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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: March 26, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - March 26, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                RED CROSS WAR FUND CAMPAIGN BOX SCORl County Giffi Friday Contributions date fh VOL. LXIII, NO. 284. A TIXAS NEWgFAMft WITHOUT ORWITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OK TOES wWrCHVOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS JT ABILENE, TEXAS.-THiRTY.r'OUR PACKS IN THREE SECTION SIFKDAV SUNDAY FRONI LINE ALL MAJOR WAR NEWS EVENTUALLY, DESPITE POLITICS Bv .VES _tiu___ ____n _ __ By ,VES GALLAGHER LONDON, March 25 reporter who has been abroad any length of time receives letters from friends at home expressing doubt that we are able to give full ac- counts of what k going on because 9 of censorship and other restric- tions. four years on various Euro- pean war fronts it lo me that everything of Importance dees appear in American publications sooner or laler. I can recall only two or three incidents that have not, none of them Important enough to have any decided effect on the war. By the nature ot their busl- if ness, reporters and censors are !n constant conflict, but their quarrels over whit constllules military weurilr are rare, ind outnumbered ten to one by etlier of censorship. One of Ihese involves ttopplng In- foroiitfon yihlch rnljht "live or comfort io the enemy" and the other Is political, 11-was under the "aid and com- fort" clause that information was held up about the famous Patton face-slapping Incident and the shooting down of 23 at our planes during the Sicily invasion. It was not the first time in this war lhat Allied planes had been shot down by their own forces nor Is it likely to be Ihe lasl. Bad handling by the military In Ihese cases resulted when the story did break In their being exploited out of all proportion lo Iheir original value and in giving much more "aid and comfort" to the enemy than If they had been released-in or-Jlnnry channels when they happened. In addition, they created the idea that there are scores of such In- cidents being hidden by censorship, fostering distrust of war reports In general. .Too often military chiefs and interpret this phase of censorship as giving (hem the right lo stop anything that lives them discomfort. Political censorship, usually not admittedly exercised as such, has been encountered sporadi- cally under the guise ot being tied in with military security. Such was the censorship Impos- ed during the. early weeks of the United W.PJ PRICE FIVE CENTS North African campaign with re- gard lo the Darlan deal. Such cm-' sorship has invariably defeated It- selft because Ihe resulting lack o! j Information leads lo demands bj the British and American public, for more, resulting In a Hood o misinformation so much worse lhan (he iruili lhat authorities are fore ed to remove the barriers In self- defense. In general, the public receives a more accurate picture of the mili- tary situation than of the politi- cal one. Once >n operation Is start- ed, correspondents are given com- plete access to information and can send most of it. Tills has beer General Eisenhower's policy, al- though from lime lo lime In smal mnt'.ers It has been somewhai twisted by his suboidlnales. Reds Eight Miles of Rumania i LONDON. Jfarrh 35 MaJ. Volslav Liikatchevic. one.ot the com- manders in the Yugoslav Army, laid in an interview today that Gen. Draja Mihnilovic has troops armed and ready In the mountains of Serbia ready lo strike a signal from the Allies to clear path for Invasion. The statement coincided with the Only ID Miles From Backbone Of Rail System LONDON, Sunday, March 26 (AP) The Red army plunged to wilhin eight