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Abilene Reporter News: Monday, March 6, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - March 6, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                 FIRST IN WEST TEXAS  /OL. LXIII, NO.  W^t    MORiMiiviG  WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO FRIENDS OR FOES WE SKKiCH YOUR WORLD EXACTLY AS IT GOES”-B\ ron    -  A TEXAS a-A>V NEWSPAPÍR  ABILENE, TEXAS, MONDAY MOENING, MARCH 6, 1944 EIGHT PAGES  United Press ru.Pj PRICE FIVE CENTS  Soviets Launch New Offensive  EISENHOWER URGES ALITO COOPERATE FULLY  LONDON. March 5—(Æ0—General Dwight D. Elsenhower, saying that "only a self-disciplined Army can win battles.” told American forces in Britain tonight it is vital that they work with the British “both Ifcn the fighting services and in civil life on the basis of mutual respect, consideration and cooperation."  •'Thii means we mast earn and keep their respect as a great military machine dedicated to the single Jfask of doing our duty in winning inis war." the supreme Allied commander said.  HLs order was laid down in a unique letter addressed “To E%’cry American Serving Under My Com  mand.”    ,  The duty of every company commander. he said, is to know æ11 his men. iheir qualifications, their problems, their habits and their personalities.  *'Hc must protcci them and Insure to each a chance to serve Intelligently and usefully in the cause tor which our country is engaged*in this war.”  Every high commander. Eisenhower continued, must sec that justice prevails and that "every enlisted man and enlisted WAC or civilian employe understands the right of legitimate appeal from what  may be considered capricious or arbitrary punishment.”  “On my assurance that our success in battle and our chances to return home safely and speedily arc directly affected by our success In establishing here a reputation as a first class, disciplined fighting organization. I ask each of you, particularly the officers, to be especially carcful concerning;  “Improper use of motor transportation.  “Drinking in public places. “Excessive drinking at any time. In this connection public drunkenness by officers will invariably call for the .sternest disciplinary ac-  tlon permissible.  “liOUd profane or Indecent language. especially in public.  “Slovenliness in appcarance.  “Any discourtesy to civilians.  “I stress again the constant need for road courtesy on the part of all drivers of United States Army cars.”  He asked the help of all to sec that a very small minority did not damage the good name of the American Army in the United Kingdom” and closed the letter:  “Wtlh deep appreciation to each of you for duty well performed in i bases hinted toda the past and with the best of luck." ’    niiiiLa luaa  Ponape Hit Again With Big Bombs  Rout 12 31 Miles  'Jazi Divisions, Gain on 112-Mile Front  Jargets Over France Hammerec  .RAF HITS BERLIN AGAIN AS RESISTANCE WEAKENS  LONDON. Mar. 5—(AP)—Liberators of the U. S. Eighth Air Force bombed a Gei'inan fighter and bomber base at Cognac, in Southwestern France, with good results today and also attacked Bergerac and other enemy localities in the -same area, U. S. headquarters announced tonight.  • Fourteen enemy aircraft  were shot down by the fighter escort made up of Thunderbolts. Mustangs and Lightnings of the Eighth Air Force •and Mustangs of the Ninth Air Force, it was stated.  The number destroyed by bombers wfi5 not immediately tabulated.  Four Liberators and five fighters failed to return. jA Tlie assault on Prance, fourth •^^rna-jor operatlQiu.iil*'^UC^^ys V. S. heavy bombers—followed on the heels of another attack bn Berlin last night by RAP Mosquitos which hit the German capital soon after announcement Saturday of H the first American raid ever made on It—a daylight foray by Flying Portresses. .  The Liberators punch into Southwestern Frances was accompanied by an all-day offensive against the ^Pas-de-Calais- coast of Northern ^ Prance.  