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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: February 25, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter News (Newspaper) - February 25, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                 WAR BOND SCORE  ^O^er -all quota Total soles Series E quota Series E Soles  $3,245,000.00  4.036.094.00 1,303,000.00  1.313.068.00  Ci)E Abilene 3í^eporter-iBtEtt»¿ SUNDAY  WITHOUT OR WITH OFFENSE TO I RIENOS OR FOES WE SKE'ICH YO('R WORLD EXAC'I LY AS li CO/'S’-Bv  VOL. LXIII, NO. 248  A TEXAS 2.^ NEWSPAPER  ABILENE, TEXAS,SUNDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 20, 1944- —THIRTY-TWO PAGES IN THREE SECTIONS-««ociaied Press mp;  Vnited Prc%s (U.P.)  PRICE FIVE CENTS  m  encans  Beachhead Litterec With German Deac  ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Naples, Feb. 19.—(AP) — American and British troops have carpeted the ground before their Anzio beachhead line with Gorman dead and in f.#r d£iys have wiped out as many as half of some Nazi units ill one of the greatest and most crucial battles of the war. front dispatches reaching here disclosed tonight.  Meeting the German attempt to push them back into the sea with a hurricane of steel. Fifth Army troops fell back ir^one sector but kept their lines intact and prevented a bft'ak-t hrough. The Allied soldiers were fighting doggedly to wear out the Germans.  ^ar Prisoners Must Labor, Says 0en. Somervell  DALLAS. Feb. 19—    —Every  pri.'-nnrr of in the United Slates 5V3hject to labor under the provis-luis nf the Geneva convention will be put to work. It was announced foiiowins a three-day conference of Army Service Forces here.  Lt, General Brchon Somervell, commanding the service forces, said t*#» in view of the manpower shortage, prisoners of war will be put to work wherever possible.  Following this statement. Col. Joseph F- Battlcy. deputy chief of staff of the Army Service forces.  that under the plan formulat-ciTat the conference, every prisoner would be given a Job to do.  The lob.s. he said, would not displace civilian labor and prisoners w'ould not.be used where sufficient iree labor was available.  The work Riven the prisoners, he ekplninert, would be under the terms of the Geneva convention whereby prisoners of war may be put to work at jobs not dircctly concerned with the Avar effort.  ^ Under the Geneva convention. officers are not required to work.  To d;ue pri.-oncrs have been used In acru-ultural and forestry work. ^;nlonel Battlcy said General ^inervell hr^s not been satisfied R-liji Idle pn.''oncrs of war In face of the pres.vini: need for manpower in this loumry.  ' Pnsoncr.s will not be put to work Uisi t(i put- thiMU something to do." li§said. -but they will be constructive. necessary jobs.”  He added that the plan called for niovint the pri.soi\ers to whatever phtc*‘ thev are needed. General i Somervell, in outhning topics of the ct^ference s;nd the followuig had  Against tliem the Gcrmanji have thrown at least four divisions of infantry and armor in this battle on the beachhead front south of Rome.  Allied airmen in a day of intense activity over the bcachhead today shot down at least 17 Nazi planes and probably destroyed five others of the more than 100 enemy aircraft which attacked the British and .^merican ground troop?.  The grim determination of tlie British and American infantrymen at the beachhead wa.'; prai.'^od bv Lt. Gen. Mark W. Clark todav who said that tliese soldiers had risen to new heights of courage and skill in the bitter stnjggle.  