. Saturday after an ell night hunt. Two of Ihe prisoners were cap- tured near Winters early Friday Hopes of early capture were dashed almost after the first ar- rest. The prisoners, who' labor- iously tunneled under the slockade n several months, were well pre- pared for their escape from the States. All had finely drawn, tissue paper inaus. ?howing the country In bold relief. Highways, railroads, towns nnd even names of principal ranches, u-er- lettered on Ihe trac- ings. Food also In quantity, one comity trustee while H. -G. Hender- son and O. Dawsoii were re- son of Vassar college has been ap- pointed a member of the American elected without opoosition. Twenty- delegation to collaborate with the elec- 'conference of allied ministers of four votes were cast tn the tlon. [education in London. J. M. Hamilton received fix votes. NEW YORK. April 1-lAV-Dr. Ean, BHn, ,ive ami vimaa Nicholas Murray Butler, president nne Hill ejection. ot Columbia vvmvoisity, said today in an Inlen-tew on the eve of his fc62nd birthday that the capital ot "postwar Germany should be tc-! moved from Prussian Berlin and j relocated at Dresden or Frankfort.; He also recommended that Ger- many be setup as a "federation of the United States." Ambassador Dies WASHINGTON. April 1-fcn _ Manuel dc Freyre Y Santandcr. Peruvian ambassador to the United States and dean of the Washing- ton diplomatic corps, died today. Action Completed WASHINGTON. April Th? Senate completed Congressional action today on appropriations for the Treasury and the -Post Office Hamlin Trustees Are Re-Elected HAMLIN, April t In a listless election here today Fred Carpenter and Holly Toler were re- turned as trustees of the Hamlin independent Tchool district and Ed- die Jay was installed on the bwid lor his first term. A. B. Carllon KM elected county tr'iitce. L. H. McBridc president of ihe Hamlin board. Other numbers arc civilian officer reveals, From the captured men was taken packs con- aining food for at least ten days, Landy, chevvin? and Inciden- tals. One the Germans also wax carrying a pup tent, the officer said. The tunnel through which the men left Jhe stockade, was about eight feet underground. had been built from under a hutment in the and one outside the stockade. 1sflt.lir Missing Since March 15 Raid 1st. Lt. Bert B. Miller. Abileiilan who was pilot of a B-24 bomber lias been missing In action over Ger- many since -March 15, his former Margam Ale.vnnder. was in- formed by the War department Saturday, morning. Lieutenant Miller, who called Don by most of his irietids and family, was n son of Mr. and Mrs. Bert r o! Portland, Ore., who j resided In Abilene milil last June. Cancel Japs On Hollandia In Big Raids Bvv LEONARD M1LUMAN' Associated Press War Editor In coordinated blows to pro- tect powerful sea forces strik- ing at the fortress of Palau, American bombecs have wip- ed t'A'O.-thircJs.-of Japan's "air povver at Holiandia, New made six neu- tralizing raids on Truk in three days while destroyer; steamed to within 400 miles of Thlk lo rake the In a dispatch Bad Weather Officially Blamed for Big Damage LONDON, April liberators bombed industrial and communications targets deep in Southwest Germany today nnd some ol tbcir mmincr accidentally dropped incendiaries on (lie border cily of Scliaffbattscn in neutral Switzerland, causing 3fi to 50 deaths and heavy damage. A U. S. Army communique in reporting on the day's eralions announced Dial some bombs had hit Swiss territory, blaming navigational difficulties induced by bad weather. U did not further identify which -the dentai