Marauders shuttled back and forth during most of the daylight hours. RAF Typhoon fighter bombers hit the same A area in the morning and in the ™ afternoon the Typhoons returned along with RAF and Canadian Spitfires.  These lighter planes roared across the channel in waves totaling more A than 200 planes in uhat was described officially a.‘ intermittent attacks."  Virtually no enemy fighters seen durmg any of thce.s oi>erations. although unusually heavy flak was reported and one Marauder wa-'; #fihot down.  Crews .said they saw bomb crater.«? pitting the target area and columns of smoke rising.  The Liberators and their es-^ cort bucked both a strong hcad-» wind and rockets to carry their attack to the N'ar.is’ “second line of defense,” the airfields of Southwestern France.  The two targets named were In the vicinity of Bordeaux—  ^ Cognac 70 miles ^o the north  •series  View Surpasses Red Cross Quota  Hitting for a goal of twice the amount of money raised last year, the View community repor^d* yw-tcMay it^a.\ready had toppcdMt* $300 Red "cross "quota for 1944 and was’still going for more money.  Saturday night totals contributed hit $303 and Grady .Pctree, local chairman, said he believes enough will be collected to double the $175 quota and contributions of 1943 “We still have several persons to see and there is no doubt everv'one will do his part and at least $350 will be collected here before tlie drive ends.” he said.  Charles Rutledge, rural chairman in the Taylor county Red Cross drive, cited Trent’s topping of its goal Saturday and View's action as Indicating every quota will be met promptly.    *  “I’m very enthusiastic about the outlook.” he said. “If Trent and Vi£w can surpass the goals, then every other community can also and the example set is worthy of note.“  'mayennc  FRANCE'  By REMBERT JAMES  Associated Press War \Vriter New attacks on the Eastern Caroline islands by American planes evidently using land that Adm  Chester W. Nimitz has put to use his newly conquered air fields in the Marshall islands.  Tlie Na\T reported that 23 tons of bombs were dropped March 3 Ponape, Japane.se base 440 miles east of the big enemy naval station at Truk, and that other planes attacked Kusaie. southeast of Pon-aix* and the easternmost island of the entire Caroline group, and Japar)ese-held islands in the Marshalls.  Ponape and Kusaie wcro raided by four-mglned Army and Navy Liberators. It seemed highly probable they took off from cither KwajaJeln, 57G nautical miles from Ponape and 348 miles from Kusaie. or from Eniweiok. less than 400 miles from each of the Japanese-held targets. Kwajalein has been in American hands a fufl month.  It was the ninth raid within three weeks on Ponaoe. and the 10th raid on Kusaie since Jan. 17.  Tlie increasing frequency of air ! to the Russian communique, record attacks on these islands .suggested 1 ed hero by the Soviet monitor. The that the big bombers were operat- I transports sunk were of 8,000 and  BATTERED AGAIN—Points in various parts of France were weekend targets of Allied bombers operating from England. Indication was gi\^n heavy activities were carried far beyond the rocket coast, as well as at Cognac and other points.  some found stiff  fighter opposition $ T^'o U. S. Eighth Air Force Mustang pilots. Lt. Howard Hlvely of Ward. W. Va., and Capt. G. V. Davi.«; of Parma. Idaho, reported Caot. Duane W. Bee-Idaho  14th  ▼ Tlie RAP’s fleet Mosquitos  had hit the German capital Friday night.  The official announcement of today’s raids by the Liberators said the targets A Stead of m  Mrs. Beasley Rites At 10:30 am. Monday  STAMFORD. March 5 (Spl.1 — Funeral of Mrs. Clovis Beasley will be held at St. Kevins Catholic church here Monday at 10:30 a.;n.  Mrs. Bea.sley. former society editor of the Stamford .American, died in Vancotiver. Wash.. Monday after a brief illness.  In Sundays Reiwrtcr-Ncv.r. it was incorrectly stated that the funeral of Mrs. Beasley would be held at 2:30 pjn. Monday.  Convenfion Called  BAIRD, March 5 (HW)—April 13 has been set for the Mid-West  much that more towns in the might be constrained to join the ai^sociation. It now has only .six.  *Says Finns Seeking Permission to Quit  ^ LONDON. Mar. 5—The Mos-^cow radio repeated without comment tonight a Stockholm dispatch reporting that Finland has rejected Soviet  rder to protect Its policy of wait and .see.” the dlsp i*^the broadcast.  The Weather  «íd<Tnhí«-    in rjtnhanrflr tné  Íírrhl/”c'ílVír Ti'iïiî.rr'’'Îr"l.H’"îlv’p^  .....  Tr'Mrr.KATUB|V"''''^^  Air Base Pilot )ies in Crash  An Abilene Army air base pilot was killed Sunday aftcnioon about 2 o’clock wlKn hLs P-47 plane crashed in the Laney ranch pasture three miles east of Merkel His name was withheld ponding notification of nearest of kin. and air base authorities did not reveal any details of the accident. Report of investigating officers had not been made last night.  The flier was reported to liave bctn on a combat training mLs.sion in his Thunderbolt ship wiicn ihe accident occurred. The plane plunged Ihe ground and burned, only  LONDON, Monday, Mar. 6— (AP) — Moscow announced last night ti«at the Red army had opened a mighty new offensive in the Western Ukraine and in two days fighting routed 12 German divisions—perhaps 160,000 men—killed at least 6,000 Nazis and swept up more than 500 localities in a drive into Southern Poland that threatened the vital Odesso-Lwow railway.  The drive was by the first Ukrainian front armies, led by Marshal Gregory K. Zhukov, substituting for Gen. Nikolai K. Vatutin, who was announced ill.  Premier Marshal Joseph Stalin, in a special order of the day, and two Soviet communiques—all recorded by the Soviet monitor from broadcasts—pictured a powerful Soviet smash which shattered the German defense, broke through on a 112-mile front and moved forward up to 31 miles.  Stalin said the Soviet vanguard was now fighting at the approaches to the rail station of Volochisk on the Odessa-Lwuw railway, 60 miles north of the Rumanian frontier. Capture of this station would sever the only important rail line supplying the Germans in the Dnieper bend and cut off Iheir most jealously guarded artery of retreat.  Over 14 large towns were declared swept up as the Russians advanced southweslward from the Shepetovka area— the southern side of their westernmost salient into old Poland. A front of about 30 miles across the frontier was es-  Red Planes Blast, Sink "hree Ships  LONDON. Manday, March R— r. —Moscow announced today t li a t Russian torpedo and attack planrs sank two transport and a 700-ton minesweeper of a German convoy in the Barents sea yesterday and damaged another tran.^ort.  Tl->e announcement wa.*> made In the broadcast midnight supplomn  Deaths on Hospital Ships of Navy Low  BALTIMORE. Mar. 5~uP) — Tiic mortality rate on U. S. hospital ships has been less than one-half of one per cent. Vice-Adm. Ross I.  Mclntlrc. surgeon general of the U.  S. Navy, said today on an official inspection of the U. S. S. Refuge, the Navy's newest and largest hospital ship.  Expre.ssing great pride in the work already done by Navy hospital corpsmen on their ships and the landing beachcs in combat zones.  Admiral Mclntire. in a broadcast from the office of the ship's commander. de.scribed briefly the Refuge and iLs personnel.  Tlio on?-tlme luxury liner, cargo 5>omc .scraps of metal rcmainins as vessel and troop transport Is unlike I evld?ncc of the crash a few hours the u.-^ual Navy ship for a specific | later,  purpose. the admiral .said. The AUhough a number of pcr.snns Refuge will travel -fullv lighted at Mining in Ihc vicinity arrived at ihe night and at all times unescorted." ! scene, a mile south of U. S. Huh-  Although the commanding offi- ! way 80. shortly after the plane icll, cer and senior medical officer arc 1 no eyewitnesses could be located, veteran Navy men. in the main the Body of the pilot was brought to  Ing from nearby bases.  Tlie Japanese also felt the sting of fresli reverses In the South and Southwest Pacific.  General Douglas MacArthur said that dismounted American cavalrymen on Los Negros island In the Admiralty group were cleaning out thfr enemy ringing their positions around strategic '-Momote airport, from which Allied planes can cover large sweeps of the Bl.smarck sea.  