He made this statement after another visit to his advanced headquarters at the b^chliead, and said he was inspired anew by the way the Allied Iroops had guarded IheJr position against numerically superior forces. He had praise also for the Fifth Army tankmen and thp^TilUed naval forces engaged ir/the battle.  Ponope  Jokai Harbor.    ^ n,  hm  Palikir  Press In O  ^abaul Bombarded;  Truk  CERTAIN OBJECT OF BOMBS—Ponape. rugged island in the Caroline group mandated to Japan by the League of Nations, is one of the strongest Nipponese bases between the Marshalls and Truk. With the capture of Engcbi yesterday it is certain to receive much bombing, as Engcbi is within easy distance for use of land-based planes.  Campbell's Sold To Oklahomans  , ber  taken up.  1.    Pcisonncl problems, both mililiiry ;ind rivilian.  2. (Jurvtion^ of security.  2.    Uays of strppiuE up the Urneral trahnns program and ''steppinR up the tempo of mov-  hiR men overseas. Some train-inu periods are being shortened.  4. Reduction of inventory as mueh as possible. Quality of ^nanagement would be increased the quantity of stocks and r<nilpmeiU «ere depleted.  Pji)blrj)r re.spcct to funds novMhle economy measures  3    «ne  ^ t ^11    III I It  Pvohlrt  4    Thr l.Mtri  Mken of clrniobihzat  di:  isseci  ............. uencral Somervell said.  ‘4 Hridimt thui firmobiliz.ation Impro-i vi.vWMii.s nrcr.s.sary aller fiir la.si 3 wrtr will not be necei..sary after this i 1^,- provided that long range plan-? ning i.s done.  i -We plan for war years ahead In • time of peaco,” he said. “In time of wnr, we are planning months ahead  f for pe;ice-"  ^    Vu-K.r W. B. Wales, com-  niiuulrr of Camp Barkcley. said last nipht a? far as It was known here there    he no change in opera  tion of !hr prisoner of war camp pi Barkrley because of plans work-'^out at thr Dallas conference. He fà'Ki encli of the small number of pij'^oners at Camp Barkclcy have . been n.s.signed work, m line with current orders on the subject, ac-i tivities including a limited amount E o^ work on farms near Abilene.  "'Denton Youth Hurt ^In Auto Accident  Rchvrircl Oibbs. IB. of Denton, wa.'i Hnifinrkv Memorial ho.-pital t ninlu siifirnng from head in-•ir following an automobile ac-irni vestrrday afternoon, virs Homer Gibbs, mother of the tim. said last night she knew little of the accident with thè ^exception that her .son, his w'ife and r-Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Peters, all of Denton, were between Abilene  ËI Lubbock when the accident oc> ed,  îJbb.s wa.s not considered in a ^,‘us condition by hospital at-dant£.  arnina that further German [aults could be ex|>ected. Gen. dark ^aid that the enemy was finding It Increasingly difficult to pick' soft spots on the perimeter ofvlhe beachhead.  In the day's air battles over the beachhcad American medium bombers shot down eight out of 20 German planes that tried to ! intercept their bombing of Nazi i .supply dumps around Carroceto. ^ Returning pilot.s said that five more German planes were so badly damaged (hat they probablv cra.shed. The bombers blew up a ga.'oline dump which sent flame.'s spouting 200 feet in the air.  Seven German planes were sliot down bv Briti.«;h fighters and two by American fighter bomber.';.  A dispatch filed from the beachhead at noon today by Daniel De Luce. Associated Press correspondent, summed up the situation as of that moment by saying: “Field Marshal Albert KesselHng’s offensive Is being held."  