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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: February 17, 1944 - Page 1

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Publication: Abilene Reporter News

Location: Abilene, Texas

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 17, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                WAR BOND SCORE Owr-oll Quofo Solcf Series E Quota E Solei VOL. LXHI, NO. 245 Cfje Mene Si WJJHOUI on WITH OFFENSI'.; TO nn Krwe A TEXAS NEWSPAPER OR FOES (VE SCU YOUR WORLD EXACTLY A.c _ABILENE, MORNING, FEBHUARY 17, _TWELVE PAGES ome Railway Yards Hit Again _____ i IHL HIM i i i _- ,_'__ _ _ _ RED CROSS OPENS WAR FUND DRIVE FOR Preparations for. Taylor county's Cioss We staried yesterday afternoon a iiineeting of the executive'cdmmlt teemen nnd directors appointed b; .The .campaign will open March 5 Wurder Charge Eacing Farmer MUNDAY, Feb. Bill Swain. Munday farmer, was held in the Knox county jiil at Benjamin I (might under a murder charge by Slieriif L. C. Floyd short- iPsfter the .fatal street-stabbing here about one o'clock of Jake For fst, also of Munday. Swain voluntarily surrendered to Sheriff Floyd.' Charley Blount of Paducah, 39Ui district iittorney.'will preliminary hearing In Munday Thursday, at which time bond is expected to be set pending action of the grand jury. A regular court tenn at Munday has just come to an end and Sheriff Hoyd last night a special grand jury probably would be called by Judge Lewis Williams. Sheriff Floyd said Swain had made no explanation for the slay- ing other than to say of Forest "I j.Jted him." Sn-ain is reported to have (old Munday citizens the pair met on the main street of the town, In front of a theater building, ex- changed a few words, then Forest Danced on Swain with a knife. Ewain drew his knife and stabbed Forest in the heart. Forest died a few minutes later in a doctor's of- fice. In conflict with Swain's claim Forest nude the first move with a was n report the slain man's knife was found in (rouser pock- el, unopened. Immediately alter the stabbing Swain walked across the street in- to the office of Jim Brasher, man- BKr of Roach Machinery Co. He Brasher what had happened, saying nc "thought" he had killed Forest. Brasher r.ccorr.panied Swain to the office of Mayor C. R. Elliott, where he waited arrival of the sheriff. about 35 years was knowii in Munday as sn odd-Jobs worker. His wife, parents. Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Forest, and a younger brother. Earl, in service overseas, arc amon? survivors. was a prcmmenl Knox' county farmer who lived northeast of Munday. near Goree. He Is abouY I 000 national is when the 'Taylor .count) civilians gave and ofiicers men of the1 Army in the county gave JJI.OOO.1 Although the local quota this year .as throughout the. nation, is much higher, it lacks ol equalling the amount expended in'the county last year by American Red Cross. The past year's operations here cost more than The budget of- Taylor county chapter for the year beginning March approved by-na- tional headquarters, calls for ex- penditure of in this county, said Wilmer Sims, chapter chair- Ed S. Stewart, general .chairman of the War Fund campaign for the second straight year; Tom K. Eplen, member of ihe executive committee, and Rcxscoe Blankenshlp, vice chair- man, spoke to the directors assemb- led yesterday afternoon. The campaign is planned on a classification and professional group plan. Each director is assigned cer- tain business or professional group. Each director is to appoint a chair- man for each classilicalion and also workers to solicit prospects in each classification. In addition to the professional and business classifications. is the quota for communities out- side Abilene. the o.uota for the city residential solicitation members of clubs affiliated with the City Federation of Women's clubs, the major gifts quota and for general soltclation of business people. The primary object of this plan, said. Eplcn and Blankcnship. is to