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Abilene Reporter News: Thursday, March 23, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - March 23, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                 WAR BOND SCORE  Over-alt quota , Total Sales Series E quota Series E Sales  $3,245,000.00  4,039,168.75  1,303,000.00  1,316,124.25  Wi)t Abilene 3l^eporter~i^eto^ MDRMIVG  WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKEl CH YOUR XX'ORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES”-B\Ton    -  VOL. LXIII, NO. 251  A TEXAS    NEWSPAPER  ABILENE, TEXAS,WEDNESDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 23, 1944  -TWELVE PAGES  Assoctaied Press (AP) United Press fU.P.) PRICE FIVE CENTS  Four German Aircraft Factories Blasted  .ap Rabaul Defense Almost Disappears  By LEONARD MILLIMAN Associated Press War Editor A dwindling air fleet which for the first time refused to , Eight in defense of Rabaul emphasized today Japan’s failing bold on the Bismarck Sea.  A spokesman for General MacArthur reported yesterday that raiders from the South Pacific found the smallest air force and the fewest ships seen in Rabaul's harbor since the Allies began pounding that New Britain base.  Japanese Zeros failed to of-  Xhildren, Old "Folks Saved =0n Eniwetok  By WrLLIASI L. WORDEN Associated Press War Correspondent ^ (Representing the combined ■»    American pressi  ABOARD U. S. FLAGSHIP OFF ENIWETOK. Marshalls. Feb. 21 — (Delayed 1—Forty - eight miserable natives. Including 12 women, nine men and the rest infants and « shocked children, reached our lines • safely on Eniwetok island during the fight for possession of the coral key of Eniwetok atoll.  ■iliey now are bivouacked in shell holes along the bcach. pending 'removal to other Islets. The ^ natives included no young men. They presumably had been removed by the Japanese as workers  Truk Attack Impresses Japs Most  NEW YORK. Feb. 22—i^P)—^The Japanese news agency Domel ad- i Domei's evaluation of Japanese rcacUon to the Truk assault and the mitted in a broadcast to the controlled Asiatic press today that the report of Tojo s talk to his ministers were recorded by U. S. government United States assault on Truk had impressed the Japanese people more than any other development since the start of the war.    monuors.  At the same time another Tokyo broadcast to Japanese areas said | In an apparent attempt to explain to the Japanese his moilvcs for Premier Hideki Tojo had told his ministers that "the war situation Is' ousting Field Marshal Gen. Sugiyama as chief of staff of the army and  , the present ■  The Domei broadcast to the controlled press of Asia said the imperial headquarters admission of the loss of 18 ships at Truk —“losses greater than the enemy’s’*—had proved to be “the one among all the announcements heard by the people since the start of the war that created the deepest impression.”  HEAVY OPPOSITION MEETS BOMBERS; ALLIES SUFFER  LONDON. Feb. 22—(AP)— Major aircraft factories at  fer opposition as American bombers again ripped up a newly-repaired airdrome. It was the first • time an interceptor fleet, usually numbering between 50 and 100 has not met a daylight attack on Rabaul.  President Roosevelt. Prime Minister Churchill and Secretary of the Navy Knox all called attention to Japan’s disproportionate losses in the Pacific.  Ninety-two Nipponese ships were destroyed in the last throe ”eeks. Knox reported, against a loss of two American submarines.  "The air power of Japan also is being overmatched and worn down.” Churchill said. So far this month 580 Japanese planes have been destroyed definitely and 106 probably. Fifty Allied planes were shot down.  President Roosevelt estimated tlie enemy was lost 1,000 barges in the last year, involving the death of thousands of sailors and troops. His estimate was conservative. In the Southwest and South Pacific, where barges and luggers are Tokyo's primary means of transport, a to oth^r islands’ in the mid-Pa- j total of 890 of these craft have been cific, as was done elsewhere in the ¡sunk and 485 damaged since Oct. I.  