De Luce had filed a dispatch 12 hour.s previou.sly declaring that Kr.s.selring by the weighi of hi'' inf«ntry-armor blow.^, supi>ortrd b-artillery and air power, had forccd the Allies back in the .sector four miles wide. Tlie correspondent a.s-sertcd. however, that the Allied tioops had prevented a breakthrough and the Germans failed to gain tactically decisive ground On the main front .'^outli of Ca.'i-sino a.s well as on the Anzio beachhead the Allies were engaged in one of tlie decisive battle.s of the war against German forcos brouulii from manv viarts of Europe. A new pliase was indiratrd with a reinforcement of tlie Fifth Arin\ at Ca'<.'«inn bv Indians and New Zealandets brouahi from ?)ie Emiitli .^rmv on the onpo'itr .‘•ide of Itah The character of tlie beachliead fichtinE wa.«; shown in one insianre cited b.v De Luce m ^vhicli an American infantrv unit, althouiih cut off bv German advance.s on both its flank.s, held fa.st for 72 hours without budging an inch. It was still holdlne as De Luce wrote.  Sale of Campbells Department store, one of the oldc.st. largest and most-widely patronized in West Texas, was announced yesterday by T. C. Campbell Sr. and his son. C. J. 'Pati. and T. C. Jr.  The buyers are Fred W. UnU and I Joseph E. Chastain of Guthrie. : Okla.  I It was a ca.sh transaction ai\d. I although the sum Involved was not I disclosed. It w^fts one of thé largest deals of Its kind in the history of ! the city.  I The store, at Third and Cypres.^ I streets, will be closed Monday for ! inventory.  I The sale ended a 41-ycar career i in the department store business in Abilene for the senior Mr. Campbell For more tlian 10 vear.'' his sons have been equal partners uiih him in the busine.s.<^. He came here In 1901 to work lor the Morgan • Weaver rompanv. one of tlie ritys fir.'^i general mcrchaiuiisinc firms, I'hat busines.s wa.' sold aUrr a few months to Minter Dry Goods company, anoilier pioneei institution and Mr. Campbell worked for Miniers for a wliilo before going into busine.ss for Lim.self.  T. (. CAMPBKLL     Mr.    Campbell.    pointinR    out    that      he and lus    sons    ha\e intf    •rests    out-      side t    he store lai    •ger than    that    btis-      ine.ss,    said    iliat    they would    con-      tinue    Iheir    partnei'ship i    opera    lions      aiid open î    1 dow    ntown o!    fice    soon      Thf ir    intei    •ests    con.sist n    lostK    of      land.s    and other    real e.statr    not    onlv      in th    r riiv    and    flii.s ,sc<-n    on biJ! in      other    part.    s of    Texa.s    ind (    -t\ lier      state,^                          “I    have    wati    hed .Mulene    li row      from    a small to    wn.- Mr.    Cam    pbcll      said.    •T an    1 pro    ud of the pro    «re.ss      Abilene ha>    • mad    e and m>    sons    . and      I are    very    apprc    'ciative ol    : the    pro-     tngebi s e l-a s  Daring and vicloriou.s American forces pressed closer to Truk veslerda.v with assault troops, naval Riins and bombers.  Marines captured Engcbi island and its airfield on Kni-wetok atoll, within bomber range of Truk—pivotal point of Japan's central Pacific defenses.  Destroyers shelled Rabaul and Ka\ieng. once mighty fortres.ses on New Britain and New Ireland. Rabiiul was left in flames, shore batteries were silenced, and a d07.cn small vessels damaged. A tanker exploded at Kavieng.  