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Abilene Reporter News Newspaper Archive: February 13, 1944 - Page 1

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   Abilene Reporter-News, The (Newspaper) - February 13, 1944, Abilene, Texas                                WAR BOND SCORI Over ell Scriei E Quota E Salct Sergei t to Go Over the Top 180.469.2S Reporter WITHOUT OR WITH OKl-'JiNSii TO 1'RIEiS'DS OK FOJiS Vi'K KXACTLY AS IT SUNDAY VOL. LXIII, NO. 241 A TJXAS 2-U, NEWSPAPER ABILENE, TEX AS, SUNDAY MORNING, FEBRUARY 13, 1944 PAGES IN THREE rrm IAP> united rrtu (U.P.I PRICE FIVE CENTS Help Is Here, Clark Tells 5th Guards to Iruk Peppered W ith Bombs 'NEW BRITAIN NIPPONESE Three Area Counties Top Bond Quotas STARVING TO DEATH, ALSO By LEONARD MILL1MAN Associated Press War-Editor I At least 43 Japanese planes were wiped out in devastat- ing new .aerial sweeps against Rabaul and Kavieng, stand- ing between American South Pacific forces and the fortress of Truk, Gen. Douglas MacArthur reported today. Thirty two definitely were shot down and nine probably in aerial dogfights over Ra- baul's Vunakanau and Tobera airdromes, even as Allied bombers from the Solomons blasted their runways and d gun positions with 174 tons ot bombs. American fighters lost only four planes as they cut in half the fleet of 60 inter- ceptors thst tried to halt .4 them. Divebombers and lorpedo planes started the fireworks shortly alter dawn, with a blast at Vunakanau bomber base. Mediums followed noon while fosir rngined bombers 'ii> struck at the Tobera lighter strip, which this month Is the most bomb- ed spot in the Southern Pacific. Ten Japanese planes were wreck- ed on Ihe ground as the air offen- sive returned to Kavicng on New Ireland. No enemy interceptors tried to halt the attack. Starvalion and ntw enemies thai have been stalk- ing the Japanese.in the _ irnon islands and New been 'lakinr .their loll on lw.'Marine.pjirua. Borfen the site end of the from Ra- haul, Jnund many Japanese dead without a mirk on their bodies. Far westward American sky dra- gons sank three Japanese freighters In Ihe Soulh China sea while other units ol the 14th U. S. Air Force deslroyed two trains, including one loaded with troops, hit bridges and straled rivcrcraft in "sweeps over China. In Soulhern Burma numerous casualties have been inflicted on Japanese forces persislently attack- in" British positions on the Arakay front for nine days. Admiral Lord Louis Mountbalten reported. The British are holding against simul- taneous attacks from many direc- tions and al the same time shov- ing ahead their spearhead in the Kaladan area. The unofficial American army and Navy Journal suggested that Soviet Russia may "deem II cx- pedienf an act of friendship to warn the Tokyo government Ks interests demand that it seek "peace" In Hie Pacific. Another Soviet Rail Junction Nears Capture LONDON. Feb. -Soviet troops are now fighting In the sub- urbs of Luga, a junction on the Leningrad-Pskov-Warsaw r ailway 80 miles south of Lcrihiffrad-Balet- skaya-Novgorod railway the capture of Batetskaya, Moscow an- nounced tonight, Far to the south In (he Ukraine troops ol the first and second Uk- rainian fronts captured seven more towns from the tired and hungry remnants of 'ten Nazi 100.000 Imminent sur- render or death. German efforts to smash the Russian ring from the outside again were thwarted, said the broadcast Moscow communique recorded by .the Soviet monitor. Thirty-three transports tryitig to carry supplies to the be-' sieged werp shot down Friday. The Germans now were crowded nto an 11-mile-long strip of ter- ritory from Korsun north along a railroad. Golyaki was captured at he northern extremity of this last tfazi toehold .and Kavashtn, less than three miles southeast of Kor- sun was taken on the southern end, the communique said. The northern action, in which more than 40 communities were captured, was moving through heavy snow in a., clean-up of the Germans protecting the retreat Irom the north between lakes II- men and Peipus. In the.Ukraine there were signs that the Russian noose was closing around the iron town of Krivoi nog where railway escape routes running northwest and southwest have been cut. Three more West Centra Texas counties Runnels Shackelford and Scurry were listed Saturday as "over the top" in the Fourth Wai Loan drive. Big street rallies yesterday at Bal linger and Winters sent Runnel! over-all bond figure soaring