Fleet Admiral Osami Nagano as navy chief of staff and himself assuming , four citics deep inside Germany \vere blasted today in co-  the army post. Tojo was reported to have described the move as an effort j ordinatcd assaults by American heavy bombers from Britaia to consolidate “political aiid military commands.”    ■  or    -first and effective ^n,onst^tio„ ot the foM..  ) certain victory is to establish still closer relations between the high i barreled assault system towards which the U. S. Strategic command and state affairs.”    Air Forces in Europe have been working called out some of  the bitterest German fighter opposition of the war. Some of the bombers from Britain fought for four hours against rocket-firing Nazi planes manned by highly-skilled pilots. As many as 200 German planes swarmed up at some places to challenge the raiders.    ,    "  Bernburg. Ascherslcben and Halbersladt were the points slammed by the bombers from Britain, while those from Italy struck two vital Mcsserschmitt fighter plants at ReRensbiM'g.  Forty-one of the BritL«5h-basod bombers are missmc after a serir.«; of great bnttle.s with skilled German fighter pilots, a U. S. Army air force comnunuq\ie said, American escort fighters shot down 58 of the enemy, with one American fighter definitely destroyed and 10 mls5tng. The bombers' score against t.he German fliers has not yet been tabulated, the communl-  Sides in for New  taly  Fight  ALLIED HEAL:)QUARTERS. Na-, ple.<i, Feb, 22—vPi—Allied and Cler- j man heavy giin.s pounded each oth- ' [crs hnr.s ui lieavy artillery duelling | j on the .^nzin beachliead today as 1 both sides recuperated from unbroken days of bitter fightuig ..nd prepared for further battle.  Fighting on a comparatively small scale took place yesterday near Car-roceto. scene of the heaviest NazJ assaults last week, without a decision benip reached.  But. for all the temporary lull in the maiii conflict. American and British troops gripped their rifles firmly and remanied constantly on the alert for a third enemy eff-'rt to clrne them into tlie sea 'Fhey fell if would come, for the Nazis were believed still under Hiller's pcr.sonal order to wipe out the beaclUiead at any cost.  Marshalls;    -  Genei'ftlly our casualties. have T been light, most of them wounded rather than killed. One of our tanks was stopped by one of the few Japanese field encountered but the crew escaped except for  °"ou'r ^artillery attack on Parry Is-^ land, just north of Kniwetok island. .started sporadically several davs ago and continued to gain in inten.sitv until today, when most of our fleet trained its guns on that i.sland. The task force sailed by Parry last week without draw-♦ Inp fire.  Officers found the heavy enemy concentration on Eniwetok. one of the largest and highest islands in aW the Marshalls, permitted larger and deeper defenses of pillboxe.s  ■    and foxholes. The eastern end of *■ the Island had been treated only  liehtly tay high explosives before our successful landing, which was opposed bv raflcmen.  lAdm. Chester W. N. Nimitz announced Monday night. Feb. 21.  ■    that Eniwetok island had been cap-** tured after overcoming enemy resistance.I  Red Planes Bomb " Turku, Finn Port  STOCKHOLM. Feb. 22—hV'— Tlie Finnish port of Turku was bombed tonight bv Russian planes, a dispatch from Finland said.  An alert had sounded in Helsinki. but there was no indication the capital had been attacked again, it said.  Russian airmen also were reported active over Northern Finland. with alarms being sounded at Haparanda and Tornio on the Swedish-Finnish border.  Ii was presumed the Gerr base at Rovaniemi was a target for the Soviet planes.  ^ Al-tack Denied  CAIRO. Feb. 22—The Yugoslav government in exile denied officially today an attempt had been made to assassinate King Peter, as reported yesterday by Moscow radio in a Cairo-dated Russian news agency dispatch.  HERE THEY FIGHT—The Allied countcrattack has thrown advancing Gccinans back better than a mile in the April ia sectoi, Avjiilc ,ij?yal ;bombari|pxc|jt ^n^'. po.ntinuqiis air ijlov harirass the Nazis." Here new'Tiattlcs'arc expected soon.  (rivoi Rog Gives Up On Red Anniversary  Each can carry from 30 to 300 men, i*i addition Jto the crew  Only a-fraction of these would have to be loaded with troops for the Japanese to have been hit worse than appears on the surface, a;  Roosevelt suggested.  