Bombers sank four nicrchanlmen and damaged two destroyers and a tanker at Rabaul. Kight .lapanese and four Allied planes were shot down.  Rabaul and Kaveing are about SOd miles south of Truk where. Tokyo radio .said. “The decisive battle of the Pacific ha.s entered its actual phase at last.”  Capture Sets Up Land Bases For Bombing of Truk  Bv WILLIAAl HIVPUK  u. S. PACIFIC flb:et HEADQUARTERS, Pearl Harbor. Feb. 19--(AP) —With a miRhiy sma.sh Amorican Manno.s captured Engcbi island u’ltli iLs impi)rtarit air base one day after landing on Eniwetok atoll in the Mar-shall.s,  Sr\rral other i.slands in the nurthern portion have also fallen to the Americans.  Admiral Chester W. 'Nimltz so announced today, saving that preliml-narv report,«; indicated American cnsualties have been light. Other i.s-lands of tne atoll <aptured were not named, but islands from that area, include Muzinbaarikku. Yeiri and Ru)i\oru. southeast of Engebi and Boi:on, Bogarinkk, Elupelab and Bo-  Sgt. G. W. Rivers, Tuxedo, Killed  WASHINGTON. Feb IP ~'ITP> — The War Department mad*» public today the names of 190 United States soldiers killed in action, including:  (MEHITERRANKAN AREA) Rlver.s. Sgt, George W.. Jr. — George W, Rivers. Father. Tuxedo. Jones County. Tex.  gres.*- our firm ha.>^ been able to make through this long period”  • We are soiling tlie Moie onh he said, -For some time we have con-iciereci selling thr ret;ul depiuM-ment store lor we knew    oiu in-  terest.s ouusirir th*- ,';!oie hart been nei:lecled. Wr will undrrtnke now  in the year future.”  The .'-tore will for tlie present be ad\erli.sed as CampbelLs Departiin iit ■-lore with tlic words Succeeded liv Lintz Depaitnient Sloit ' adcieci lo the signature, said the new owneis. They stated that tlie- planned to  (lie '  and nrchancii'-e."  ■'I lia\e learned  oftei' the same lines aid Mr Lint ( AMPRKLI/S PaKe i. toi.  German Bombs )amage London  LONDON. Feb 19- V' -Wide-' spread damage was found m half | a do7.en disiruis of London today after waves of German hea\\' and lii:liirr-l)<imbers, facinu a de;idh anti-aiicraft fire. dropi)ed tons <>f explosives and incendiaric'- m thru stronge.'t bid to set Die eapit^l abla/.c .sniee the all-out attacks of 1D40-41  .Several df>/en persons were c(jinit- , e({ dead as a rc.'^uJt of lasr niizht > raid, in winch tlie Germans mav have used as many as l,i(> plan«--There was no official annouiue-ment eitlier of the lotal in\n]\efl,' the number which reache<l l,ondon on ilie number shot down over Bri-  Wiili the dawn Lonfh.n txxan t<' a.-sr^^ Its flain;me The Imnihs hit al Iciist three churi hr>.. i«,, pital,^, a (niivent. an c\r\ (niK-home. sclu.ol building' sit.ir (■iweilint'- and other builfiui::-- Fir*'' ringed the city, lighting tlie Imn/t.n but all weie under contrfil b\’ morn-: ing.  Dozens of iTijured were tnkcn t.i hospitals, and rescuer.s dug ni the debris throughout the chi;, secknii: many t>eheved to be stiH  The first unofficuil repoii- nt German planes shot down hv ground defenses (ame from :i d. -li-lcf where Ameruan ”un ticw-. were in action and whuh rlauned i\ed Tiiree t, ,-of thr nru Mok.     gallua to tiie    northwest      The vK torv    in many wavs rivaled      the hehtning    victory at Kwa.ialcin      atoll 400 mile.«    i to the southea.si      Assaults r    >n other portions of      (hP aioli    are proceeding on      Kchedule, .\dmlral Nimil? said.      Ills announcement did noi Indi-      eate liow n    nuch resistance the      .lapanese offered the .\merican      Invailer^ at    lOneebi with his      ORO-foot air    strip.      