miles of. Rumania's eastern border yesterday and erected a 50- mile invasion' bridgehead on the Dniester river just across from Czer'nowitz, Rumania's northern capital in Bucovina and key to the Balkans, .Mos- cow announced loday. Hurling the Germans back toward the Carpathian moun- tains the Russians were only strategic y 'trt'rl. 1 '.'aricV 17: rfltler's rail Backbone the' railway run- ning, through that'city.' The loss of the line would split the German eastern front. The Russians also toppled the west Ukraine stronghold of Pros- kurov, breaking Into Ihe city east and west, and fought their way Into the outskirts of the Blaci iet port of Nikoiaev, Moscow said' Many. Germans routed from Pro- skurov later" gave themselves up vhile'thousands scattered into 'the roods to hide, the late bulletin lid. Other Impressive successes .scored by the Russians.on a front ex- ending from old Poland soulheast o the Black sea Included a 20- mile gain south of by-passed Tar- lapol in Poland. Ihe severing of he Byeitsi-Iasi railway in central iessarabia as Soviet troops stream- id southward toward the Danu- lebn and the overrunning of n Nazi rail escape route In the Slob- odzeya sector 110 mile.; northwest if Odessa, the communique said. The Russians now control al- most ISO miles of (he river. So- viet units fjnmnjr oul along the Dniester between Motiler Pedolski and Kamenti Podo- lsk were attempting to bag the Germans falling buck from Proskurov. (Radio France at Algiers quoted ONLY FIVE TOWNS LACK RED CROSS FUND QUOTAS All but live of 14 towns reporting largely instrumental in Ihe drive's last night are over the lop in the current Red Cross War Fund drive. In Abilene contributors spilled J2.644.59 into the war fund treasury to lift the total subscribed lo 282.22. still over short of the quota. Ed Stcwarl. county campaign chairman, to be- lieve the quola would be met before Ihe deadline, March 31. Urging again for workers lo Im- mediately report subscription, lisls. Stewarl'said a complete tabulation could not be made until all these W5'lle statistics were available. The chairman said Mrs. L. W. Hollis Jr. would-cail list success throughout the rural com this service. Reaches Sixteen in Abilene added to the 100 per cent bracket yesterday were Baker grocery, Bresenham gro- cery, Peach Street grocery, J. H. Day grocery, Food stores. Clinic Johnson Motor Lints, Federal Army store. Plaza hotel, Little hotel, the. Palace hotel. Charles Rulledge, community drive chairman. last night praised the MRTC group and Major David Evans, special service ofllcer, as Five British Air Officers Missing WASHINGTON. March 23-m- A British embassy, attache an- tOTE up s area of half an munlties. last tabulation: Town Giili Quota iradshaw 1501.00 1450.00 -aps 161.00 150.00 flmdale 153.69 150.00 206.60 MOM iuffalo Gap 204.00 350.00 'uscola 'ofosi; 100.00 1500.00 450.00 "J't. 271.20 250.00 Vylie 197.95 150.M >valo 47D.6T 350.00 'lew. l 316.75 300.00 350.00 Jarnby..- report) 250.00 3.625.00 Mio Quota) .W. Va.. March 25- m'dergrdund- fire generat- ing clouds of poisonous and explo- sive gases barred the way tonight to the bodies of 16 men died In n shattering early morning mine blast while they were vainly trying to slop the blaze. Fighting the flames which broke out In the No. 4 mine nf the Kath- erlne Coal company, the 16 were Allied Fo Slow Gain in Burma Zealanders Pinned Down In Cassino ALLIED HEADQUAR- TERS, Naples, March 25 (AP) New Zealand troops attempting lo drive westward through Cassino were pinned down in their southern sec- tion of (lie rubbled town to- day by highly-trained Ger- man parachute" troops ordered lo hold Ihcir positions at all costs. The New Zcalanders end the State Summons Young Actress In Murder Trial WAKE ISLAND GIVEN 16TH RAID; PONAPE