The clearest picture of disproportionate enemy losses of men is in the conquest of the Marshalls. Around 10.000 Japanese were annihilated. We lost about 440. Final figures awaited the fall of Parry island, last unit to be taken on Eniwetok atoll, and a count of casualties.  The total American ' figure should vary only slightly.  „ LONDON, Wedncsdav. Feb. 23—(AP)—On tlie 26th an-pr.c”'to'pario“theTonquesr'‘of -«iversary of the Red armv today Moscow celebrated the cap-Kwajalein and Eniwetok atolls and Uurc of Krivoi Rog. the Ukraine town of iron mines, and that it means—dominance of I Premier Marshal Joseph Stalin triumphantly announced that n one year the Russians had swept the Germans from ahiTOst ;hree-quarters of occupied Russia in a westward advance that In places exceeded 1.000 miles.  At the same time a Soviet information bureau statement announced “the German Fascist war machine has been placed by the Red army on the verge of complete defeat.”  Stalin announced yesterday the ciipture of Krivoi Rog. which the Germans had defended with fanatic zeal in four month.«: of bitter fighting, Gen, Rodion Y. Malinovsky’s ihird Ukrainian front forces took the valuable town by storm, an order of the day announced a few hours after the Germans admitted they had evacuated u. The iron mines captured were a major military prize.  The Soviet communique, recorded by the Soviet monitor from a broadcast. added that 300 more communities were captured in the north, where the Germnn,s were retreating upon Pskov along a 150-miie curving front.  the Marshalls and new bases to strike at Truk. Ponape and Kusaue in the Carolines and at Wake island to the north.  But Knox cautioned that the •big. well-equipped and fanatically brave" Japanese army has scarcely been touched. “There is nothing to justify any estimates of an early en of the war in the Pacific,"  Ovalo Flier Is Reported Missing  OVALO. Feb. 22—First U. Robert L. McAdams, pilot on a Flying Fortress stationed in England, has been listed a.s missing in action over Germany since Feb. 4. hi.s brother. Bennie McAdams of Dallas. was informed Tuesday.  Lieutenant Mc.\dams was commissioned a second lieutenant in the AAF advance flying school at Marfa in May. 1943. He attended Ovalo schools where he was a star basketballer and aUo Abilene Christian college.  He is a nephew of Sid McAdams. 2624 South 10th. Abilene. His other brother. J. E. McAdams, also live.s in Dalla.«. and he has a sister. Glad.\s McAdam.5.  The Weather  OF COMMERCE  cloudy loda  te\  d*v. Wrdne  ortionn Thurtda  TE.MPERATURE.S  irh *nd low temperatures tn 9 p.m., Irh and Inw aamf. date last jear.  nni^t U»t nlrhi. 1;at.  BurUe thii mornlnf, 8:11.  VFW Head Backs'  Aid to Business  HOUSTON, Feb. 22—Na-tional Commander Carl Schoenin-ger of the Veterans of Foreign Wars today called for government I financial assistance to small busi- j ness during the reconversion pe- i riod to create a reservoir of em- I ployment for returning veterans.  -Postwar employment for return- , ing veterans will have to compri.-^e ' more than WPA or any kind of pick-and-shovel endeavor." the 49-year-old Detroit municipal electrical engineer a.v^erted in an interview.  It was at Pskov in 1918 that the Russians defeated the Germans in a battle which has hern officially designated as the .\rmy‘s beginning. In the eele-bratinn of tliis date Stalin announced that in the three months of the current winter campaign the Russians have clcared the invaders from about 77.000 square miles, won back over 13,000 populated places including 82 towns and 320 railway stations.  "It should now be clear to all that Hitlerite Germany is advancing inevitably towajds catastrophe," Stalin said, but he warned against over-conficience or compla-  Connaily Views Greater Texas  Wales Plans Legal Action  Training of troops stationed at Camp Barkcley !.s being interfered with bernti.'ie peoj^ln are di.'irepnrd-ing the law bv grazing li\e.-.tork within tiio 65.000-acre maneuver area we.st of the camp. .<^aid Col. Victor W. B. Wales, camp commander, ye.Ucrday.  