The caplun    ^ of BnKebl put.s our      foKes 7.")0 sta    lute miles we.st of tlie      .Japanese- gif    •at foUic.ss of 'I'nik      whi< h was ati    arked b\ a «reat for. e      of American    « arrier-b.ised plane.s     )estroyers Shell Bases, .eave Unhurt  Bv MURLIN SPKNCER A L LIED HEADQUARTERS IN THE SOUTHWEST PACIFIC. Sunday. Feb. 20.-(AP) -- American destroyers daiiniily shelled once mighty Rabaul and its siippleinenlary base of Kavieng early Friday I for the first time in tlie war, Mov-ini: b(/ldiy to uilhrn four miles of tliose Japanc.^e strongpoints on Northeastern New Britain and Norfhweat-ern New Ireland, they duelled witli shore batteries and sil-(‘need them.  They heavllv damaged shipping. Thev blew u|> shore in.stallations. Then thev departed undamaged At Rabaul. thev smaslied at Snnpson Harbor which Ilf's deep within n;anc}ip bav  Hurp fire.s were ,set In dot k area.s  -\l Knvien*. thp rirstrovrrn even remained until afirr «lav-broak.  Ha))ai:l na*. approarhrfl hr ihr deslrovrrs irndrr rnvrr of R Httinkr screen.  I'iir, opposing ».hoip tinltrrir« wprp knoi'ked out. Flames wrri* spread over tiip docks by llie warships* siiclls.  TIIIO TliMK ARKIVKD—Ilabaul has been the object of much Allied activities in the Pacific hut it got its first shelling vcsterda.v. Here is a closeup of the comiminity stirroiinding this important base.  72^300 NAZIS DIE IN TRAP  LONDON, Sunday. Feb. 20.—(AI‘)—The Russians announced last night that they had not only killed or captured 7:!,200 Germans in the 14-day battle of the Korsiin trap but had seized an immense armory of Na/.i equipment, including 10,()00 trucks, B18 guns and Ufi tanks. The Nazi Eighth army commander’s body also was declared found amonE the dead.  The nnnounrenient saidi    ;    '  that 10,000 more Germans had been counted since figure.s on German losses in the fjreat Dnieper bend debacle had been made public first last Thursday. Among these were :i.()()() dead, making a lolal of ,).i,00(l slain, anii 7,20« addi-  Expect Nippons oSeek Peace  The  at Kavieng. ]€,( of Rabaul. hii a ex|)loded Othei  lionni prisono 18,200 captives.  The annoiincement n .statement broarlca, radio.  for  total  I hi  fl M0.WOW details of  and the result of whicii lias not bee ciis< losed be< au.'-e l adm ■'ilence mu,' he ob.‘^erved bv sliips of the attackin fr.rccs.  There was no indi<a;if.n of tli -i/.e nf the .Iapane.se garrison fir frnriing Engebi and the sunoundin  mds  the  veste  aidci  de;  The Weather  McEachern Taken  ROSWELL. N. M. Feb, 19 — Deputy Sheriff Coke Flore.-, reported that he liad arrested Robert Mc-Eaciiern. escaped Texas convict, fo-day on a bus at Artesia. 43 nule'-south of Rc>swcll.  McEachern offered no rc.sL^tanr*’ although Flore.'s said he carried a .45 caliber automatic in a shoulder holster. Flores met the bus on a tip that McEachern had bought a a ticlcet at Dexter a few miles south of Roswell.  McEachern was reported to have admitted hLs Identity and his escape frcm Huntsville. Texa^. prLson where he was serving a life sentence ior murder.  rrs. ¡ticludiiis .'^ejschmitt 410s, ^ over contmental ba .Mosquitos on intruder pa  Cai  'halls, but it is probable prelinilnai ^ ■'hip bombarrlment and platie bomb-itii! and stiafing killed tnanv of tlif (¡(fenders and kno<'ked out inin'. (ìe:«-iìse pasi(ion,s before the 2‘Jd Ma-rme regiment charged avhore  For the first time Ï ruk is witliin range of .\merlean land-ha.sed planes, ponape, 42.5 mile« soiilhwrst of r.nEebl. is tvilhín easy range even of inr<liiim Mitrhells and Iheir T.