spread the work of solocltation among as many individuals as pos- sible, and also to sec that a maxi- mum number of individuals are solicited for gifts. It was pointed out that tills will be the highest sum ever sought in i funds-raising campaign in this :ily and county, where the money fiven sill represent straight dona- ions. This is unlike a War bond drive, it was noted, because War rands are investments, and gifts to he Red Cross.war fund are just for humanitarian pur- poses. Talk of Peace No STOCKHOLM. Feb. waves of Russian planes bombei Helsinki tonight and caused fire and damage to the Finnish capita from which rumors of maneuver for a separate peace have been emanating since it was last attack ed on Feb. 6. Reports lo Ihe Swedish press said that 50 Russian planes In the first formation kept the city under alerl from 5 lo 10 p. m. the second attack, which ap- peared heavier, began at 11 p. m. and ended shortly before Dispatches ssM (hat heavy anli-nircraft fire forced of the bombers fo drop loads outside the city. The attack was described medium by the Helsinki correspond- ent of the Swedish newspaper Dag- ens Nyhcter in a brief phone call to Stockholm. Widespread damage-and a mim- Jer of ca.-ualties were caused In the Russian bombing of Feb. 6, which was carried out by bright moon- light. Tlie Moscow radio warned that his blaslins was only the prelude to heavier Finnish Foreign Minister Sir Hen- rife Ramsay reported on (he "for- eign political situation" to the for- eign affairs committee of parlia- ment today, a Swedish news agency disoatch from Helsinki said. No details were given on Ram- ay's meeting with the committee. The Finnish press meanwhile de- manded more news on tile peace ituation to forestall rumors co.-n- np from foreign capitals. Air raid sirens In Hel- Inki early today, with anti-air- craft guns firine on the outskirts but with no bombs falling.. Premier Edwin Linkomies. who has been 111 at his country home since Jan. 20. returned to his capi- tal office today. f.l Mnsco-.v dispatch said there fas nn official comment nn peace rumors, but lhal ihe Tiiii- slan people, remembering the of Leningrad ami other Finnish participation In Hie war. would inrIM on hard Irrmv and have almost the same for the, Finns as for the Germans.) Generals Gather For Dallas Talks years old. Both men had lived in 'Knox county for a numbrr of years and hjccnlong-time acquaintances. Uorgest Membership 4 AUSTIN. Feb. Texas of Parents and Teachers the largest membership In its le present iv.tmbershlp of 154 'ru It also was pointed out that there Is a. very real difference between he Red Cross War Fund campaign i nd a Red Cross membership roll i all. In the latter, one dollar is I DALLAS- 16-J.7-. paid for a Hcd Cross membership i of an In the former money Is gircn to rrived lociav Thc van- of Army r the con- PLANES 60 DWS TO COME BACK SAFELY (Editors' Nole: Outlines of the epic slory of the 60-day wan- dcring through N'azl-conlrolted territory b.v U American Armr nurses and n men were rt- vcaled in a dlspaicli from Cairo. Allied headquarters now has released (he follonin, slory by Hal Boyle jiving addi- tional details of tht odessty.) B.v Hal BOVLE A U. S. AIR BASE IN ITALY Jan. party of flying nurses, officers and men, "who dodged Gorrr.fji fighter planes, ar- tillery shells and road patrols for two terror-filled months after their transport plane became lost in a storm and crashed-landed early In November (n mountunous' Albania brought back to safety today. A British naval launch In a peril- ous midnight foray along the rocky enemy-held coast evacuated the group without giving a calm ending to one of the most uoual adventures of the war. Besides tiie nurses, the group In- cluded members of the transport crew and a number of T-3 flying hospital orderlies, who' assist the nurses in air evacuation of the wounded. Despite a half-dozen brushes with dealli durlni ibt dm; they were afoot In the Balkan mount- ains, the morale of all of the troup was hljli when they were finally rescued. During their