bombardment, occurred nor list the Ge'rmdn targets of the fighter-escorted Liber- ators, Thomas F. Hawkins, Assocl.ilrd marangi islands with gunfire. South Pacific Liberator hcavv bombers, attacking Truk Tliur.tdny in the second consecutive clav of raids' on the strong-point by Solo- mons-based aircraft, sliol down 11 planes. Scvrnly-one planes were destroyed In Friday's mid-on the big Holiandia b.ise. General Mac- Arthur announced today. Ifollnn- dia Is on the southern flank of Ihc sea road to the Palau islands, which block the approaches to the Philip- pines. He a of Abilene Departmntls for the fiscal year be- mere ginning July 1. providing 897 for the Treasury and 209.272 for the Post Office. J. Uhben, A. Spencer and Craig H- heavily damaged by American nav.il j guns. This was the closest warship approach lo vaunted Truk carrier force attacked the base Feb. 16-17. The Kjj hnnibliijr allack See PACIFIC, Pf. 9. Cnl. I After 57 Days at .MERKEL SOLDIER HAS SEEN ENOUGH OF IIALY D. MILLER high school and was employed In the circulation department of the Abilene Reporter-News before vol- unteering for Army sen-ice as a private. Dec. S. 1911. five flays be bore Pearl Harbor. Mrs. Miller is a daughter ot the Rev. and Mrs. James Alexander anri she resided with them at 2025 Succumbs Here from the Swiss city which Is near :.ake Constance on the German frontier, definitely declared that Schaffbauseri was hit and said at least 36 persona were killed and 150 Injured. A SwlM communique saw 30 American planes participated In the accidental bombing of Sclnfl- ThirU-cn bombers nnd four JlKht- ers failed to return from the oper- ations, which Included stratlng at- tacks on enemy airfields by Ihe e.s- cor'lng American fighters. Late-Si Siviss plnccrl Ihc ilratli toll it 50. vtilh oliitrs hurird under Hit rrpnrls aho said Ibp bonibhuc h.id mused considerable dam- ace In the city. "Due to difficulties of uavlsation In bar] weather snme fell on i territory hy mistake." the 0.1 i Srn SWISS BOMBS. H, 5 E. W. (Llge) Turner, 10, an Abi- lene Jeweler for tl died yes- terday at p. m. in a hos- pital after being stricken vlth ft heart attack nt his home earlier la the day. Mr. Turner's home was nt North Wi and Hickory. A native of Kansas, Mr. Turner was born at Lynn coun- ty, Sept. 1. 1873. He came to Abi- lene 47 years ago to open a. jewelry Ilrm and was ftlll interested In that work at the time of his deftth. He is survived by his wife, one daughter. Mrs. John B. Griflin of Abilene: two sons, E. W. Turner Jr., of Waco and Pete R. Turner of '.'is United Sta'cs Navy and one broth- er. Ed U Turner of Pittsburgh, Ptnn. Funeral arrangements will an- nounced from Elliott's funeral home. Modifying Original Demands, Moscow Reported WILLING 10 FOREGO MING FINNISH AREAS STOCKHOLM, Sunday, April IJTi understood In rr. liable quarters today to hnve ex- pressed a wlllinctif.v to allow Fin- land to retain the penin- sula and the ells of Vltpuri in a modification of ttv Soviet armistice terms handed to Dr. Juho K. Paaji- klil. of Finland. Dr. Paasikivi. who has been in since was re- n j ported to have otcaincd Ihe modi- "'ticadoas after Finland rejected the crizinal Russian trrnis. The Finnish parliament will mrct Szt. l-coitard Lewis, veteran; doughboy of the 36th Infantry di- vision and son of Mrs. Mardle Lewis. Merkel. Is back home "from the blood) battle of Italy and frankly, have any burning desire to return to "Sunny Italy." Scntf.yl Lewis and hh wife, tnrmer Lillian Kstoli of Merkel. ,tnd their son, almost two Tears ild. arc living tem- porarily at T.aVcslrft ramp, Abi- line. The