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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: March 14, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - March 14, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                SCORE ON RED CROSS DRIVE County quota Contributioni Monday Clirriburioni to dole Sttlene Reporter WITHOUT OR WITH OI'KKNSK TO FRIENDS OR FOES SKETCH YOUR WOULD EXACTLY AS I VOL. LXIH, NO. 271 A TEXAS NEWSPAPER ABILENE, TEXAS.TUESDAY MORNING, MARCH 14, 1944 -TWELVE PAGES Associated Press IAP) United Press IV.r.I PRICE FIVE CENTS Japanese lake Licking in Heavy Ground Fighting on Bougainville Trapped Nips Fail in Break Through Iry By REMBKRT JAMES Press War Writer ilcavy ground fighting re- sulting in a bitter defeat for the Japanese broke out Sat- urday on Bougainville island in the Solomons where more l4hn desperate Japa- nese have been isolated foi weeks. Gen. Douglas MacArthur said that more than one-third of the attacking force of three or four thousand men died in n suicidal effort to break through the American perimeter at Empress Augusta Bay. The battle lasted al day. For several days previously, the Japanese had bttn shelling; the perimeter, trying to knock nut American airfields from which ..Hied planes have hrtn taking off to jive Rabaul, Xtv Britain, an almost daily blast- ing Presumably the Japanese, whose withdrawal from Bougainville has (Please turn to Page 3 more more details of Bou- Kherson REDS EX1END TIME ON STOCKHOLM. Tuesday, Mar. Russia was understood, to quit [he war on conditions substantially the same as those tendered today to have given Finland a few more days to accent her Armistice the Finns at their request about three weeks ago. The peace crisis was described In Informed quarters here as "getting terms in a stern answer to the week-old Finnish request for an oppor- tunity to negotiate conditions under which Finland would quit the war. A heavily censored message from Edwin Shanke, Associated Press correspondent in Helsinki, hinted at "dramatic developments" within the next few days and suggested that the Finnish government must make a decision at a scheduled parliamentary session or face severe consequences. The exact nature of the reply Moscow made yesterday to the Finnish counter proposals is unknown hut It was strongly indicated that Russia stood lo all purposes on its original principal demands tiiat Finland in- terne German troops in the country, withdraw to her ]940 borders and repatriate Russian prisoners. Russia's reply was believed to have offered Finland one last chance tougher" for Finland every hour. Neither government, however, was believed to have dosed the door tb eventual agreement. While official Finnish circles in Sweden were said to have expressed regret that Moscow had failed to accept what the Finns regarded as mod- erate counter suggestions, nonetheless, strong hope remained that a so- lution could be reached. (A Uuidoii broadcast, quoted the Finnish radio as saying Iliat Rus- sian forces "are concentrating in the Murmansk area" against Col. Gen. Eduard Dletl's German troops In Northern Finland, men Moscow has asked Helsinki to inlern or wipe out with Soviet help. The broadcast was recorded by to R German Dead, Captured loll Hits 15, ussians been Impossible since Allied occupa- tion o! Green island between Sou gainville and Rabaul on Feb. '14 hoped to capture the air fields. thousands of miles tc the northeast in the Central Pa cific, American planes made thei 15th raid of the war on Wake is land. Adm. Chfstfr W. Nimllz Slid Army and hit the Japa- nese defenders. of Wake with 50 jjn'i'of explosives. rallw wnl of...'Pear! Harbor. Other American planes attacked Ikree Japanese bases in the east- ern Marshalls. and still others struck at Nauru Island, strategic Japanese base 7CO miles due south of the Marshal's. Admiral Nimitz said there was enemy air interception over any ot the targets, and that all Amer- planes returned. The Wake raid was the first since February 28. Nauru, last hit on March 5, hart been raided 13 times before. On Bougainville, the Japanese Wegrnphed their, punch several days previously by smarming up close to American lines at Empress 'Augusta Bay and pushing In tor several sharp skirmishes. The Bougainville action -the highlight of General Mac- Arthur's communique, which told, however, of new gains on the Admiralty Islands in the Bismarck sea, and of heavy air smashes at Rabaul, anil at We- wak, New Guinea. the Admiralties, American cav- alry units that have taken most of Los Negros Island with Its Im- portant Momotc airport, seized tivn nearby islets and got that much closer to Japanese-held Manus Is- land, largest of the group. Civilian Outfits Ordered for Tommies LONDOX, March 13 -OP.