American reinforcements were landed on Los XeRros, where the Japanese already have loat 3.000 killed and wounded In a work of fighting. Amerirnn destroyers shelled a harbor on adjacent Manus island to prevent transfer of relnforccmcnti on Los Negros.  personnel is composed of doctors, dentists, nurses and enlisted men not long removed from civilian life.  Dies Group Hit  Elliott’S chapel here.  WASHINGTON. March b The National Lawycr.s guild described operations of Dies committee as a 'conspiracy " against war poUcios of the adininLstvation and the United Nations today in callinc on Congrr.ss to pul an end to Ihe oup's work.  Forced Landing  BRECKENRIDGE, March 5 • Spi.I—Motor trouble was said to be rr.six>nsiblc for ihc forced landing Hlx>iit 3:30 p.m. Siindav of a Na\v plane in a pa.'^turr 13 miles .south of BreckenridKc.  Piioi. Lt. 'jK. W. R Hanson, who.sc home Ls in Brooklyn. v»,a.s uninjured. Little damage to the plane was reported.  Along the New Guinea coast, heavy bombers dcstroyrd or damaged IS* Japane.se planes on the ground at Wewak.  Rabaul. New Britain, tackcd by Allied plane.s again and for the first time in almost three weeks the Japanese '«rnt up fighter planes in a weak effort to beat off the attack.  Lt. Gen. Joseph W, stilwclls Chinese troops ha'c captured Malngkwan village in the Hukwana valley ol Northern Burma. More than 80 Japane.se wore killed in a bitter jungle fight. Siiiweii'.s communique added. Allied airmen, last Friday and Saturdav. made 500 sorties to cover operations on the Burma fronts.  the  6.000 tons displacement bulletin said. The damaged transport was listed at 7,000 tons.  Earlier the German propaganda agency. International InforMiation Bureau, reported that RvLsslan planes had attacked a German «ronvoy off tlie Northern Norwegian coa^t Jiist south of Vwiihgcr peninsula Sundfty, but that "It ci=aped.^ unharmed.  Neither Moscow nor Berlin brought out w’lcther the vessels were hca,ded ea.M or west or whether the transports were loaded or in ballast. H'hc sea route is one which Hitler s high command could lUie cither to withdraw or to reinforce Na/.i divi.sjon.s ui northern Finland, which Russia has demanded that Finland round up as one of the conditions for peace.  The German account .raid escorting fighter.s kept the Russians from .scoring hlt.s and that the convoy “continued its voyaRc unharmed.*' Varanger penln.sula is at the very I tip of Norway and i.<? bordered by a .small .strip of the .shore of Finland.  The German report did not identify the character of the convoy.  A later Berlin broadcast said that British torpedo planes al.so had made an attack on a .small German convo.v oil Llne.snae.s. Jicar the entrance of the Skaaorrnk, and had hit one .‘-liip. “whlcli, however, was soiling close to the coast and reach-  tablished. H miles inside the line at its westernmost point.  The Russian bulletins said the attack began Saturday morning with powerful artillery preparation and "massed fire of Soviet artillerymen and mortar gunners swept away e n e m y fortifications and silenced his firing posi-iloijs... Otjj; I r 0 ops broke through strong German 'défenses XXX under the blows of Soviet troops the enemy left one position after anoth-  Allies Record New Successes On Beáchhead  cd  harbor.*  Committee Plans New Rubber Review  WASHINGTON. March S - -A new review of the coiintry's natural rubber potcniialrun*^ will be undertaken, a House agnculiure .subcommittee promised today, with a view to averting any rubber shortage such as the nation faced  after  Nazis Claim Newer Bombs Much Better  STOCKHOLM Mflr. ,V- r. —llie German.s clnuned todH'. that in the rpn<'wcd bombincs of U)ndon they »re ii.sinK iiru- type.'; o) iioinixr.s and bombs whicli Uurc c.\plasivc cffects five to eicht tunes greater than employed hfretoiore.  ALLIED HEADQUAR. TERS Naples. March 5—'/Ti — American troops have thrown back a battalion of Nazi infantry In a short, fierce battle below Cisterna, headquarters said today, and Allied forces won suCce.sscs In other minor clashes on the beachhead.  