The camp command lia.s followed a ix>licy of cooperation and patience in Hllowmg Iflndowners and tenants plenty of lime to remove their .slork. property and them-selvci- fi’om the maneu\er area, said Colonel Wales.  Beginning now. he emphasi?-cd. no further concessions can be made and legal action will be instituted without delay.  Firing of various type.s of weapons. larg^ and small, will be under way daily in all pari.s ..f the 65,000-acre reservation from now on, ,said Colonel Wales  It is absolutely inipcrati\e ti^at 11 people and all li\estock be krpi  (raling yesterday tn the so-called “factory** area of Aprilia, just east of Carroc^to. but were scattered by accurate fire of Allied artniery ani’ the nttaek. if one was contemplated, did not materialize.  As fighting for the beachhead entered its second month v.ithout either grim antagonist showing any sign of yielding, the Allies still held approximately IDO sqtiare miles of ground—all of it stibject to Nazi artillery fire from the hills.  Boundaries of the holding, tart-Uig from a point on the coast northwest of Anzlo. run more or le.s.^ in a straight eastward line, pa.vsi^ig about a mile and a half sovith of Carroceto to a point abniit two miles southwest of Cistcrna. then due south to the beach again.  ¡Making his first visit to the scene of last week's tiesperate fighting. Edward Kennedy of the Associated Press today described the beachhead as “no brilliant Wetory. • o triumphal entry Into Rome, but a hard, gruelling struggle against odds and with risks, whicli has tied up a great German force on the southern front and whicti probably will have a profound effect on the course of the war.”  Kennedy said the present prospect was that the Allies would hold the beachhead against every a.s-.sault, and. wlien the Nazis liad spent themselves, would strike back in force. He sai<l some boy.s .7 and 18 years old were among the attacking German forces, but that others represented the cream of Hitler's army.  May Make Nazis Rebuild Ruinée Historical Cities  WASHINGTON. Feb. 22—— Speaking over a radio hookup from here in connection with installation ceremonies of an Owens-Illinois glass company plant in Waco. Tex,. Senator Connaily declared today that w’ar-born industrial activi*'es in Texas “are but harbingers " of what the state will do in peace, "Texas offers alluring and compelling inducements to industrial development." he said “Her natural resources, the mildness of her climate, and the variety of he products all join in extending a beckoning hand tow ara those seeking the lan,est and most promlsin:: opportunities.  ••In aircraft, factorK-<, in shipbuilding plant.«;, in s>nrhctic rubber plants, in hiKh octane ta.s-oline production. in ceneral peiioleum p-o-duction. m tlie production of clothing. tents and mattres,ses for the comfort of our armed services, it is performing magnificently.  •These things are bvii harbineers of what Texas will do in post-war Limes of peace.  •‘The record of Texas boys In this war challenges the most brilliant pages of military annals of the earth. The spirit of the .\lamo :uid of Goliad and of San Jacinto has been transmitted through the generations to the brave and heroic men who are now fighting in defense of ail the great things we He stated that Germany has been I love, Texas in war is giving her best  he entire re.servation. he ' emphaMic.cd  Lt Col. Armon H Bust, Ciinn Barkcley executive uflucr. said tha in a number of inst»n<cs .soldirr in training had set up yuns <mly n find a herd of sheep on ti.p rant:c Several time.s sheep hit', c been kill ed and. after iinnt: 'I'oniiir. «un. have ii;ui to he u.scd to kill shccj maimed by earlier fuint:  There are a number of landing strips for small planes in the maneuver area . nfl oftentimes planes eantiol land because sheep are «ra/inE on the fields, said Colonel Host.  WASHINGTON. Feb. 22—-’re'-iflent Roase\plt told a pre.ss-adio conference fodn\- t^hat he be-ved .serioii.^ consideration should -iven to tiie Idea of comt)ellinE ' GerniHnv. «ite: the war to furnish - Uie labor and material for rebuilding hi.stoi ic and eecle.sia,';t leal ’[monuments de.sirovrd a.s a re.sult  LONDON. Feb. 22 i./p—An air raid alert sounded in London tonight.  