Jong and dangerous game of hide-and-seek with the enemy, they narrowlv escaped be- ing shot down by Nazi fighter planes, they burned (heir own trans- port later to keep it from falling into German hands, they crossed a mountain in a winter blizzard, they watched from the hills as American bombers blasted a German air they were forced to flee themselves when Die Nazis bombed and shelled a village In which Uiry to.uid icfuse nnd once they found themselves in the middle of a fight between fend- ing native factions. Then at last they made a 56-lionr forced march to reach a scacoast rendezvous. "ft nil sounds exciting no-.v. but looking baci on It I think pcrhnps the ccolies and fleas we nil picked up caused us tlic inoit hardship.' laughed Lt. Agnes A. Jensen of Stanwood, Midi., senior nurse of tile air evacuation squadron. The most heartbreaking ino- menl In the journey came rcsculm planes, which circled overhead waiting to pick Ilicju up, were forced to leave because approaching German tanks and luns in the vicinity were In a position lo SH'cp (lie airflctil See NURSES, fg. J. Col. S New Japanese Base EXPEa.TAYLOR TO PASS SERIES E QUOTA TODAY Taylor county U due to pass Its Fourth War Loan quota !or Serie E bonds today. At close of business Tuesday sales j this, county had reached at least or short of tlie Series E quota of The total of sales ot all' types of a- tion of yesterday's -sales was ex- pected to bring the total above the quota; All counties of this region had exceeded their. Fourth War Loan quotas at the end of the official period set aside for tin's drive Feb. 15. All purchases of Series E, .F- and G bonds reported to the Federal Reserve bank In Dallas by mid- night Feb. 29 will be credited on the quotas of the respective coun- ties. It' was believed here last nielli that Taylor county might end that period with credit for total and nearly in Scries E bonds: Midland. Martin, Jones and Cole- man county reached, and passed their quotas Tuesday and Tuesday night, the first two named having so reported ycjtcrday rriorplng .to LpclftfH Bhelton, Abilene, regional manager'for the'state wa finance committee: Although Ihe quota of south- ern Jones county, including An- sm, was S'ZS.JSO, sales through Usl Saturday wert S2T0.186. Ihe campaign was be- ing continued. J. J. Sttele, An- Jon bank president, is (he chair- man for southern Jones county and he said he expected iofal sales of the area to reach 000 before tabulation of sales eredilcd in this drive, are closed. Sleele expressed his appreeia- Set WAR BONDS, Pg, 5, Col. 1 Berlin Receives Heaviest Blasts LONDON. Feb. RAF seared the .remains of Berlin last night with well over 2.800 tons of explosive and fire henv- cst aerial bombardment ot n sin- gle target ever delivered. Tliis unprecedented bomb load was dumped on the capital.by jrobably close to bombers In 0 minutes from and p. m. sending through It R hurricane 3f flame and explosions rom which smoke' Quickly rose four miles high. in (he raid on Berlin, a feint at- ack on Frankfvtrt-on-Oder, 50 nilcs to the cast, Mosquito raids m Western Germany and Holland nd mine-laying operations, the used more than bombers, ncluding 1.000 and lost 3. The RAF armada sent out lasl ight probably was the largest ever o operate over the Reich in sin- Je night. Sfntkholm advices said that Kreat fires were rinrinjr Berlin today in the wake of Itic RAF's lotli heavy allacV in Hie "elim- ination" scries which befan lasi Nov. (18. II was apparent vast new damage was done in Ihe already hard bit capital, mosllj in the Industrial outer belt including the Wiltenau. LicMcnbcrg and MarlcnMdc districts. Swedish correspondents were un- 3le to send early reports on the aid to their papers. Travelers reaching Malmoe. Swc- cn from Berlin, said the attack- rs struck particularly lurd at the EXPENSIVE FEED GAINESVILLE. Feb. 16 -w, _ Feed may be scarce, but Boh Bond Gainesville dair.iman. Isn't goinp; to stand for his cattle eating his money. Bond missed several greenbacks from hb purse shortly after he dropped it while