The German battalion attacked down the Cisterna-Pontc Rotto road, scoring advances, and the U. S. troops covniterattacked that nlKht. recalninR their pasltions by Saturday morning dc.spitc heavy rc-sl.stanoe and shellfire. Tlie first was e.speclally hard near a brldRC two miles soutlnvest of Cisterna. One Nazi tank wa.s knocked out.  Bri(i.s!i troops cleaned up a pocket of inflltrallng Germans .southwest of Carroceto. killing 15 and capturing 23 including; two company commanders, and patrols In this art'a and at other bcachhcad point.«! hit into Nazi pasltions. Inflicting ca.sualtles and seizing prisoners.  The British C ruiser Maurlllu.s shelled Ciprmau gun and troop roni'cntrallons nine times Friday night with ‘most effective results.” Headquarters ssid unloading of supplies at Aot.Io ron-ilniiciJ dr.«.plte new German air attacks and heavy artillery shcllinc-  Ram limned cround fi^iiting on tlir bea<lihrad and Ca.'^.’.ino fronts of the Fiff)) M-JV}. and weather c\ir»ailed air operations to 300 -sorties  In the Ca.'vsino sector. French  The Berlin c arrespondeni of the ‘ t roo{i.s repulsed a Nazi patrol near ] «go Japan had conquered Par Eastern .    nc«.spaper Aftonbladet said ^ m(, San (irnrr. and a New Zealand '  sources.    1 the luftwaffc i.-. vi.siiiR a four-mo- - patrol inlh< icf! lo.s.sos on the pnemv !  The subcommittee, lieaded by , tored bottibor which compares to south of ra.-^sino. The ground was Representative Poagc 'D-Tex>. was ¡ the American Plying Fortress, a ' niudfiv and .some rivers near flood set up primarily to in. (.sliKaie the , .six-motored bomber ))attr*rned after    in till«; arna.  curtailed guayule rubber proKram. ( (he Nüaí transport planr' known a.s , PairolJin« and artillrrv riijel.s but Poage said he had hern In- ' the "Ciir  er.  Describing the battle for the town of Belogorodka, 24 miles southVr’est of Shepetovka, the late bulletin said;  ‘•Particularly stiff fighting raged in the area of Belegorodka. The Germans tried to hold this populated place in their hands at all casts and made several heavy counterattacks, Soviet tankmen, with the a.s.sistance of our infantry. anti-tank riflemen and artiU lerv. routed Uic enemy and put him to flight."  Nlnetv-eight Germans tanks were reported destro>cd.  “A large number of prisoners were taken,*’ the communique saia. “The enemy suffered enormous los.sc.s in''^nanpower and equipment In all scctors of the front. An enormous amount of M-ar material was captured and shattered enemy fllvislons a-hniHloned their artillery ammunition dumps and .other war material In their retreat.”  A Mo.'^-ow \lctory salute of 20 .'^alvos from 224 guns were ordered in celebration.  Zhukhov. second In command to Stalin, ha.s won official recognition for his work as coordinator of So\ let front.s in tlic victory of Stalingrad. the vi<-tory of Moscow, the breaking of the Leningrad siege. He made a marshal about a year  •structed by the full conunittee to two check on the feaslbilif. r.f develoi>- , ea.s; ing other domestic er;irlr rubber iL<; sources.    | 177  These include the kOK'-aKir./ oi- tha “Ru.ssian dandelion” and toiden rod.  vhlch i.^  imhter  mortar  5iit'  htch 1.^ the Fortrrs.-: i;ut f pr of ammunition is deficiency.  lliiiilly t]if Hclllkcl I cro.x hm rm'-tl wltli ic«rr guns ,  .-.Ili:  Most Colorful Parade Scheduled For Abilene Late This Afternoon  ^hailed as 'the biggest colorful parade ever to nere” will move throuph the streets of Abilene late this af-t Fifth and going over many block of the downtown area to officially Inaugurate the 1944 Red Crass campaign in Taylor county.  With the first portion starting at 5 p. m., the parade will be more three miles long and should 1 hour to pass any Iff" Win Watson, has announced, ap elephant, with lurse riding on it.^ head; a truck on which trees and monkeys arc located; several battalions of white and negro soldiers from Camp Barke-ley; 10 bands and corps;- tanks,  jeeps, peeps and other equipment from the I2th .Armored division; and hundreds of Red Cross flags. The popular six white horses of Hardln-Sim-mons university, with girl riders. and members of the .