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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: March 17, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - March 17, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                gftrilene RED CROSS WAR FUND CAMPAIGN BOX SCORE County quota Contributions Thursday .0 dote OR WITH OWJiNSE TO KRtKNDS YOUR WORLD KXACTLV AS IT VOL, LXIII, NO. 274 A TEXAS NEWSPWES MORNING ABILENE, TEXAS, FRIDAY MORNING, MARCH 17, 1044 -TWENTY PAGES Press IAP) Knifed Prea IV.P.) PRICE FIVE CENTS Allies Occupy 3-4th of Cassino "Manus Invaded; Land Bombe rs Hit Iruk ALLIED FORCE HAS ONLY MINOR LOSS IN ADVANCE By LEONARD MILUMAN Associated Press War Editor American iiiiijiliilmms forces invaded Manus island, largest of (lie Admiralty group in the Southwest Pacific, Wednesday, while land-based Liberators made their first rait) on Truk presaging frequent bombings of Japan's great- est Central Pacific stronghold. Infantrymen, including the First Cavalry Division from Texas, splashed ashore on Manus under the cover of a heavy barrage from warships..planes and artillery, the latter fir- ing from nearby islands, Gen. Douglas MacArthur reported today. The invaders suffered only minor losses as they push- to within half a mile o! Lorengau airdrome, the only one 'in (he Admiralty group that Allied Air Forces aren't already using. New air Truk, and Rabaul were reported as a high ranking naval officer predicted the (American fleet would lie close enough to Tokyo in another to Mast the reluctant Japanese navy out of its harbors. The Liberators rode in on Triik under cover of darkness to drop (heir bombs just be- fore dawn on Dublon and Etcn islands. Dublon is a major supply and ship repair base, lilen i: an air field. JTlicy flank the anchorage where carrier-borne Ameri- can planes surprised Japanese warships Feb. 16 in a two day foray that cost the Japanese 23 ships and 201 airplanes. Wednesday's raiders flew from re- cently capliued air fields in the Western Eniwe- tok. 750 air miles from Truk, or Kwajalein, about miles dis- tant. The TruJc strike was coordinated with attacks on three-other Eastern Caroline islands and two atolls in fiustav V BacksRed STOCKllOLif, March 16 Tlie Swedish foreign office said in a King Gustav V had communicated lo rinnlsh. authorities" his view that Finland accept Russia's armistice terms. (A Moscow dispatch by Associat- ed Press Correspondent Eddy Gil- said lhat Soviets had printed no news from Iheir own sources since the initial report of the terms lor negotiation. In which they lold the Finns they expected a quick rc- Tiie Russian people appeared be setting in "an ugly mood towards Pimw." the dispatch said, and are suggesting "nnYncuirttc A spokesman for the Swedish [or- cign office explained thai the com- munique was ptompted by a puu- lished report lhat Hie S'.i'rdifh mon- %rch had scut a letter to field Mar- shal Baron Carl Gustaf Manner- helm and other high r'innish the Eastern 'Marshalls. The blow at Truk is Ihe most advanced ac- tion by land-based Central Pacific forces. 'Jin another year we'll be pretty close to said Rear Adm. Frederick C. Sher- man, an aircraft carrier task force commander. "Jf the Japs won't come out and fight, we'll sink them in their harbors with our carrier-borne planes." Tiie Nipponese fleet has long frniri Ihr Sntith- w-est P.icilic where its air force 'is now being eliminated. Allied planes made their Fifth straight raid on Werak, only strong air center re- maining to the enemy In Northcist New Guinea, shooting down five in- terceptors ns targets were blasted with 140 tons of explosives. The urcs advocating acceptance of the airdrome, town and harbor of Ra- lcrms baul, once the key to Japan's Soulh- The Dageus Ni'hcter said it. ap- Pacific defense, were heavily that the King did not write damaged by 173 tons of bombs "fanucrhcim personally, hut lhat dropped by Solomons-based planes. the Swedish foreign office undoubt- edly sent a note to him and pro- bably to President