to 630.33 against a quota of 5923.000. County Chairman VI. 1. (Tub- by) Hembree u' Ballinger told Holland Drained Deeply by Nazis WASHINGTON, Feb. story of the thorough-going Nazi drive to bleed Holland svliile in order to bolster Ihe German war machine s told today by tlie Netherlands Information service. Since the fall of the Netherlands In 1940. It said In a survey, material and human wealth of the country has drained consistently, leaving a tremendous Job for relief and reconstruction authorities. Tlie extent of Nazi looting and killing was described in the following point by point summary: Total executions from May, 1S40. through December, 1943, were es- timated al 20.000 and it has been reported that persons In Hol- land liave gone into hiding from the Nazis. The food situation has 'deterloraled to the point where the official ralion contains slighlly over half the pe-r-day of the normal pre- Rome March, Victory Sure, Troops fold FIFTH A R M V 1IKAD- QUARTERS IN ITALY, Feb. Gen. Mark Clark, in a message his Fifth Army troops nil aloiij; the Western Kalian front war diet. WASHINGTON, Feb. 12 Sales in the Fourth War Loan drive totaled MO through .yesterday, or 93 per cent of the Ihe Treasury announced today. The Reporter-News that .165 In bonds were sold Ballinjer rjllly. It wns a spirited gathering at which Major Dale Evans of Camp Baiielc.Vs MHTC and Capt. Edward Feille of Conrho field, a-flier who had seen much action in the South Pacific, made stirring talks. Music was furnished by the Con- See BOND DRIVE, Pf. 1, Cat. I There has been a ol disease and Ihe dealh rale has gone Irom 8.6 tn 1939 lo 9.4 in 1942. The clothes rationing system is insufficient to provide for most ele- .cntary needs, and worth of textiles were requisitioned by the ermans In 1943. s. The housing deficit Is estimated at from 150.000 lo dwellings nd large parts of several towns have been demolished. According to an official Nazi publication. 416.000 Dutchmen have cen taken from Holland to do forced labor; of Holland's ews have been deported to Poland or Germany. It, Paul Clark V in Second LI. Paul Clark. 22-year- old Abilene navigator, was report- ed missing ii: action over Germany since Jan. 30 In a War department message to the young flier's wife who lives at '110 Meander. fc Harry Hopkins' Son Casualty WASHINGTON. Feb. 12 President Roosevelt tonishl noliftcd Harry L. Hopkins that Ills son, Ste- phen. 18. had been Wiled in action in. the Marshall islands and buried at sea. Hopkins Is an ndiiser and friend of the chief executive. Mrs. Hopkins, confirming reporls of the death, said no details were available. Stephen was a child o.' Hopkins' first marriage. Hopkins was en route south by train to try to recover his own strength and health, which have been taxed by long and recurrent Illnesses. The president. Mrs. Hopkins said, sent her husband a -beautifully- worded" telcsram telling him of Stephen's death. She said Ihe chief executive averted that "We do not know the details, but we will be prouder of him when we do." I Negro Babies Burned to Death Two negro babies were burned to death when a cabin home a mile and a half cast of Abilene on the Albany hiRhway was destroyed by fire late Saturday afternoon. The dead: Arthur LEE Fletcher, 2. ,fo Ann Fletcher. 19 days old. The babies were the children of Arthur and Ruth Fletcher. The father was some distance from the house killing and the mother was gathering epps when she saw the cabin enveloped in flames in the high wind. She told officers that she tried to chop her way into the house wilh an axe but could not break in. The Abilene fire department an- swered the call but the small house was completely destroyed upon ar rival. Justice of Peace Bill Ward re- turned a vrrriict of accidental death after the investigation. irom the Aiuio tu Cassino, tnld them today (hat llieir victorious march into itome is "sure lo conn1." He assured them that supplies weie arriving on the beachhead which would Blve them the oppor- tunity lo kill Germans "in large HwuUers." The Fifth Army coiumander urg- ed his troops to break through the Germans' "thinned out lines" and to crush the enemy "on your way north." Referring lo the enemy he said: "We welcome his assaults, x x x Give him no rest, and shoot every- one who shows his head." Nazi Fortifications Gen. Clark issued soon after returning his message from a visit to (loops iu the beachhead loday. He complimented the troops and stnick a