«beriff's posse also will be in line.  •‘There is no doubt this parade will be by far the biggest and most colorful ever to be staged here.” Ed S. SteWart. county Red Cross drive chairman, said. "We expect 50,000 persons to see it. including citizens from every community in Taylor county. This should be .something to be remembered for years and we hope no one who Is able to come do^vntown late today will pass up the opportunity "  The parade will move from F^fth street north on Chestnut through  the underpass, north on Pine to F^fth, west of Cypre.s.s .''Outl^ to North First, and west to Hickory.  Virgil Walrop, chief of police. said t^affic officers early in the afternoon will riear all parked vehicles from streets over which the parade will pass and no aulos win be permitted to travel on the streets during tiie parade hour, ffe asked cooperation of car owners in carrying out the objective.  The elephant and nurse w'lll depict work done by the Red Cross in India, while the monkeys and surroundings will depict Red Cross work in the Jungles. One truck will carry soldiers of several na-tlonahtie.s to show care ls ^lun to all. Hardfn-Simmon.s Cowcirl.^ and Cowgirl band members will carry Red Cross flags, as ^lU oth-  wtil be  Can^p ciaLs of ^no Ai-of the  ers on horsr.s and \cIiicJes. Watson .“iaid onl\ .su< h horsc.s a.s have been cspecia 11 •> de.slunaicd will be lirrmitted in the parade.  Riding in the stal:  MflJ Ocn. Rov C. Hrfirljowr mandant of the MRTC; Col W. B. Wale.'', commandcr o: Barkelcy and oilier hl^h ofti Camp Barekeley and the-Abil m; air ba.se. Col, Jack Ryan 12th Armored division will be in charge of the unit« of that organization which he has arranged to have on hand.  Tuesday morning the Red Cross solicitations will start to meet the $6f>,000 Taylor county goal. Stewart said yesterday he believes the goal will be reached “but It l.sn’t Roinii to be easy unless every person participates as he should.”  .’¡auk.ii  m.Miillaiinn.s at Porte Civitanova on the Italian cast coa.st. and started i h* station at Tortore-to. Snit tires and Warhaw.s patrolled the hcn<-iilirafl. <Mnd \^'elingston. MHc-lioUs and Airacobras of the irforce pounded shipping  The farthest westward pene-llsted 4-as the 14 miles er and of Tar-clty and  rail center. The farthest southern advance was to \'olochlsk where Stalin said the Red army  Sec RLSSIANS. Pg. 2. Col. 5  and rail tareet.s on the Italian coa.st. Two Allied planes were  \K the day. and one Ger.......  downed off the North African  Lombasts Poles  MO.SCOW, Mar«h    .T—Jacob  Viktorov, a writer for the Rus.<^ian communist or«an Prnvda, declared toda\ that the Poh.'-li Kovernmcnt-an - exile wa.^ scekme to dcstrov United Nation.s' unitv since it took e.xcrption to Prime MinLster Church-iir.s declaration tliat the Soviet union'.s ternis to Poland and jiLst.  Gripsholm Sails With Exchangees  LISBON. Manday. March 6—(JP) -The Swedisli repatriation liner Gripsholm ."tailed from Lisbon at mldnicht with 711 passcnpers. North a n South .^mertoans homeward hound from Germany, occupied countries and neutral Portugal.  They were exchanged for German nationals from the western hemisphere. .\monR the passengers were 36 American war wounded, and 283 fair: diplomats. The remainder were  Painting Started  HASKELL, March 5 — Haskell county courthoiuse is to be repainted throughout the interior. Contract was let by the commissioners* court la.st week Contractor Is Leon Pcarsley.  The courthouse was remodeled in ID30.  ilians. Fifteen were from Lisbon. U-icluding the former Peruvian charge d'affaires. Oscar Bede-vides, his American-born wife and child.  The Gripsholm is due to return to Lisbon from the United States March 29 with more German wounded to be exchanged for American wounded from Germany.  (Previously received Gripsholm story on Tg. 7, Column 6)»-   

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