HIT AGAIN By MCON'ARI) Associated Press Editor NEW YORK. March pressed down on the North Burma Japa- Wayne Umergau chpUnrt T while British India checked a tnrec-f.ngered enemy penetration of WCIsawas rairicd for llle 1Gtl> blonde showgirl esconed to the Iheater the iilglit be- fore his heiress wife was bludgeon- parachutists were fighting stub ed and strangled arrived today from Miami lo lestlfy as a state's witness in Ihe Royal Canadian aircraft- man's trial Io rfivst degree murder. Ixmergan's statement to detectives in Toronto when he .was taken Into cusiody identified the aclress, Mrs. Jean Murphy Jaburg, as the person he escorted to a. musical comedy and lo night cluhs on Saturday, Ocl. 23, nef there early in the war. Big American Army Liberators were met by intense anli-aim-afl fire as they bombed barracks nnd oil storage tanks Thursday. Poirape, in the Eastern- Caroline islands, was raided Wednesday and Thursday bv cannon-firing Mi.chells from Mi for s were ighting stub- fid rrjsti'ic-tprl al bornly and Growing to.-s of shell, he "ls'n Burton operatic ns th Soil hwo at one anth nude "odv was "WCM this Marshall aiolls (hey still 'hold. Bad weather restricted all on four at one ano'.her, but without effect- Ing much.change In the general situation, Allied headquarters an- aoinxei. The Germans. However, managed lo move Ihree more tanks Inlo the lobb.i- of the Continental hold, and a bitter fight between tanks and artillery nto raged around the hotel DCS Roses. Artillery lire which shook the. mountainous lullle area also reached lo poslllnns In the rear as the Allies sought to prevent Ibr Germans from. strenjlhen- Inu their holrl on Hit Verdun- likc Cassino sector. But the Ger- mans, commanded by J.I. Gen. Richard llrlnilrlrh to Imld al all rnsts, were believed in have the advantage .of ancient Innnrls honeycorablni Abbey hiillhroiish ijhtfli they were rclnforclnt th'Ur The firsl day's ntlack which fol- lowed the heavy tombing of Cas- March-15 lefl, the Geraiaas loltlhis approximately one-quarter of the quarter centered about the Continental hotel and :he exit from the town on the road ending around Moiiaslcry hill. Tile 'dative positions of the tno armies me varied only by a fen- buildings since then. At Ihe Anzio bridgehead (he Ger- mans hied to pcnctrnle Allied rle- ense positions with tanks and were jelieved to have lost two near C.ir- rocelo and five others west of Cls- ernn. The Germans kept tip shells on the beachhead rnln and an here also were clashes between in- rols. Allied headquarters announced heavy bombers flt rail nude "odv was !mmA her Beckman c' HIII apartment. He also has said he took her to lunch on Sundjy, horns after the sidle contends his heiress wile was The trial before Jiirige James Gar. icit Wallace and an all-male Jury will be resumed Monday, when the defense is expected to resume its stubborn battle-to keep Umcrgan's unsigned confession from becoming part of the trial record. Hopes fo Shatter Burma 'Hump' Mark By TJ'OBUHN WIAXT WITH AMERICAN- CHINESE FORCES IN NORTH front line defenders'. BURMA, March William Old of Uvnide, Texas, whose (n-ln-engliud Douglas cargo planes are supplying Allied trodps on all Burma fronts, said tortny, mrjle trips to Bur. ma In.u month with almost every- thing IninghiaWe In (lie KR.V of sup- piles. This month we hope to break thai record. Old's combined American-British supply operation probably is the largest of I is kind in Ihe world. Day and night Ins planes are loaded to the limit to bring whatever is needed In the drive against the Jap- anese. Many pilols make three or four round (rip.s dally. Al first planes could not land In Burma. They dropped supplies wtlh or without parachutes from alli- ranging trom tree-top level lo 2'CIM feet and then returned tion- .