The capital's anti-aircraft guns opened up with a steady barrage a few minutes after the alert and alarm bells, signaling that the raiders were directly overhead, were run In some office buildings.  The sustained, full-throated barrage indicated the raid was heavier than the previous night’s attack.  of  Mr  bv the Roosr',  elt sHid he had bf'pn  hi.stori«’ bnildin  que added.  Losses in the operations from Italy have not yet been announced.  The bombers from Britain sucoes.sfully attacked the .runkers 88 assembly plant at Bernburg, for the second time In three days, and major airframe and component factories at Asebercleben and Halber-stadt. while those from Italy struck at Regensburg.  niasc from Britain also attacked air field.s and other targets in Southern and Central Germany, and tho.se from Italy bomber ports on the nalmatlan coast and the Zacrcb airport.  irome grouiw of the force from Britain penetrated Germany so decplv ihat their flglUcr c.scort was \inable to go all the way with them.  Filers In ojie group said they were i-ngaged in a four-hour battle with C?crman fighters which at-tackeii in waves of 10 or more Several estimated they .saw at least 200 cnein\ plinies, pollted bv ohMou.slv .<;kilied men who Jumned Iheni after the bombers got be-\ond rante of the esc(M t. 'Hie Ger-inan.s used maiiy rockets.  I lynig f ortresses and Liberators of the >1editeranean air command attacked Regensburg. .SO miles north of Munich and .’>.■>0 miles from the major Allied airdrome in Italv at Kog-ijia. the airfield of the Croat capital of Zagrrh: harbod works at the Dalmatian port of /.ara: and Sllenlk, :iO miles farther do\»n the coast.  Swedish  Capital  bombed  STOCKHOLM. Feb. 22    —  Bombs from ' foreign planes” fell in Stockholm tonight for the first Ime in the war and the official Swedish news agency said citizen* of the neutral capital were in a ••parUc mood ■’  The bombs landed in an open air theater in Southern Stockholm and In the to^ni of Strangnas. just west of StockhoUn. No persons were reported killed or injured, but thousands of windows were said to have been shattered by the explosions.  Signal lights dropped ' by the planes indicated they were trying to land. The air raid sirens which have been- tested at 3 p m. each Monday were not sounded, although an emergency alarm went out to home guardsmen.  iA Reuters dLspntch from London .said that according to an tm-conflrmed report, a Russian bomber had crashed at Nacka, near Stockholm I  The planes approached the city from the east.  The raiders, officially described as * foreign planes. ’ passed over tha Stockholm archipelago and dropped three bombs in Strangnas. a communique said. TIto number dropped on Stockholm, where an emergency alarm was sounded, was not given, Stockholm, founded tn 1250. has a population of about .'S50.000 persons and i-s situated on several islands and the adjacent mainland between a bav of the Baltic and Lake Malar.  floiiflv  ike tlie Benedictine Mona.ste fah  ît ha.s been sugRcsted that a <riptlon fund be rai.spd to rei he mona.stery. the ehlef p:< i\’e said, but he pointed out  members of  College Heads Ask Arniiy Plan Change  WASHINGTON. Feb, 22- — A hommittec of college presidents, meeting here to dlscu.ss the Army’s drastic reduction in its student training program, urged the War Department today to enroll 100.-OOO volunteer 17-^ear-olds and send them to college this .summer.  Tlie Armv\ pre-inductlon program for 17-'. ear.old.s now includes le.ss than 5,fX>n bov«.  The educator«; voted to requer^ an Immf'diati' e\nans:on of thVs  ations group.  .vho  •fighting  ' in  Burns to Death  DALLAS, Feb. 22—<JP>—A 9-year-old girl burned to death, one person was injured, and several persons jumped to safety when fire swept the upper floor of a two-story frame apartment house here today.  The body of Greta Bess Hargraves, daughter of Mns. Oma Hargraves. was iotaid in an upstairs I southeast of Dno~an advance of 19 hallway.    | miles.  itli all her main for . ont • but emphasized the i in dauntle.ss gallantry  fighting alliance of Russia, the----  United States and Britain and .said the hour Is approaching of the final reckoning far all the crimes committed by the Hitlerites on Soviet soil and in the occupied countries of Europe."  