-i-miti ran-  SpHbecs prob;ibh follo-Aed tlir h ■«nult troop,-« a-:¡nre and lieuan in meciiafe reha uilitH t ion r.f fiir b.. '^rerl Engebi fieUi affer i's c;iptni There was no nieniion of arn Moops in todays anno A triangular \ha!>ed ::rbi i.s a Jîpro.x ima î el v oi nn each of its tlnee side; foot runwav i.v jtk-ated on the noiHi-••'.est shore and bciti.v east to wc.hI -\s a nrekide lt> ilir ma |or ntt;(<k on Truk and tiie inva'-ion of the ^ Kniwetok atoll Arnr- and Na’. \ •Mane.s and w fir^tup.'' K)iiied m neu- : itializhig fltta<k^ on Popane and Kusaie. both important Ninponese ha.vp In the Carolines and other I ba.M-s in the Marsnalls between Feb ' 14 and     .«-liell.s    fell on    snuill coastal ve,s.«scK      in the    harboi    Tlie docks were an      liulfed    In fh    imes after beiiiK hit.      f’oast it    1 bi.tfei    ries Wf'ie tenderefl im.      pof etif    t o I e.s J    f naca) laid-ts.      The    bfunbai    'dinents ucte disclosed      li.dav    in a cf    unmunique of Oeneial      MarAi    Iliiir    He al-;o renoited that      onlv t    he d;K    pi K)f to the .shelling      of Ral    oaul to    rordo and dive-bomb-      er^ fi(    >m Ihe    .‘^olomons hit 12 .shiiw      and 2(    1 bnmr;    in Ihe hari)or theie      Fi.ur    mrrliun    1 sized caruo ves.'els      and a    tankr    I were believed sunk      Hea\ V    dama;    ■e Wi,' «aused to two      destro'    ^ers a    tanker and a patrol      vcK-sel             sland. Kn-  . The .5 non- :  rn thr lhurviij,y air strike nf Rabaul. l.>0 naiintlrss flhr-hombrrs, A\enRcr Uiipeilo hombrrs. ( cuvsurs and War-l»a»vk\ got iîi Ibeir beavv HiUs despite the oppo-ition of .%n .lapanpvr pluies of %vhl<-b elçbl wem shot down. Ihr raiders lost four planes.  'I'lir bombardments of Ilabaul anil Kavii-ns ociiirrnl .mpriml-malcly al the same time.  WASHINCiTON, Feb. 19— .-n — f The possibdltv that Japan may b« forced t(* ptill out of .some of her sect.ndaiv is'land positions in ths Ontral Pacific. ficht n delaying Di'- action al others and concentrate on I 'U M rengi hening an inner defense rinff 1 H) IS re. *MvinK .-serious consideratioa in milliarv anfl naval quarters here.  • ' .Su< h an enemy strategy could r«Milt from the cumulative effect r>i ihe loKc.s now working against fhr ./iipitnc,'«e. anci ''ome officers be-iii‘ve II i.s ineviiable They do not 'h' V,.,. niiv (,’her wav fur the Japan-to attornphsh their mam pur-'‘•'1 pi.sr of flii(«mng oui the Pacifio ■"I" wiir in the hope Ihe Allies will get iiMd nf Ihe whole business and ’•‘i amnc til a compromise peace.  111.    As part of an enemy stratcg.r developrd alone thi'^ line it is  !(•    also brlirved tiiat from time In  111*    (ime I'ok.xi will launch pearn  or    offenvivrs, trying esprcially to  :uk1 j    (apitaii/r on conditions at (lift  r.:< <    rnd of Itir uar in Ktirope. With  » ’    siirt) A peace the .lapanese  I ! >[    uoiild Kain vrars lo prepare for  uiM ,    another fhnc at eoncjuest.  »h of Amer-  a nd  and  'Hi.  -hip-  Rabaul     To Aid in    At Eniwetok litey reached the closest air and set position afforded by the .Marshalls for an      Scrap Drive  Siinrta^^ rvrVpi . 1 nu.) v i „ I I*, so ALBANY. Fob. 19 ' HW .—Scrap '    offensive against the CarollncH to thr south. .Marianas isian<ls to the east, or Wake to the north, only 700 miles from Eni-' wetok. 1     and daniayed  i\aded Tue> \f> Soloiiion.^ 22.non .Janai  to eut off  Sun*el lonl*bt; ■530.  