-civil-} ing here in th.it capacllv Jifarch An oulfils for men. com-; 15. 1542. pletc from hats to shoes, have been' Italo Fighting At Standstill ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Na- ples, March oper- ations in Italy have come to an almost complete standstill, with both sides so deeply mired in cling- ing Italian mud that only the op- posing artillery Is able to maintain the battle. Allied artillery put in a heavy day yesterday shelling German troop concentrations-and gun posi- tions around the rim of the Anzio beachhead, considerably increasing its volume of fire, but otherwise ac- tion was limited strictly'to the aer- ial campaign against Field Marshal Albert Kesselring's supply lines. British Beaufighters flit two Ger- man supply ships off. the Spanish coast, beaching one arid leaving the other- In .sinking, condition-an. an- immcement said. .'_ (A' German termed this attack "a violation of interna- tional and identified the sun- ken vessel as the German refrigerator ship Kirissi. It said 10 crewmen were killed and 15 wound- Allied naval forces in the Adri- atic were reported to have sunk [wo enemy vessels last Friday and Sat- urday nights. In nil, the Allied air force Hew some 300 sorties yesterday, without losing a plane. One German plane was destroyed. RED CROSS FUND PASSES FAR SHY GOAL Taylor county's Red Cross war fund total inched to Monday night, still shy (he half-way mark- cam- paign officials had sought by last Saturday and almost 000 under the county quota. Chairman Kd Stewart listed the day's donations at and named new firms in the group of those whose officials and employes have contributed a hundred per cent. 2d Grand Jury Returns 4 Bills 'A' Gas Ration May be Reduced WASHINGTON, March A gasoline ration cut.for "A" card holders' in the west as a possibility tonight, holding them down to the two weekly gallons allowed motorists on Ray Hardwick Quits L-Board Riy Hardwick, deputy upervlsor of (lie 26-county Abilene Liquor Control board dislrict, yesterday re- vealed that he liad to ac- cept, a .position with the attorney general's office at Hnrdwick, u-Iio has been with the Liquor Control board for several years, will leave his office this month. His duties in the attorney generals office begin April 1. The officer began work in Abi- lene district inslS31 and since that time has been active with the de- partment throughout Ihe slate of Texas. He was deputy supervisor of (lie Ltibbock district before rettmi- the eastern seaboard. Western and midwestem drivers now can get three gallons' .a week with their "A" ration. Col. Bryan Houston, deputy ad- ministrator of the Office of Price Administration, said the cut has been advocated by the petroleum administration for war and may be announced when the new fuel otments are set by PAW, possibly .omorrow. Althmih officials contended the change would mean only a small savings in gasoline consumption, PAW Administrator Harold U Ickes has wanted (or a long time to equalize gasoline rations on a tion-wide basis. If the cut is ordered it prabablj will be accomplished by stretching i out the valid period of "A" coupons) to three months instead of the present two. Drastic, nation-wide rcstrctiotis on the use of "R" gasoline coupons for otf-highway vehicles such ns farm be put into 1 in an blaek market that has grown out of their use. Each "R" coupons is good for five gallons and OPA said they were issued liberally with the result that many users got more gasoline than they needed. The surplus has been finding its way into automobile gas tanks. ordered by (he ministry of supply for