Risto Ryli. FDR Makes Appeal to People WASHINGTON. March President Roosevelt, appealing di- rectly to the Finnish people to end the partnership" with Ger- today threw the weight ot his office into Brl- tish-American efforts to persuade Finland to accept Moscow's peace terms. Although Finnish parliamentary was construed in Stockholm i and olhr-r capitals ns tantamount to rejection of Soviet armistice pro- posals, it is understood that this government, has received no such official interprelalion and still holds the hope tli.il Finland will not close doer to a way oul ol Ihe war. A hopeless hnl prrsistent ciglil day Japanese offensive on Bougainville trying to cul off Ihe Rabaul raiders a( Ihe source, has cost the Japanese soldiers. Ten Japanese have died for every American. Tn Northern Burma Chinese speeded tip their advance down Ihc Hukawng valley, capturing a vil- lage 12 miles south of Walawbum. Tills brought them near the en- trance of Mogaung valley leading to (he Mandalay-Myltkyina rail- road, primary supply source for Japanese army forces in Norlh Bur- ma. Restriction Off DALLAS. March Tile War Production board said here to- day that all restrictions on the manufacture of barbed wire and woven wire fencin? have been re- moved. GERMAN BOMBS HOME "TOWN-WITH VIGOR SOPA SOPA Boudeuse A LM if Bay MANUb ,n. LOS 4 PURDYIS, ALIM ADMIRALTY ISLANDS ri-------------------rCn STATUTE MILES X, 20 Bombs Again Ifew Germans Battle lo Hamper Advance AU.1KD tlKADQUAKTKKS, Naples, Alar. T_ Allicil iroojis had m-cupird Ilirrc-fotirllis of strategic Cas- LOiMJOrx Mar. 115 ioniKhl afler fifth Army Mew a path through American fliers altacknif; town, field dispatches said, and ivcrc mop- Soulhern Germany in groat nf C.crmans. strength fought one (if the: Some Of Ormans apparently had reeiUered tht most spectacular aerial hat- j WI-Pckagc after Hie shattering, of Ihis town, which lies on the les of (lie war loday in a lo RomCi ijV bomb assault, smashing.sequel lo record Devastation 'wrought h.y air and accompanying ar- IM night raids on Stultgavt bombardment liniulicnppcd Ihc advance of Allied in- T 'nnn forced (o poke H1Cir way SCENE OF NEW island, largest of the Admiralty group, has been in- vaded by Americans. The Yanks pushed to within half a mile of' Lorengau airdrome which is closer to Los Negros, invader! February 29. Losses in the attack were light. Soviets Wipe Out Three Encircled Nazi Divisions LONDON'; .March 16 _-Hfl'r-T The (the. Russians pushed-on lo envelop Red army has cut.the erinlca trunk railway serving liuft'd- rcds of thousands of disaster-rid- den Germans In Southern Russia, sealed olf the big Black sea port o( Bikolaev on three sides, and wiped out three encircled German divisions originally estimated at 000 men, Moscow announced 10- light. Nikolaev's capture was believed to be Imminent. Vapnyarka, 25 miles from (he Dniester rirer frontier of Rumania's Bessarabiin territory, fell on Wed- nesday to .Marshal Ivan S. Konev's second Ukraine army, said AT A FLYING FORTRESS HASE ENGLAND. March A 23-year-old Getman who fled lo the United States five years ago told today, with te.irs in his eyes but wilh bitterness toward the Nazis. K how hr participated in the bombing of his home town in Southern Ger- many. A waist -dinner on an Amejican bonibrr. he must remain anonymous since the Germans hold his brother in a concentration camp, ft 11 was a sad but thrilling exper- ience as he looked clovn on Ihe ttrect.s he knew. For r. moment, he faid. he felt homesick, then remem- bered his mother, father and two sisters slain by the Gestapo and his brother, a Gestapo prisoner, fr This was his story ol his first trip over Germany: had m p.irticnhr reaction when 1 firsl heard what Ihe target wnnld be but as   Earl Bnckncr Crawford of Stamford and Capt. Heston Mc- Donnell of Lamesa. Lieutenant Valentine, n-hose wife Ihe former Elizabeth Hale lives at 790 Ross, received the medal for extraordinary achievement while participating In flights which in- cluded dropping supplies and tran- sporting