--.j, UUIJIUL-I.I .-.inrcx ni me rail lw iffi ;tna retuniea noil- Innks in tiir- caught by a terrific explosion Rimini and Anemia In the; lo their bases in India. Fre-; Lsh armored "orth nounced loday that two Royal Air Force wing commanders and four WAAP officers are missing and be- lieved killed, aflcr tailed to complete a Charleston, S. C.-Miami, Fla., airplane flight Friday. A member of the embassy staff said that Wing Commander H. G. Gnubcrt. together with anolher wing commander and the four WAAF officers took off from Char- eslon yesterday afternoon. When they failed'lo complete (he light. London was officially no'i- tne explosion. (led. he faid. that they were "miss- Ing and believed killed." All hope was abandoned lor the men and lonlsht crews began seal- nil? the mine to extinguish the un- derground V.3K. Jesse Redynrtl. state mire chief, said that (t would be five or six weeks before crews could be sent into the mine to re- cover the bodies. The death toll had been placed nl 15, but John Hogue. mine super- intendent, said a recheck hurt r-s- taWislttd lhat 16 had perished In while mediums, hit a number of places Including Leg- horn. The Allied Liberators ran Into at least 15 dog fight': In the north and the. Germans nlso flew n( least 85 sorties over the hcaciihend. The operations cost the Germans at least 19 plnncs while 11 Allied air- craft failed to relurn American destroyers shelled liny Pityihi island in lhc Admiralty group, flank- ing United Slates positions at Lorongau airdrome and on Hauwci island. Supply dumps were left in flames al Rabatil, New Britain, in oiie of a se- ries of light raids that includ- ed Kavieng, New Ireland; Alexishafi'ii, New Guinea, and Buka and Kahili in the Solomon islands. A spokesman for Admiral Will- iam Halscy commented that "Virtual eradication of Japanese air power In Hits, urea leaves Ihe enemy open for one continuous, re- lenlless air and sea oltenslve." American, Marauders, by yqulhlul Brig. Gen. Frank Merrjli and .the Chinese 38lh division en- circled retreating Japanese anri captured the village of Shnrtuzup in their drive toward Mcgnung lo sever mil connections south of My- Itkylna. The Chinese-American force wns "making slow but steady programs." Burmese Ghurlu levies, affiancing- toward Myftkyliu frnm Itic north, occupied Malh- tonjklu. Japane.st ibamtomri the village, Icjvlnf II in flames. Stiff lighting ws reported north- east, southeast and south of Im- Dlial against Ihree enemy columns trying to push toward lhat Brit- ish bnse in India. The Jnpanose, relyiiiR on elephnnls to carry sup- plies through Ihe jungles, lost five in Hie firsl cla.'h with Brll- unitf. The Invader; Flier Ihutes Safely ri.nu dinted (o safety from the P-47 h. Saturday afternoon anded, with mlllor the farm of Mrs. J. n. Porter thre. mllH northwest of .Vcrkel His plBne crashed about one and trucks from Camp Barkelev an Llcntcnnni WleczoVek was Ukeh Barkelev sialfon n Pital for Ireaimcnt of injnrrej'iourid not to be serious. As Is cusiomary. A board of of- J ccis has been iwmed by Col. Harry Wedcllngton. Abilene Air Base corrZ inaiidcr. lo determine cause of the 1 lemcnilnt r .i.-. LSI] Hunorcu units, me invaders miemly their errands look lliem be- made slight progress in spots, an GEN. MIHAILOVIC Announcement -by the Yugoslav fovernment In exile that Mihailo- vic's Chetniks recenlly hsd prrwcd en offensive to 'the very gates" o( Belgrnrie. "These troops have only limited ammunition and equip- ment." said the major who Ls In to seek airl for Mihailovic, 'Thai Is why they haven't been fighting. We figure it Ls better to make one big offensive than waste our bullet.'; in smaller actions. We are ready to clear any given area Jcr an Allied Invasion landing on notice." Both Britain and the United