confident note as the Fifth Army sinnrl in two ol Its toughest battles. These Involve a daring ef- fort lo hold and enlarge the beach- head south of Rome and the wear- bloody struggle to wipe out the Germans in Cassiuo and open Highway 6 lo Ihe Eternal City. "The next step in successful op- erations which we have Just com menced is (or our two forces to joh hands for a victorious march lull Rome and to the Gen Clark said; .'Ameri'i.cUifs -an Liberators maintained the un- precedented pace of daylight borhb- ng with thumping nttack today against the Germans' battered for- lficatlon.9 around Pns-De-Caiais. held French territory nearest o Britain. The four-cngined bombers cross- ed the channel under a roaring uni- irella of Mustang and Thunderbolt 'ighters and :etyrned without loss to-complete successfully their 13th operation In 16 days. Tlie filers re- ported they did not see a single enemy lighter in Ihe sky. Two small formations ot RAP Mosquitos also pounded military targets in Northern France ur.der cover of Typhoons and these too returned without meeting serious opposition. One HAF plane aas losl while the Tphoons bagged three German craft. LT. rAUl, Lieutenant Clark is Hie son o i Mr. nnd Mrs. D. C. Clark. His lalher said last night tha young Clark made his first ra over enemy territory on Dec. 22 of last year nnd had. to his knowledge, been in on six sorties over Europe. Lieutenant Clark was a sopho- more at Texas Tech when the tiona] Guard was mobilized nnd he answered the call. After training with the 3Glh division at Camp Bowie, he was transferred to the air corps and was commissioned as a navigator at the Hondo AAF. Three brothers also are in the service. An elder brother, D. C. Jr. is an ensign in Ihe iN'nvy. Gean is a technical sergeant with the 36lh division In Italy. Billy Tom Is private stationed at Ft. Leonard Mo. Government Won't Appeal Judgments WASHINGTON. Feb. 15 Representative (D-Tex> an- nounced today (lie Justice Depart- ment had decided not to appeal fed- eral court calling lor payment of approximately S1.200.- 000 for 120.000 acres in Brown and Mills comities. Tex., acquired lor maneuver of troops at Camp Bowie. After a thorough review of the cases tried before Federal District Jurtge William H. Atwell at San Angelo. said Fisher, Justice officials decided against resort to appellate courli, Nineteen Fliers Killed in Crash GriKENVlLLE. S. C.. Feb. 12- men were killed today when three planes of a bomb group collided and crashed at the Green- ville Army Air Base. The plants were flying iu forma- tion and touched wings in the air, Mibscquenlly crashing on the north- ern area of the base it-self. Ihc base faid. Flames were observed before Ihr planes hit about three-quarters of a -niie from the ground forma- tion. Tlie planes and the men were tak- ing part in the usual Saturday morirlmt review. The dead included Sgt. James W. Lott. 21. engineer-gunner, of Trin- ity. Texas. "There was not Ino mucb llak" sail] HUH 3rd Hullaiby of Somerset, Ky., a co-pilot on lite Liberator sweep. "The Nazis must h.ivc used up tlicir week- ly ration in the past (wo days. "H'e really laid a gnnd pattern of he added. "We didn't see an rncmy fighter, but our P51s (.Mustangs) were every- where like a swarm of bees." The Liberator "Evelyn tlie Duch- with tlie be.st record in this icater for mLssions completed with- Jt mechanical failure or any dif- cully, chalked up her 49th perfect ay. Demolition of the Germans' At- anllc. wail now has been in pro rc.ss 54 with 40 alt.ick. ircclcd at tlie Pa.s-de-CalaLs area lany in great strength. RAF Mosquito bombert, cor.limi ng their tireless series of raids, hi in Central and Wrftern Gcr ijiny last night, and the Paris radi aid several localities around Rouct vere bcmbcd by the Brllifh Americans yesterday. The Gcininn broadcast communi iue said thai in addition lo Friday trong American daylight raid o Frankfurt. and olhe THE WEATHER r. s. or invi ni nr.vr vitism ith rain AF rfrurtt rnnnn. Unlcht and j-, rpl ndy xnil oth: MondJT t.VST -TFAAS: ulcnil In' pirlly' rlondr In notlh. It >lndv ncraiionall;  Kd Tl MPJ.R Rl Til. Itni R Kills Daughter WASHINGTON, Feb. A mother, Mrs. Christiana Orencifi, admitted today, po- lice said, that the killed her three- year-old daughcr wiili a chair round because the child was crying. Ililh inrf low d f. m If ml :i. llirh ind tin ut 41 ind nicSl it n 3H 31 XI -13 mprnlartt IP Ailt lilt jnr: The vrhote-Afttetkan bombing of fhe'Fdropeah Feri' TCM Jus been uhderjolnr sub- tle change since 3Ifcj, James H. DooHltle. scurried command of U last.month. The stfidily in force of bombers and lighters Ls set- ting a pace calculated to ex- hausl the Germans' de- There has been no announcement f such a change, but from what ic u. S. Army Air Forces have per- illed to be published during the ast lew weeks of operations it Is lain to see that: 1. American heavy bombers are ttacking targets tn smaller forma- ions but oltener and with propor- ionately larger fighter escorts. 