troops lo advanced posi- tions. A former member of the 43th Di- ilsion. Lieutenant Valentine is sta- tioned in New Guinea with the Fifth Air force troop carrier command. Lieutenant Valentine has been on leave In Australia, he wrote Mrs. Valentine. She had not been in- formed ol his citation. Son of Mr. and Mrs. S. E. Craw- ford of Stamford and a former stu- dent of Hardin-Simmons univer- sity. Lientenanl Crawford also re- ceived the DFC. Citation from Admiral W. V. Hal- sey. commander of Hie Pacific flcel accompanying the award read: "For heroism and extraordinary achievement while participating in an aerial attack asnlnvl the enemy as pilot of a fifhter plane dnrine the raid on Japanese wcrships in the stronsiy forli'ieri harbor of Ra- bjul. New Britain Nov. S. 1913. "Lieulcnanl Crawford followed his division leaner into terrifically heavy and accurate anti-aircraft fire fol- lowing his particular ot tor- pedo planes. With utter disrejard of Ills personal safety and Intent only with the of ir.e flroup he was yirntrcttng In and out again, ire approached, dived and pulled o-.it with them, dodging anti- aircraft burst and beating off enemy nntil the attack COT.- plr-lcr! ar.d the danzcr over. "His daring ability contributed largely to the succr-.ss the attack both in enabling the bombers and torpedo planes to concentrate on their respective targets free of fight- er opposition and In protecting the ing their way up Monastery ti-lo-i victory were only 7 slmit lill and seemed lo be nca of their all-lime one day re- cord of 83 German lighters downed attacks on Berlin earlier this mouth. Tlie Brussels radio Irfl Ihe air late lonight, Indicating HIP RAF iniKhl be carrying the attack Into another night. Berlin salrt tht Anirrir.ui iar- Ifrls, Immhed through douiK Km Ihe alrcrall city of AIIJS- tmrir anil the anclrnl earrisnn town nf nd nnl TIAAi: Pjnll I riifjij nlchl ind Silurdi.t. Tr.jirrnui KIS All Utrf. Horn Thqrv I' iJ H 1 -.1 I IS i: I! HI..... rj it FRENCH UNDERGROUND WAGING FIGHI AGAINS1 VIOLATORS OF MORAL LAWS BV TAV1.0K IIRNRY Prr'.'i f orrrspnnrfrnl who rfAcbrri Immr Thurfrtay ahnarri Ihp nflrr A jrar in a firrm.in itilcrnmrnt camp, former- ly of ralr.slinr. Trv.. he was ror- rrspondrnl in anil Vichy, and HAS ronnrclimn Ihroiiehrii.L IA lit n II .'.I 1! Ilith ind UM Irmnrnlui" p. in. j: >nd 11. hi And Snnvl U.I nitkl M> funrnr IkU mftrnii-c: Ihnlthl: ;.lt. NEW YOIJK. NT.irrh -.France's "M'n Idr 1 only arr fizhUr.j Ihclr country's internal ftsftintl Oprman (V-- OUirr story nn acr KUht. nnd their Vichy bn' lautichrri ft IK-W or ccmnton pur.- i.'Umcnis of known violators of mor- al ami criminal laws. This nrw ckvrlopmmt in ihr Ficnch umtorsrounrt cnmpAign lift.1; by thr riisrc- into which Frrucli Vichy j Eaiirti Tlir rmninon iitnn in F'rAnrc (r.ripv lins Injl con- fidrncc in a frijrr which ha.1 llsfll umblr tn rical wave f'l crinir jet oft in Fr.ince hy tlir scarcity of food. j clothes and monry CAIIKd bv the IGrrman nu'iipatfon. One nt il-.r most Mflrllinp phn.i-fis this devrlopirirut o{ tlip is that the j 1 Men rif the Pa- triols who h.ise i.iken lo the I lo [tsht itic Vichy collaborationists i execute Mimnmy Justice nn any j woman -isstKiaTine with trixips. I Thr pur.i.-hment to fil j the case. Tlu- most pum.-h- n-.tnt for an unrmrncd girl known: lo he friendly with Gfrmnn .'oMirrs is for her to be kidnapped by a j terrori.1.! hand Irom th? have lirr head halt jhavrd and then be tururd in tlif ot her home town as an object of scorn. A nunifri will all hair sliced off her head. whUe wnmrn whose are war prisonrrs in often ate sentenced To by a fuinft 5Qtiad and the with warniri; pinned to Ihe bicast. Thr hair sentence is aJw> frequenUy earned o'.it on who have In prison lor too friendly relations mi Hi oilier Frenchmen. In such CAS- ex execntini of the yenlence. Is usu- ally uniil Ihe well-Oman- nndcrprotiud has been able to comnujr.icAte with Hie husband and oh t Mn npprnvM. which is gen- frally forthcoming   

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