Elates have hern giving their main cupprrt in Viifwlavta !i the men o' Marshal Tito. Mihallovlc's rival, on the ground they were doing most the fUhtiiif against Ihe Ger- _ ranz von Papen, German ambas- The other four occupants of the sartor to Turkey, as having rie- nere not further Identified. clarcd Ihal the German army "per- haps" would abandon Bessarabia. establish a Carpathian mounlain defense line, and try to plug the 130-mile gap between the moun- tains and the sea with Ger- man and satellite troops to de- 1 fend Ihe Rumanian Ploesti oil re- gions "at all A Russian smash across the Dniester toward Czcrnowitz Cer- nautil was expected shortly. Seventy miles Loulheast of CiernoKiti, Rumania's ihird largest city, other Soviet units irestirard In Ressi- rahia on fia-mtle front can- fiiretf Zasalkatiy. nnly fljht from the rrut rirer, txiunrtary nf Rumania rroper'. .They also wtre nnlr so miles fast of Ciernowilz with the an- capture of Korjslov- tsy. southward toward the Danube. Marshal Ivan S. Konev's second Ukraine army also ouK- i flanked Ihe besieged railway Junc- tion of Byellsi Ballli wllh the cap- ture of RcuUcl. right miles to the RACK ItO.MK BY WAV OF New Top Price TWIN friaho, .Ntarch W) -A new top price for a Hereford i'jll J-oltl at semi-annual sales spon- Wored by the Trlaho Cattlemen's sodsliou was set here today when Xfark Donald 14th. owned by Her- bert Clianr'.ler. Baker. Ore., was purchased by M. V. ot Malid Idaho, for Doesn't Think FDR Wants Fourth Term ATLANTA, March organizing director p[ the National Farmers' union and frequent White House dinner guest was quoted by the Atlanta Journal' m a copyrighted story tonight as saying he did not believe Presi- dent Roosevelt would seek s fourth term. Williams, former heart of the Na- tional Youth administration, said c White House, after dining nitli Ihe president, "wtlh the distincl im- that he wouldn't run asain. he dWn't say so directly. He looked so tired'and worn that I was shocked." The president has had a series of colds 1 recently. May Make Stamps Good Indefinitely WASHINGTON. March 25-WI- The Office of Price Atfintnislrntmn is a plan to make red and bliie ration stamps valid fnr an indefinite period, it was Iranird to- niphl. At Ihe present lime, thr are validated for a fixed period. Un. hind enemy lines, wlilch meant Dial they were subjected lo ground fire as well as all Ihe customary haz- ards. Supplies still are dropped Irorr tlie air at some points, but manj planes now latul regularly at nev't airfields built by Americans under Ihe dircc'.lon of Mnj. Perley Lewis, of Phoenix, Ariz.- Tlie airfields are being used by hospital plunes which cvacualc the American anri Chinese wounded In less than an hour from nurme.sr bases to completely equipped hos- Allied communique said, nnd spokesman remarked 'the com- muniques are no more obsure than the military situation Itself." British In Snulliwcsl Burma made snull mills in Iheir push tnwart] the part nf Akyali. These forces nncl Ihe Nipponese in In- have their b.ieks toward each rtllirr anil art headed In opposite (iircctinns. Varying Chlne.'-p rcaclion to the enemy strike into India was re- dcr the Cuiiit felup. slmlhr lo provisions for shoe rationing, the stamps would be good until the OPA announced Ihcir cancellation. Such a step, a spokesman e.xplnin-1 ed. would help by vir- tually rltmlnaiin? thr last-minute buying rush thai develops under the fixed period valirlatin flecirrl in an abrupt drop In lhc Chtna-Burma-Inrila I7i.0 land iSlami to Burma, ihp South- igo and for casl A'ln indicated in was chief of stalf for Die Tcnlh Air reporting Ihe first low level slrike Force. i "t the "Flurmn-Siam" railway. Rail He v.as the first Army officer to were fly the "hump" rnute Inin Clilna by h" I'lancf.