2. Such an intensive program orce-s the German day fighters lo lonblc their defensive flight.? and irotcct a much wider area unless hey are willing to let the :ans bomb at will. 3. The More the Nazis come up. he .more of them can be knocked down by the American fighters, who on their latest missions have been strong enough not only Lo guard .he bombers but lo mix it up with :he enemy Independently. This last s admittedly one of the main ob- jectives of both the American forces and the RAF. GeneranerreH iil Army MaJ. Geri, Henry Terrell Jr.. wh commanded the 90th Infantry dlvi sion' from- its activation at Cam Barkeiey..until recently, has bee made of the 22d Arm Beachhead Held Best in 3 Days ALLIED HEADQUARTERS, Algiers, Feb. Fifth Army troops rimly tightened their grip on the Aniio eachhead tonight as their commander, Lt. Gen. Mark W. Clark, assured them that sup- lies were arriving for them and that their vic- arious march on Rome was "sure to come." Their hold on the shell-pitted battle- round was firmer than at any time in the past 2 hours after a German attack was repulsed with the aid of warships which ranged boldly nshore and shelled the Nazi positions. Lauding of. sullies for the beachhead was. carried nut ucccssfully despite heavy shells, and a slight break in the vcaihcr gave promise that overwhelming Allied air sttper- orily might snun return to the aid of Hie hard-lighting ground forces. In a message to all his troops along Ihe Western Italian rout, Including those who slugged out limited gains in the sector, General Clark urged his men lo break through lip Germans' "thinned out lines" and to crush the enemy on heir way north. Supplies were arriving at the beachhead, jcneral Clark said, which would give the Allied forces there he opportunity to kill Germans "in large numbers." (A British broadcast, re- corded by CBS, quoted a Brit- sh war correspondent as say- ing that (he German radio was boasting that' the beach- head force soon'' would have to lake to boats. Such Gej- man statements never hays been "wit.hin miles ths' the co-respondent sjid, adding-that'fh'e .troops were facing their job with sober Dixon Discovers Area Much Too Jbhn H. Reynolds To Captain's Rank WASHINGTON. Feb. The War department announced today temporary promotions of Tex- as officers which included men from Abilene, Brady and San Angclo. Promoted from first lieutenant to captain was John H. Reynolds, on, 1318 South llth. Abilene. Arlhur Earl Kigncy, AC of Brady was ele- vated from captain to major and Robert Dale Rinn. Cav. of San An- gelo was raised from second lieu- tenant to first licule: ant. BV KKSNF.TH D1XON AT THE ANZIO BEACHHEAD, Feb. 7 Tills blasted beachhead. Is entirely too boisterous about bidding man "hello" nnd "good-bye." The first time 1 came up here I got knocked down by a bomb be- fore I gol otf the boat. I didn't want to seem critical, but It struck me then as a very poor greeting. 1 stayed week, ihen went to Naples lo take a bath, change clothes and pick up mail. The day 1 left ttie beachhead nad its big- gest nlr raid In several days. sot bounced around again, but due to my previous experience and Improv- ed footwork, 1 didn't gel, knocked down 1 lay down. I thought I would slip In very (juicily when I came back today, bill that's not the beachhead's way of doing business. my first r'.jsc call it's still a civilian but when il over the first people I saw was a couple of mcdical-Mri men who were planning to pick up the pieces. They were very disgusted lo find 1 was only a reporter. "Why In the hell did Jon come back here II you didn't have to." cx- cialmcd one. I couldn't answer that one. since It was apparent that Ihe Ger- dlsorganted by--determined Alllrd resistance and with their armor bogged down In muddy ler- rain, had been forced to pause regroup. Tlie beachhead was llght- y held, nnd an Allied spokesman declared Its front lines "have re- mained relatively