The advance toward Pskov in the past 24 hours brought the Russians to within 10 miles of Dno. halfway point between Staraya Rus.sa and Pskov. More than 200 localities were raptured in thL«; area alon''. includinc Mikhaylovskoye. 10 mile.s  hich patriotism and  Bankers Elect  FORT WORTTI. Feb. 22— Elmer Stearns, vice president of the First National bank. Matador, was elected chairman, and R. L. Grimes, president of the Panhandle State bank. Borger. was named secretary of the seventh district. Texas Bankers association Tuesday at the one-day convention  Fort Worth ua.s again selected a;: the place for the 1945 meeting oi the group.  Some pcr.sons who in sided in houses nt,ith oi road have moved bark without permi.ssion, -au!  Both Colonel Wales and hi-exccutivc officcr pointed out that the W’ar department took possession of the maneuver ar' under unrestrictetl lease or by outright purchase in order to have complete possession without interferenee.  dlscln-.of!. but  V reported id hangars rcraft fire  atlon.s was s officially formations  Mild  old  >non.se to r]ue.stif)ns that he ; :nt it should apnl'.- onlv to  tures and not tn a general  of KI  to dc-  riefe  This was ncce . train troops projif i i  Haskell Man Seeks Collector's Post  b> bonibers based in B: ba.sed in It;  ia<-torie,s and oth-(if'rmat;- already 0 ton.'- of bomb.s in ia-..s, were hit again the Ktclith ,Mr force in and the Fifteenth  andow  allowe  n all faii-lers tlieni-splendidly, ^id Colonel it mast of  HASKELL. Willle I.ane, w îion of treasi fnijnall;.' amif for the office lertor. It w;is  ha.s 1 r thrr  pointed to fi .‘•e.s.soi -collect didate hr h Forma’.lv election to  need his canrlida<'. of tax a.'-scAsor-col-•arned todav,    !  V. lio had l)een ap- j lie office of tax a.s- Cl YDP: ^ill not be a can- ' .^nclers^ul  Several month.s the landowners to move all livcstxxk •‘It should be . ness, that the selves have coiji with few except!  Best. •‘The far'  these sheep and taifle are owned j clerk Is Horace O’Neal ft Ls be-by persons who had no laixl in the , heved he will be unopposed.  reservation and arc grazing their !----  sheep as trespa,sser.s in every scilsc.  Some of the former owners of the land have prote:>ted becaiLsc they feel the range will be ruined and the value of the land depreciated in ca.sc they .'•h<-.u’'l *-ver havr op-portunitv after Mir war r>f re-occupying the lard or re-purrhai.mg It," said the camp command.  Anderson Heads Red Cross Drive  Index Drops  W'ASHINGTON. Feb. 22—  The cast of living inrlex showed a dvop of 1 wo-trn‘lv‘^ of one permrt between mid-De<ember atiri n\ld-.lanuary Labor Secretary Perkms reported today.  Frb 22 iSpl.>—D, J. )f liaird. retired railroad [man, ha.»; been appohUed county-ir re- I''ide Red Crass chairman for the district ! March drive. Ace Hickman and B. O. Brame, also of Baird, were named to chairmanship of the bu.‘5iness di.strict solicitation, and Mrs. R. A. Hall Is residential chair-  Mrs. Hickman and Mns, L. L. Blackman have been presented the 20-year .scrvice bars for continuous senice in Red Cros.*; work Mrs Hickman has .served a.s vice-chairman, and Mrs Blackman as surgical dressing chairman.  Henry G. Sellers Dies of Pneumonia  D.-\t.I.,\S. P’eb. 21— -P'—Henry Cirad\ Sellers, brother of Attorney General Ciro\er Sellers, died today at the \etei-iins hospital at Lisbon. He u a.s 34. had been in 111 health .'^lnce sei-Miu: ’.vith a veterinary cotV' 'h France durine World War I, and died after a 3-week siege of pneumonia Tlie attorney general came from Aiu^^tin yesterday to be at his bed>ide  limerai service.'« will be held tomorrow at Sulphur Springs, his home town.  THE TAX PRIMER AVAILABLE FREE!  As a public service. The Reporter - News is offering The Tox Primer, a 16-poge booklet prepared by The Associoted Press, os o simple guide through the intricacies of incorno tax returns.  Coll for yours at The Re-porter-News Business Office ... It's Free!  ilf requested by mall, please include 5c for postage and  ^Tapping.)  --'-Iti   

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