scrieant participated in the lantiints at Saicrr.o JV.ri In 57 days in front line action. "I was I hit thrrc liiuts by enemy fire but; wasn't a taKrt or f shell fraBincnt broke the skin." the tsrscanl ;afd. Sergeant Lewis left Italy in Janu- ary nnd arrived Ir. Abilene early Thursday on a 15-day furlough. He was sent back to (he states because .of recurrent attacks of asthma. His 'part in the from now on Is ex- pected to be on a Ifel'.eJ service basis, but the sergeant believes In that capr.citi' he can still render assistance lo the war et-1 SGT. LEONARD LEWIS fort. "Don't let anybody Vld you that the Germans are not good the sirgejnt said, aidlnjr, "but Ihcj're it least humane on the "No, I didn't kill any Germans! i that, i know of. but I r.lcl toss Ms ol hind eipnadp.- where they were." screeaiU had a telescope site on his rifle but never I'.ad a chance to use it. he said rather dejected- ly. When he left his company, the former Swcetaater National Guard company of the H2d Infantry regi- ment, there had been only six casualties. Sfrji-ant l< rnnvinrert of one stortes Ahtvul "Sunny tialy" are purp propa- [inila. "Ewcjit fir Ihe lirsl (hrfp of tiir It rainrd In Italy." the scmfjnl said. Sergeant Lctvls sprnt 15 at the front when the beach- head wa.5 established ar.ri the next time up there rlavs. He has been on active duly since the 36th was mobilized In Novem- ber. 1940. He has two brothers in service-- Mchln. ffrjeanl en duly whh ih' nir in India, and Clyde, rookie a< Ft. Siil, Okla. Ihe Wealher Swcnson. Her father Is cit.1: mis- sionary o! the First thurcn. Monday (o hear was df.wnb DFC to Odcssan Second Lt. James H. Hayncs of Odessa, in the U. S. Army 12th Air Force, has brr.n awarded the (ingulshcd Flyins Cross, according lo an Associated dispatch from '.Vashinglou. Tlie announce- ment was made by Ihc War Lieutenant Miller reached Ens-1 forrgo m. January 20. The Iwt leller rr-1 ,h, ceivcd by his wife, wriucn. March ,bly (0 havr fft Wgi] 11. Indicated he had been on i clim for ,0 Bnrt pv. i hi. first bombm? nr (far the abo-.it to go on il. Mrs. Miller Mlrt I Kebinsti Saturday she was sure n.is on ,h. one his first, if no, hi, first iha: is rd as "an tmpwtnnl government While reporter! to be wilii.na in S. DEPARTMENT OF Atlli.T.Nr. and ir.d mild Sunda tklnllj; ind Man ".i: See 1.7, Mil.LV.n, 9. Col. 7 in T AM HD1TI Ex-Students To Convene Today cabinet ?.r.rt PaTiiRmciit to dt-r'.rir tn their coming Govern- ir.f-r.t are operating in scccccv snd Finns here ftuiiuck bfcatu'e of i HOUSTON'. April i- ..V, i board nf of the Texas A i i and M college anythms, (elation will mcrt In Collrtr sta- rrRard tn thn prob- tor.iotro.' lo discuss the con-'lrm of Gmran troop.' In i-f htely jciancfr rv It was not known hr-rr what the hoard tow t( M. and Inn- iimc M't of nud former T. O. J- P. Kamblrn. a.'ssocia- tton president, wM today. At a meeting I here tonight Ihc ol rontin? buFinc.w of ti'-c association. i refused lo on .Nhai action the board take "I in th? torched off by tVie f 'csuge board's ol Dr. SVM- ton. Finland prnblrm on which ihr earlier pcacrt were said to have The theory was discuvcd when! the original tern-s were under con- 1 __ sldcration yeieral weeks aco that the Orrmaas mizht be In- 1 VIM.AND MAY GAIN Russia last night was reported stead of interned1.! they refused to I ready to nindify ils ricmand.s on Finland by permitting the Finn's (o rctain'ltnngoc and Viipnr.'. points which would al- the country voluntarily. W" P" I thoroughly outlined in Us directly across j'rom   

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