Unchanged dur- ing the pasl few days." Alon? the main Fifth Ann? front to Ihe south the battle also lipped slightly In the Allies' favor ns the Americans scored bloody if limited gains in the key Casslnp sector. Rut tlieie still was notMiii; fa Indicate that the flelilinf In llal.v n'nulri not he aniDii? the cnsllirst and most sanguinary of the war. The Germans were ttyflnf out lo flit Idler Hit- ler's nrdcrs In make a dcsper- tc stand, whatever Ihe cost. In some Installers they more than matching Allied" manpower. The- -Americans' crindhif! strug- gles In C.i.vino finally gave lliem' of one entire section of the shattered town. They also knocked out the rcinniuils of the town jail lo which the Nazis had clung even after Allied high ex- plosives had battered the stronj, T tva.s thinking r-xnctly tlie same thing myself. However. I frit snmewhat reliev- ed because I (isuirr-d the bcach- I head's welcoming feMivHies were cording to word received br-rf. iioiv over. Cheerfully. I said so loncl A news account from Kentucky. to u. cail Dolk olXvarron. O.. and received here, told of General Trr- n. with rcll being accorded a [J-gun salute whom hjlrt nm) and an escort of honor when hr ar- due lo some Inexplicable coinciJeiice fortress-like building to t li MAJ. liKS. HKNliV TF.IWK1.L JR. corps al Camp Campbell, Ky., ac- rivcd at Campbell Army Air base to take bis new command. The report stalcil he cair.e to Catnp Campbell from 2cl Artciy heaciqurirUTV Memphis. Tcnn., tn I assume liis new command. started down the road In Villa VIr- u.'iliappy bc.ichhead I correspondents. i I had gos'.c- only a shmt distance when the [ir.st shell landed near- by. It followed bv several others somewhat nearer. In the subsequent clirl-hHllnR derby I found Three days of Inac- tion hadn't even my footwork and timing. I made mine lirst downs In the next few minutes ihcn the whole Notre Damr backlield. Finally I arrived at tlie Villa iliir.Viiv. V.'rll. 'hal was a pretty hot reception, hut I'm glad it's ail over now." 1 also was think- ing a number o! r.tlirr things which News that the Germans had oo" cnpitd t'l grounds of the Pope's summer palace a.t CaMcl Gandolfo was regarded as another Instance of N'ari determination to resist to- the la.st at whatever cast in men or principles. The German communique de- clared (hat a sharp Allied attack azainst the German lines al Car. roceto lAprilia) had been beaten back. Tlie Allirrl communique said a Grrni.in .itUck nn the beach- bc.Mrn back Tester- day and the fart thai rvnly one attack was made Ibat in- '_ dlralcrl (he fcrrifir cffcft of Allirrt air alUrks on the pre- vtous day when fe-ur-fnpined Somrirrs uerp diurlcd from normal lont ranpe l.uccls to (ram up with medium and In pulirriilnjf tlie itathfrinir ranzrr divisions and nreckinf communications. Allied hextqiiar'ers AIRLINKR FOL'Xn IN MISSISSIPPI with prnppliiig hnoks loralcii an I glms American airliner in of walcr on llic bottom of the Mississippi river IS miles south and fichtrr-bombcrs of Memphis. Tcnn., where it crashed prcsuiuably carrying 21 passengers and a crew of.whined down directly overhead, three to their deaths. Tlie crew of the plane arc" shown nhovc. left In right are: Captain dumped tombs down and Francis. Co-Pilot .Majors and Miss Dovie Holybee, stewardess.' All three made their home "nwkEd off the win- in Fort Worth. (NKA Tj. Col. 1 announced would rau.-r any tirn-spapfr to liavc during the stiff fijrlllinr on Us word class mailtnc privllaces I fronts diiruic the past seven revoked if it pnutrd them. (days more than 3.000 crack Ger- I ro'.i'.dn't Ilr.d anvbody al home i man trnoiw had been taken where the publlr rclalions oilier anrt prisoner. Tills the Allied rorrrspnnrlmrs' rnMrlrrs should be, ibac ID mnre U.OQO. virtually Thru 1 heard initrs issuine Hirer I nr.e dtvi-imi. since the iina.Mon ot Mnrir-s the old quarters. 11 Italy ocean September. Thlji went down and fo'inrt some of V.c J decs no; Inc.'i.'de tlie heavy losses gain ll-.eif the enemy has suffered la killed "Why did von move down ar.rt wo'.mded. I asked, minis my typewriter on The ticrccr.c-w of the Ca.vl Ihe window sill. street fur-tins amid squalls, fl sleet, rain and f now case the rj ol "Stalingrad" to the little which building by building, bv house. Ls bcius cl'.cwcejfr blasted to pieces as the AmcT ir.ch their way forward aiu Germans just as stubborals] fend It ?.ith their blood.   

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