distribution to British soldiers when they are demobilized. The Weather f. s. or COMMERCE WE.ATIIF.S nfRE.tl' ABIl.tM. AXn Aid cnlJtr lodjy ch.ntlnrr l> mow In illcrnncn: moilly cloadv and much cotrter UnlcM: WtdnetAiv rarllv rUudj, and rjlhfr It ilronr nindi: prolm ilfflnf wrlnrfj ind mnth lempmluTts. TASr Cloadj- wilh rain Tori- colder In ncrlhntal. rain rhanxlnr nrrational mow In afternoon: moillv ftutlr and fftlder Tap.tdaf nfrht. mnch rVlder tn and tinrlh, wilfc occa- fn tnnlficau and rxlremr (ail: IVfdnnday patllj- clovdj and talhrr cnld, Ift strong uindv pinlrfl lirf'lerV Tundjr nlchl ajalnil flinnr ninrti and mvch colder trm- rionjy rain and cold In and Soolb Plains nilh rain chanrinjr lo SO.OTT early ron- and much cottier nichl: rain In TecAi valley. eaU or Ihe Pecos rliet and in Tlr! PaM area; WednMdar partly elourty and ccldcr. strong in and frcth ftronr elit- .flVrt: proljrl AM Son. 1IOIB Mon. PM Son. 14 i 11 and 1C. >n4 lamt and 18. fySiintfl lat! nitM: VI llm mflTninf: Burner lontfM; ;i nith lo peralarri dale hit The Abilene district includes six army installations. In announcing his resignation. Hardwick said that liis record here was made possible through coop- eration of oil law enforcement agen- cies. He cited cases of splendid co- ordination between the Liquor Con- trol board mid city, comity, slate and army personnel. effect by the OPA April i effort to dry up a gasoline] Stewart and Assistant Chairman Roscoe Blanken- ship still were confident Ihe county would raise its quota, but they urged more diligence on the part of vol- unteer workers. 1st ad Red Cross "A number of people have not turned tn money solicited and many- others have not been able to work like they should have because, ot the weather" Stewart pointed out. "We want all reports made as soon as possible and.campaigners who have not worked their.areas are urged to do so at once." Blankcnship said the percentage of turn-downs on requests for con tributions had been minute. "It is just a case of contacting individuals" he pointed out. "No- bcdy or at least only a small num- ber flatly decline to contribute.' Among Monday's donations was one from Jvt. John Womble, former Abilene chamber of commerce manager now stationed at Camp Ctowder, Mo. Private Womble wrote: "We don'1 keep up much with the outside worJd here but I do know it's time for the annual Red Cross drive and I to keep my record clear my name on the Ust. We have seen some swell moving pictures o! what the Red Cross is doing and I have personally witnessed some cases they have handled." Three of the multiple classifica- tions listed on the large report- board by the WAC-shack. Red Cross temporary headquarters, are mark Scr- RED CROSS, TIT. 3, Col. 2 Eleanor Arrives in Dutch Guiana PARAMARIBO. Surinam, almos, 13-HV Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt American douehboj. arrived today at an airfield in Sur- j for the Invasion-remained idle i SWEETWATER, Mar. theft, embezzlement and forgery In- dictments aere returned today against four men by Nolan county ,rand jurors o! the 32d district court. Herbert Joe Allison and John Han-lings were Indicted, each on two separate counts, for car theft, and Lymvoori Woodrow Wilson, a former Sivcetivater resident appre- tieudcd In Oklahoma, was Indicted for forgery. A bill for embezzlement was re- turned against Edwin Green, for taking approximately from service station where he was cm- j ployfd. Green, who already faced a burg- lary charge of several months standing and was free under bond on that count, conspired with a juvenile to stage-the robbery, Act- ing District Attorney B. L. Tem- plcton said. Case of the other boy already has been handled by Ju- venile court. Temuieton said the men indict- ed would be arraigned Tuesday morning before Judge A, S. Mauzty and he expected Pome v ould enter guilty pleas and be tried. Allison and Rowlings, both 17. are part of a miniature "gang" of youths charged in Taylor, Nolan and Howard counties with car llielt and in Howard county for burglary. LONDON, Tuesday, Mat', Gen. Rodion Y. Mali- novsky's Stalingrad veterans j wiped out a panic-stricken German garrison at Kherson yesterday, capturing that