feeding calves Then Bond placed R blank check- on, the ground to find the guilty animal. A two-montlis-old Guern- sey snatched the check. Bond slaughtered the animal re- covered two ten-dollar bills three fives and four-one-dollars. And all but two were In good enough condition to be mcd as le- gal tender" rejoiced Bond. Nazi Backer Dies MADRID, Feb. IS-Wi-Gcrman newspapers today announced the death of Karl Kenkell, 55. a cham- paene maker who was one of the first Germans lo finance the Nazn party movement, from injuries suf- fered during a recent Allied bomb- ing of Wiesbaden. Poles in Itafy ALLIED HEADQUARTERS. Al Siers. Feb. 16 corps commanded by Lt. Gen. Whdyslaw Anders now ts in action ml n front, it was disclosed tonight Ponape, Near Truk, Visited By Bombers BY LKO.VARD Associated Trtss Editor Big.American Army Liberators bombed shore defenses on Ponape, major eastern outpost of the Caro- line Islihdv In, deepest strliti ever made by. land planes on Ja- pan's central Pacific islands Ad- miral Chestcr.W. Nimju announced Shells Stil Pour Into Monastery ,VM the Rome railway Ihcr (lie destruction by sabotaging Nazi traffic Gen. Sir Harold Alexander, commander-in- chief of Al- cd forces m Italy, said American and British troops .C.SC billllc of beachhead wHhoul assistance from Ihe Cassinn front. Even while the Invaders struck again at the freight cars P4n wT facilities in Rome, P-40 Wai-hawks bombed the ruins of the Benedictine monas- tery of Ml. Cassino. Artillery was reported still pouring shelJs mto what was left of the monastery by yesterday's at- In its appeal, the Bari radio called for sabotage on the roads from Rome lo the Anzio beachhead and the Garigliano front on the west coast and urged the Italian patriots to blow tip bridges, change danger signals, causing landslides, sprinkle the road with glass, ijails and sharp stones and try to fire gasoline and ammunition dumps. "German traffic must be stopped on these roads and the railways whicli run along the Tyrrhenian and Adriatic coasts at any it declar- ed. In the meet cheering forecast !o come from the bloody beachhead since It was established Jan. 32, Alexander his troops there two days ago that "tliere b absolutely no Dunkerque here there's no oasis for pessimistic, rubbish" end said that with idcnl conditions Rome nilsht have been captured quickly hv Mia r____ yesterday. Ponape is only 410 land miles cast of Tmk, central fortress of the Car- olines. The raid Monday was the Mrsl attack of Hie war on I'on- apc and apparently the first big flight from Kwajakin aloll Principal air base of the Mar- shal! Islands, wmlcd from the Japanese c.vactly two weeks previously. No plane.-, were lost in lhal raid t eight Solomons-based aircraft were shot down In flaming raid tin Kavicng, New Ireland. Fifteen of the U. S. airmen shot down were picked up a darinjf Catallna flying boat which landed in enemy waters and rescued them under fire of Kavleng's shore guns. The losses were the heaviest AI- icd forc.cs have ever suffered at Kavicng. But Ihe town was left a mass of flames nnd a medium siz- Srt PACIFIC, Ff. 5, Col. Z Berlin Claps Reds Repulsed On Lake Shore LONDON. Thursday, Feb. 17 forces, driving down from .he north, have readied the narrow neck ol water between Lakes Pelpus nnd Oskov. 45 miles northwest of Pskov, and German reports said to- day the Russians had already sent sledges over the ice in an crossing Into Southern .Sfoscow -'reported Jf 500 more Germans were killed nnd 107 of (heir, tanks wrecked In a treralcd German attempt to break :he relentlessly contracting Soviet ring around the remnants of len Nazi divisions trapped In the Uk- raine. The Berlin radio Km- sian forces had sped across the ice on take Peipus on sledges and reached the shore, but ircrc thrown back by Ger- man defenders. The reported llie cap- lire of Chcdskoye-Zskhodi In this nrca and large FCfilc maps show a Znkhodi on the bight, of land that s but two-and-a-half miles from he other shore. A little further south the neck Is but a mile-nnd- a-halt wirle. A successful