________ which the r.ow arc rccelv- addition, housewives lieveri of kecpins a rheck on the va- i' svslom in "lorc monthly lhan h r an average month over Ihe 'p'.: old Burma ronrt. rious expiration datrs. Meetings Planned Veterans Meeting Set in Washington Elder Buck Dies SAN ANGELO. March WASHINGTON. March DCTROIT. March Tile Oifice of rjrfensc lic-r. nnnouncerl pl.ins foriay for R series of nirir regional mreiincs ot ODT and War Food ArfminlMra- t tion officials (n dlscuu Ihe pro- gram for moving farm produce to Howard D. Buck. 95. Frank Buck of "bring rll, fame, died here this inrlKde one in Dal- '__________ 'las April 10 and 11. Idiot Lrt I III JIILHUILC IO falher of market anri supplies ID farms by back motor track. Thomas, president of the United Alltomnhilr: Wnrltpvs (CfOi. an- nntinccd today th.il a conference ot Big FDR Support ROSTO.V. March ?i-'.P, -Kobrrt F, Hannecan. chairman of (lie j national cnmniittee. said today tiierr was a "dellnilc rip-1 .sire" for fourth term for Presi- rirnt Rwiscteli. not nnly nniotijj but many Re- p-ib'.icau.s wiih he has talked in liis current swing around the Expect Lava Flow To Resume Soon NAPLES. Mnrch collapsing the weight of dust ami ashes coughed up bv Mt Vesu- vius have killed 21 Allied military government officials an. nouncccl today, bringing ,he total The crater began hurling off greater smoke and ashes this after- noon. after a 12-hour lull. nr.d Pro- ?.1" lhc on Vesuvius, c "4cWs !hat he The Wealher r nr rnM .i.xr. .INI, vin.virv: war velerans whn are members al j ro'.mtry. the UAW-CIO would mi-ct in Wash- "I aw especially he adrt- ir.eton April 6-7 "to wntc out In I erl. "bv (he fact thai many perrons (rpcdfic detail (lie prozram i riaie told me lhat, .ilthoiigh they for rc-rmrilnyrr.cm ar.tl rrhabihia- j are registered Repuh'.ican.' snd Hil f-t southwest, putttne tlte onh1 55 miles u bl? RumanEan yoiid Ihe Prul. To the cast lacking southward of veterans rct'unlng VVnrld War II." army ITALY AND [mm have hern for uianv years, they In- lentt to lotr for Ihe prefiileiit." the Hospital the capture of Ivfendzovka and began fighting ihclr way Into the outskirts of the big city of S'lia. a few miles east of the railway, no miles northwest of Odessa, and 75 miles from the naln German escape roule the Odessa-Tiraspol line which extends Channel For New Bombings M" IhP hravlm ,m the Baltic sea nf Kiel ta rs atlcr he s ___ into to imperilled lut.'ion.lhe Cripsholm. was woiinrlci! and Ilaly while fif 36lh Division ______....... He was (akcu In H 'argcts. near Ahniich senl home' c raid on Berlin Friday night i tons of ex- arm xvas am a German surgeon llc plosives were rained on the bat- ...ill. Oerman capita) roared smaller ling the English channel last last Sept. 13. jnlghl to strike again conlinen- i _ In pass nvrr Ihe cnast. .Vnt >II nf tliem appear- tA (o he hraitrri In (he samr di- rection. II look the irmaiin nl Mf British Thnnderblrdi an hour The force over on? than (he area .srrmcrl rrnrlv l.noo i It ttas the rirr Rrrlin pre- vimahlv of Ihf hnmbrr< fell In airway hjllle to e.r over the elly. to several French port Air de.'fn-.e the Gfrir.an, vn hair' Berlin M Kg Hie Baltic ses nf Kiel surt: othfr riijectivr-s. Tlip Oermans ssid cl'.irj. Islimf a favorite rfiversloiwry: Tr.c Berlin Wow climaxed one target of previous Berlin laicis- of the most terrific 60-hcur bomb- ?nd also were hit and lha: i m.i periods of (he war leaving four l 111 planes were donnerl of Oermany's great war centers m! U. S. medium Marauders cover- burning, 'ightcrs slash-1 In addition to Ihe capital they seen in; rri at the rail city of Hirton In. are lhc naval base of Kiel, the France yesterday, con- j aiicraft the Mr olfpnsivr apaiiul rity of t1 center i   

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