Axis Black sea base at the mouth of the Dnieper river and boosting the toll of Ger- man dead and captured to in 10 days, Moscow an- nounced at midnight. .Striking with crushing speed 22 miles down the west bank of the il I stopping supply flow lo Noiilroopi .D ARMY AIMS TO 'STRANGLE' Line shading (led in panic" into Kherson. Then on map above area hcltl hy Itcil army north of "1C Dniclicr Son region; white ar- I rows lo BOil1 o{ (lrive toward Rumanian slaughtered those who so'.ight to complete encirclement ot Germans behind their last lines Apology for Story Error Coal Miners In England idle LO.NIXW. March 30.000 of Britain's striking coal miti-'. crs returned lo work today while others ignored the appeals of the government and (heir own union leaders alike as the strike went into Its second week. In Wales dozens of the biggest pits in the of them The Reporter-News regrets and wishes to apologirc to Is'olan County, Attorney Charles T, Nunn and any oilier persons at- feclcd by the Hem, for an error in a slory appearing in the Sun- day morn hie edition, The slory stated 32d district court would investigate "a com- plain I against a local rilling station operator nlio, Ihr slate claims, helped plan a SROfl rob- bery of his dun business." Il should JMVC rend Ihat the com- plaint was agaimt an "attend- ant" at the. station and not flit operator. Tlic mistake arose when a re- porter misiiiitlerstood Ihe county attorney in telephone conversa- tion and Mr. Nunn has in formed the Kcforter-Ncns that the sta- tion operator was in no way in- volved In the alleged robbery. make p. stand, satd the bulletin re- corded by the Soviet monitor. Other units under Mallnov- sky cap. ij red Galganovka on the Ingulcts river just 35 miles east of NIkolaev, Ihe next big ob- jective In his troops, Nikobcr is 35 mile? northwest of Kher- son, and also is threatened tiy Soviet forces Ust reported only 28 miles north of the Moscow dispatches said .the Ger- mans were even throwing away iheir light, packs in flight. The Russian Malfnovsky's troops alone had kill- ed 20.000 Germans and capturert in a week, not counting the Axis troops cut down at Kherson. Great quantities of equipment also were seized. Far to the northwest In old Po- land a new Russian thrust south- cast ol Tnmopol found Red army troops reaching a point about, 50 miles Iron] the Rumanian frontier and about 100 miles ftom the east- em tip ot the old Czcclia-Slovuk- border. Not yet able to lake Tarnopol fronlaUy the Russian ap- peared to be resorting to their fa- vorite device of Euceciing around their goal. Kherson fell after a sharp street fight and Premier-Marshal Joseph Stalin's order ot Ihe day termed it "a large Junction of rail and vralcr communications and an Important slronRpoint in German defenses at Ihe mouth of the Ulver Dnieper." The capture of Kherson, tak- en hy the Germans in the fall ol 1911 a feu- months after they attacked opened (he tray for coordinated lied army drives on the next Black objectives, the of Nl- kolacv, 3s northwest of Kherson, and Odessa, 90 miles of Kherson.  Pennsylvania She S Bjq WilHICr might soon issue, a statement clari- to the Senatr blocked! 3 tying deferment policy. j the linv at Jean conMdrra-: CUMMER. W.i-li McNult termed the drain en ol a resolution which would; woman oalmlv scvi-iai ir.unnu am, u.. jam. dustrial manpower "a serious have Riven the judiciary commit-.303 eif Iho to! phs'.ic tokens j Colonel Thra-.nsen. who was rcar- tion" but gave no details uf the the right to survey all nrcsi-. used for rr.ca: change on j cd in Hoivtsviilc. is a brother ol tlcipateii announcement. Oth cr, denlbl esecinlve orders "with part-, a buirlier's Dr. If. Thoniiison of lort Worth sources Indicated, however, it would iieuhr regard to the source of con-: "I s.it in .1 gar.ie I His son. also in service is stationed make absolutely clear that fathers or executive ar.d we used tiieie for chips.1 she' in Washington. D. c. arc to Ret no special consideration' Barklcy said he wanted to study the astounded m.irkct keep-[ Ur. Biss Ins received no details on dcfcrn-.cnls. it some more. cr. ot the colonel's death.   

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