Russian crossing in this area might completely disrupt German plaas for the defense of Estonia for they have apparently built R solid defense line In the Innd bridge to the north between Ihe Baltic sea and Lake Peipus. No recent Russian advances had been reported officially in the Narva area Sec RERUN, Fg. 5, Col. 3 Sgt. Jack Johnson Of Snyder Killed SNYDER. Jan. 16 Mrs. B. B. Johnson of Pyron has been Inform- ed by the War department that her son. Sgt. Jnck Johnson had been killed In action at Araw.i. New Bri- tain. The report gave the date of the death as Feb. 1. Sergeant Johnson, a 1331 graduate of high school attended Tex- as Tech three years and had been ir. the Army lour years, attached to the 112th Cavalry at the time he was killed. He had scried In New Caledonia. Australia and Wood Lark irfaixi. by Ihe landing forces. "I you the Gennaru op- posite us here are a very unhap- py he said, hU with determination. The Germani realte lost the batlle, though events Jure nut gone aj swiftly as we ourselves hoped. Had everything been perfect we might have gone straight through to Rome in the. first round. "As it Is, we are near the end of the second round nnd we are winn- ing It. The third round will coma "P a strong Coincident with this encouraging news from the beachhead, word came that American doughboys were "aggressively .patrolling" Ih, area around the Benedictine monas- IrVU A'' Cnwlno- oMiter- wns reported still poiir- Into (lie smoking ruins .oday, but it was possible that Yank nfantry was cltabmg toward the rubble and would effect its cap- ture sooti. An Alfed spokesman said .nat -breaches" had been mnde In .he Nazi defenses there. Aerial pholograpbs showed 'Hal the monastery buildings were destroyed except for a small part of the white, lO-foot-lhfcfc wall on the west side. There was I'lllc chance that German ar- tillery observers or machine- gunners still were operating from the ruins. Fljing Kortress- es alone scored 36 direct hilj on the abbey with 500-pound bombs and another 50 hits with incendiaries, not taking into ac- count additional damage done, b.v 150 medium bombers later In day. Rt. Rev. Alfred Koch, arch- ibbot of St. Vincent monastery Latrobe, Pa., said he understood' hat all monks of the Mt. Cnsslno bbey left for places ot safely south f Rome several weeks ago. There Sec IT-.U.V, Fg. S. Col. 2 The Weather carry on Red Cross activities i of commands. Army northern and northwestern section throughout the world, as well as ii1 opening here tomor- nf Ihr. city and in the Schocncberg ui IQ.WU over last state PTA headquarters an- throughout the world, as well as in this country'. Also, it was stressed that all in- and young, rich and asked to give to the War Fund. This means that school children will be soliclited, as well as adults, to give what they can This solicitation has nothing to do. and is not conflicting with ac- tivities of the Junior Red Cross task of the War Fund and not the raise See RED CROSS, 5, Col. 1 row. Robert P. Patterson, tlic Under- secretary of War, Lt. Gen, Brchon Somervell, commandim the Army service forces and Lt. Gen. George Grnnert. commanding the eafteiii defense command, head tr.e list of more than 40 general officers at- tending the conference Early arrivals Included Major Generals Thomas A. Tern-. Com- manding the second service co-n- York: Philim Hayes, tnird service command. Baltimore and David McCoacli. ninth service Douglas, Utah, city nnd in the Schocncberg district not a house war, left stand- ing. One traveler said Ho'.cl Bristol on Unler den Linden was demol- ished by blockbusters and 2.000 dead were taken from the ruins this report which con- flicted with accounts of earlier raids in which the Bristol hotel was said to have been heavily hit. Asserting "British Air mms' had carried out "another terror DNB. German news agency, admit- ted damage was caused and alibied thai the weather favored the raid- ers. ..V. ..51 JT'S is Ihe ancient Benedictine monastery aton Mount Cassino   

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