Ufj,. in .Shackelford Coun'v will h'' •m • jnet i/.ed' to tlie war effort 'v. foi : srlfiiri.v from Camp Wolt»'; ' wlv will becin an inlen.'-l\e .vrr;«,) cam aign Feb 23. accordini- to Ol-lie C ' uke, Albany chamber of coni-mer( < manager  Th-^ goal is l.OOO.OOi) pounds of scrap metal. Clarke said.  In lf>42 I..320.000 pounds of .scrap metal. 80,000 pounds of rubber and 630.00() pounds of ahuninum were gather'fl Since then a local scran buver has been taking the local rffenni:'- In 1943. again, over IfiO tons of metal. 10 tons of scrap rubber were gathered from the area.  Obv  for'  0.<JS of f}):  Eti:  andv  •tok i-let Ic nK abo\  A&M Directors Stand by Eudaly  COLlKCiK .‘^rXlloN f-'*'  M    m!    :..i, jh-  Irlf'cti-.ii''o! K H l-.ud.-','. t'. h<.ul  Ihr extension xcMi'  The (111* < t‘-i - '••■■■    •  p:u(iaiv 1^ íhí' I"- ' 'i . 'fl man for thi^ po.si'i..n uo' ,í:íhu*'<!  T T''* 1 ni -11 "■ ■ ''t-  Ipllcr'in'.in M I. Wu->:.  ,on exicn.Mon due toi h.- ;hKi-(1 ••Mr Wll.M.n'.-. lettri uwr..i*-d ^  oVher'th.in ilii.i of Ml I-. lo,.:-.  .Mr KudaU    !h' 'u,.iü.mous  choice of the duct ->.r.s 1^; ■ iu- po.-t and we .so informrfl :U \M! on t^o nionth.s a;:o \hr ..pini-n -'I the  ln.'ii fi ■ memori h.i ti"! ' h;ini;efi  'he  eri b\ the fact able thi.^ week ell-defined .sun ultaneous-:i the invasion others. Tokyo Maleolap and  the  of thf .....  coral rerf and nrarhv Parrv inland, 'Banana-shaped Eriiwrtok is .sHcht-; Iv more than I’ao miles long and sheltcrfi ojie of the best harbors in ; the Marshalls Tlic.sp major Lsirts : are flat enough for rtir .strips.  .04 Inch Rain Here  Precipitation here yesterday, a cold drizzly day. amounted to ,04 inch, the weather bureau reported Light rain was predicted for Sunday.  Conservation Up  FORT WOR'PH, Feb lil —>r— A U S Dr]iaitmen' of A«riculturp re-I port relea'>ed loflav sa\s con.serva-tion farnnng and ranching increa.s-cr- Texas crop, pasture, and ran^e pKXluction an average of 33 percent The report summarized mforma-tion supplied by 1.400 Texa.s farmers and ranciiers whttse coiuservaiion plan.*^ on 804.773 acres have ber-n 70 to 100 per cent e&tablished for periods oi two to six years.  f  Outbreak Seen  HOUSTON, Feb 19 , r‘ -Troop.v returning frf)ni overseas duty will touch off outbreaks of malaria in parts of the nation free of the dis-ea.^e >ca:.''. Dr A a C Cliand-ler fold the animal cot\\enlion if tiip Texas Club of InternU'ts today.  2. Ihe rlfclinr In .lapan'»! shippini: strenclh. due in great part lo \n»ericai\ submarine SUC4 esM's, This 1^ a direct blow lo Ih*- defense of the outer island positions such as thnse In the l arolines. s tt r roimding Truk. The enemv has to ehoose whether he will attempt lo i<eep all the bases inadequately supplied and partially restored after earii .American air and sea raid or whether he will concentrate on defending a few well.  3 The qualitative Inferiority of n\U( h .Iapane.se war equipment. Japane.se plane lo.s.sos average several times tho.se of the American :ur forces and urmen say this is because their p'iare.<. and pilots as well simplv are not good enough to put up a fight on equal terms. The enemy s tenacitv and courage in battle and his frequently good na-\al gunnerv have failed to compensate for other tactical weaknesses.  Convention CaNed  CANADIAN. Feb. 19 —f-ip)— The Fifth am\ufll convention of the National Rodeo association will be held at Fort Worth March-12-13. Association Secreiar> C. A. Studer sáid ' today.   

From 1607 To The Present

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